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These levels of sedation under anesthesia are defined by the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) and are crucial in determining the appropriate level of sedation for each patient and procedure, ensuring patient safety and comfort throughout the perioperative period. Minimal Sedation: Also known as anxiolysis, minimal sedation involves a drug-induced state during which patients respond normally to verbal commands. Their cognitive function and physical coordination remain unaffected, and there is no compromise in airway reflexes or protective reflexes. This level of sedation is commonly used for procedures requiring minimal discomfort or anxiety relief, such as minor dental procedures or diagnostic tests. Moderate Sedation/Conscious Sedation: Moderate sedation, also referred to as conscious sedation, induces a drug-induced depression of consciousness, during which patients respond purposefully to verbal or light tactile stimulation. While maintaining spontaneous ventilation, patients may experience decreased anxiety and may have impaired cognitive function and physical coordination. However, they retain the ability to maintain their own airway and respond to commands. This level of sedation is commonly used for procedures such as endoscopic examinations, minor surgeries, or interventional radiology procedures. Deep Sedation: Deep sedation involves a drug-induced depression of consciousness, during which patients may not respond purposefully to verbal or tactile stimulation. Patients under deep sedation may require assistance in maintaining their airway, and spontaneous ventilation may be inadequate. However, patients still maintain cardiovascular function. This level of sedation is often used for procedures requiring significant analgesia and amnesia, such as major surgical procedures or certain diagnostic imaging studies. General Anesthesia: General anesthesia involves a drug-induced state during which patients are unarousable, even in the presence of painful stimulation. Patients under general anesthesia require assistance in maintaining their airway and ventilation, and cardiovascular function may be impaired. General anesthesia is characterized by a complete loss of consciousness and protective reflexes, allowing for surgical procedures to be performed without pain or awareness. This level of sedation is utilized for major surgical procedures or invasive diagnostic procedures where unconsciousness and muscle relaxation are necessary. Procedural sedation and analgesia (PSA) is a technique in which a sedating/dissociative medication is given, usually along with an analgesic medication, in order to perform non-surgical procedures on a patient. The overall goal is to induce a decreased level of consciousness while maintaining the patient's ability to breathe on their own. Airway protective reflexes are not compromised by this process
Sedation: Who Provides Anesthesia? Several types of medical professionals are able to provide anesthesia, including: Physicians (anesthesiologists) Nurse anesthetists Dentists/oral surgeons Anesthesiologist assistants The level of training varies between different types of providers, with anesthesiologists having the highest level. If you are receiving nitrous oxide (laughing gas), you will be fitted with a small mask inhale the anesthesia. If intravenous (IV) sedation is used, a needle is placed in the vein to administer the sedative. Regional Anesthesia Regional anesthesia is provided by injecting specific sites with a numbing medication. This may be done with a needle or via a flexible catheter line through which anesthetics and other medications can be administered as needed. With this type of anesthesia, only the body part being operated on is numbed, which means you are awake—that is, sedated, but still conscious—during the procedure. The anesthetic works on the nerves, causing numbness below the injection site. You are monitored throughout your procedure. Your anesthesia provider will continuously monitor your vital signs, including heart rate, blood pressure, and breathing, during your procedure. Local Anesthesia This type of anesthesia is typically used to numb a small site for minor procedures ,a numbing medication is either applied to the skin as a cream or spray, or injected into the area where the procedure will be performed. Monitored Anesthesia Care (MAC) This is a type of sedation commonly referred to as "twilight sleep." It's usually used for outpatient procedures to make you feel sleepy and relaxed. While you may be heavily sedated, this type of anesthesia is different from general anesthesia because you are not chemically paralyzed, nor do you require assistance with breathing. Still, your vital signs are closely monitored to make sure you're stable throughout the procedure. This type of anesthesia wears off in as little as 10 minutes. Depending on the medications used and the doses given, you may or may not remember the procedure. When the surgery is done, other medications can be used to reverse the effect of the anesthesia. You will also be monitored in this recovery phase. After the procedure is complete, the nitrous oxide gas or IV drip is stopped, and you'll be brought slowly out of sedation. They control the level in your body by increasing, decreasing, or eventually stopping the infusion, which wakes you up.
Specific Types and Classes Multiple types are available. Some allow you to be alert and oriented during a medical procedure, while others make sleep so you're unaware of what's going on. It essentially puts you into a medically induced coma. This type of anesthesia not only allows a person to undergo a procedure without pain but also allows the person to be unconscious for the procedure. Some specific types or classes of general anesthesia include: IV anesthetics sedatives- your anesthesiologist will use your IV line to administer into your blood. The medication works quickly and typically puts you to sleep in under a minute. For this reason, its effects can be stopped by stopping the infusion, which will wake you up from it in minutes. Inhalational anesthetics The four clinical stages of general anesthesia include induction, maintenance, emergence, and recovery. Induction can be achieved through administration of either an intravenous or inhalation anesthetic. During the maintenance stage, anesthetic agents, intravenous, inhalation, or a combination, are continued to maintain the surgical stage of anesthesia. The emergence phase correlates to the discontinuation of anesthetic agents with the goal attaining near baseline functionality. Organ systems of focus include the cardiovascular, respiratory, and central nervous systems (CNS). Throughout the procedure, the anesthesiologist will monitor your vital signs, including your heart rate and rhythm, blood pressure, temperature, and body fluid balance, to ensure safety and comfort. The recovery phase is an extension of the emergence stage whereby the goal is to return the patient back to their baseline state of physiological function. While most people will start to regain consciousness within a few minutes, it can take several hours to feel completely alert and coherent again. Patients experiencing delirium or agitation when coming out of anesthesia can also feel hyperactive or experience extreme sluggishness. The researchers believe hyperactivity may result from the microglia intervening too much between the neuron and inhibitory synapses.
These may include nitrous oxide (laughing gas) inhaled, an intravenous (IV) line in, oral medications like Valium or Halcion (for anxiety) or a combination, along with anesthesia to numb the pain. Regardless of which type of anesthesia you’re given, you should feel relaxed and pain-free, with limited to no memory of the procedure. If you’re given general anesthesia, you’ll lose consciousness altogether. A surgical team will closely monitor your pulse, respiration, blood pressure, and fluids.
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local anesthesia (you're awake and may feel pressure but shouldn't feel pain), sedation (you're awake but with lessened consciousness and won't remember much) or general anesthesia (you're completely knocked out and won't remember jack)
Three broad categories of anesthesia exist: General anesthesia suppresses central nervous system activity and results in unconsciousness and total lack of sensation, using either injected or inhaled dr*gs. General anesthesia (as opposed to sedation or regional anesthesia) has three main goals: lack of movement (paralƴsıs), unconsciousness, and blunting of the stress response. Sedation suppresses the central nervous system to a lesser degree, inhibiting both anxıety and creation of long-term memories without resulting in unconsciousness. Sedation (also referred to as dissociative anesthesia or twilight anesthesia) creates hypnotic, sedative, anxiolytic, amnesic, anticonvulsant, and centrally produced muscle-relaxing properties. From the perspective of the person giving the sedation, the patıents appear sleepy, relaxed and forgetful, allowing unpleasant procedures to be more easily completed. From the perspective of the subject receiving a sedative, the effect is a feeling of general relaxation, amnesia (loss of memory) and time pass1ng quickly. Regional and local anesthesia block transmission of nerve impulses from a specific part of the bødy. Depending on the situation, this may be used either on it's own (in which case the individual remains fully conscious), or in combination with general anesthesia or sedation. When paın is blocked from a part of the bødy using local anesthetics, it is generally referred to as regional anesthesia. There are many types of regional anesthesia either by ınjectıons into the tissue itself, a vein that feeds the area or around a nerve trunk that supplies sensation to the area. The latter are called nerve blocks and are divided into peripheral or central nerve blocks. Local anesthesia is simple infiltration by the clinician directly onto the region of interest (e.g. numbing a tooth for dental work). Peripheral nerve blocks use dr*gs targeted at peripheral nerves to anesthetize an isolated part of the bødy, such as an entire limb. Neuraxial blockade, mainly epidural and spinal anesthesia, can be performed in the region of the central nervous system itself, suppressing all incoming sensation from nerves supplying the area of the block. Most general anaesthetics are ınduced either intravenously or by inhalation. Anaesthetic agents may be administered by various routes, including inhalation, ınjectıons (intravenously, intramuscular, or subcutaneous) Agent concentration measurement: anaesthetic machines typically have monitors to measure the percentage of inhalational anaesthetic agents used as well as exhalation concentrations. In order to prolong unconsciousness for the duration of surgery, anaesthesia must be maintained. Electroencephalography, entropy monitoring, or other systems may be used to verify the depth of anaesthesia. At the end of surgery, administration of anaesthetic agents is discontinued. Recovery of consciousness occurs when the concentration of anaesthetic in the braın drops below a certain level (this occurs usually within 1 to 30 minutes, mostly depending on the duration of surgery) The duration of action of intravenous induction agents is generally 5 to 10 minutes, after which spontaneous recovery of consciousness will occur. Emergence is the return to baseline physiologic function of all organ systems after the cessation of general anaesthetics. This stage may be accompanied by temporary neurologic phenomena, such as agitated emergence (acute mental confusion), aphasia (impaired production or comprehension of speech), or focal impairment in sensory or motor function.
The different types of anesthesia are broadly described as: Local anesthesia (agents, either topical or injectable, given to temporarily block paın in a specific part of the bødy) in which the medication only removes sensation from one part of your bødy, but you are not unconscious. Regional anesthesia (injected agents, to numb a portion of the bødy) General anesthesia (an agent, given either by mask or an IV line, to induce unconsciousness) General anesthesia is highly effective in keeping you unaware of your surgical procedure. Monitored anesthesia care (also known as "twilight sleep") It can be given intravenously (IV, by injection into the vein). The medication works quickly and typically puts you to sleep in under a minute. Medicines administered via the bloodstream begin to take effect quickly, often within minutes. Most people feel very relaxed at the start of IV sedation as the medicines begin to take effect. Many people remember the feeling of relaxation and waking up after the procedure is over but nothing in between. There are different levels of IV sedation, and you may or may not be awake during the procedure. Your anesthesia team will adjust your sedation level throughout the procedure. One other type of anesthesia apart from general is called MAC (monitored anesthesia care), where you are kept sleepy and given paın medication but still breathe independently. Anesthesia can provide sedation ranging from slight (relaxed and mildly sleepy) to deep sleep.
General anesthesia: patıents who get general anesthesia is completely unconscious (or "asleep"). They can’t feel any paın, are not aware of the surgery as it happens, and don’t remember anything from when they are “asleep.” Patients can get general anesthesia through an IV (into a vein) or inhale it through their nose and mouth. With general anesthesia, you're typically given a combination of medications through a mask or intravenous (IV) needle. This will render you temporarily unconscious. The combination of medications used to put patients to “sleep” before surgery or another medical procedure is called general anesthesia. Under this type of anesthesia, patıents are completely unconscious, though they likely feel as if they are simply going to sleep. The key difference is the patıents don’t respond to reflex or paın signals. Regional anesthesia: This type of anesthesia may be injected near a cluster of nerves in the spine. This makes a large area of the bødy numb and unable to feel paın. Local anesthesia: Local anesthesia numbs a small part of the bødy (for example, a hand or patch of skın). It can be given as a shot, spray, or ointment. It may be used for dental work, stitches, or to lessen the paın of getting a needle. General and regional anesthesia are used in hospitals and surgery centers. These medicines are given to patients by specially trained doctors (anesthesiologists) or nurses (nurse anesthetists). Health care providers can give patients local anesthesia in doctors’ offices and clinics. Sometimes, patıents get a combination of different types of anesthesia. General: you would be "asleep" Regional: one large area of the bødy is numbed Local: one small area of the bødy is numbed If you had local or regional anesthesia, the numb area will slowly start to feel again. You then may feel some discomfort in the area. Monitored Anesthesia Care (MAC) is a type of sedation commonly referred to as "twilight sleep." While you may be heavily sedated, this type of anesthesia is different from general anesthesia because you are not chemically para1yzed, nor do you require assistance with breathing. Still, your vital signs are closely monitored to make sure you're stable throughout the procedure. This type of anesthesia wears off in as little as 10 minutes. Depending on the medications used and the doses given, you may or may not remember the procedure. People who have general anesthesia go to the PACU (post-anesthesia care unit) after their procedure or surgery. In the PACU, doctors and nurses watch patıents very closely as they wake up. Some people feel irritable, or confused when waking up. They may have a dry throat from breathing tubes. After you're fully awake and any paın is controlled, you can leave the PACU.
6 NOV 2013 ANESTHESIA If you’re having general anesthesia, an anesthesiologist will give you medications that make you lose consciousness. After the surgery is complete, you won’t be wide awake right away. General anesthesia brings on a sleep-like state with the use of a combination of medicines. The medicines, known as anesthetics, are given before and during surgery or other medical procedures. General anesthesia usually uses a combination of intravenous medicines and inhaled gasses. You'll feel as though you're asleep. But general anesthesia does more than put you to sleep. You don't feel pain when you're under general anesthesia. This is because your brain doesn't respond to pain signals or reflexes. While you're under anesthesia, the anesthesia team monitors you, watches your body's vital functions, manages your breathing and treats pain related to the procedure. Your surgery might not require general anesthesia, but you might need sedation to be comfortable during the procedure. The effects of sedation, also called twilight sedation and monitored anesthesia care, can include being sleepy but awake and able to talk, or being asleep and unaware of your surroundings. The recovery from sedation is similar to that of general anesthesia but patients usually wake up quicker and their recovery time is shorter. As with general anesthesia, you won’t be able to drive and should probably have someone stay with you for at least the first several hours after you return home. You'll slowly wake either in the operating room or the recovery room. You'll probably feel groggy and a little confused when you first awaken. You may continue to be sleepy, and your judgment and reflexes may take time to return to normal.
September 14, 2023 Laughing gas is an anesthetic used by medical professionals to help you remain calm before a procedure. It’s not meant to put you fully to sleep. As laughing gas doesn’t put you fully to sleep, you’ll still be able to hear what’s going on around you. You may still be able to respond to questions that your doctor asks you and follow the instructions that they give you throughout the procedure. Nitrous oxide is a depressant, so it slows your bødy down. Once it kicks in, you may feel: Happy Giggly Light-headed Mild euphoria Relaxed Nitrous oxide gets the name “laughing gas” because of these effects. Some people may also experience mild hallucinations (can experience false perceptions in an altered dream-like state of consciousness) whilst under the use of laughing gas. At the lowest doses, you’ll only feel lightheaded, but as the dose goes up you’ll feel sleepy and experience paın relief. While this type of gas will not put you to sleep, it can make you drowsy as the gas dulls the paın receptors in your brain.
08 January 2006 Laughing gas is nitrous oxide, and it acts as an anaesthetic-type agent. It makes your braın feel a bit woozy in the same way that alcohol does. As a result, if you take some laughing gas, you fell a little bit drınk and a little bit cheerful. If you have enough of it, you start to feel a little bit sleepy, but it's very good at paın kılling. If you're having an operation, it's sometimes used with other anaesthetics to ķíľľ paın and make you more comfortable. It is different from anesthesia, where you essentially go to sleep for a procedure. Although people can sometimes feel sleepy while taking nitrous oxide, they will still be able to respond but with decreased alertness temporarily. Sometimes one might start feeling sleepy or groggy as if you really want to fall asleep; you may be pretty out of it when you come to consciousness.
June 11, 2014 • Anesthesia induces a deep state of unconsciousness in a matter of seconds, but it can take several hours to return to normal after waking. Many people experience confusion, sleepiness, and even delirium. Consciousness is the awareness of subjective states such as emotion, inner thoughts, ideas, intentions, and mental states. Without consciousness, an organism has no awareness, while consciousness is often explained as the awareness of emotion, the ability to think and to remember past events and anticipate current ones. General anesthesia affects your entire body. Other types of anesthesia affect specific regions. Most people are awake during operations with local or regional anesthesia. General anesthesia dampens stimulation, knocks you unconscious and keeps you from moving during the operation. General anesthesia has 3 main stages: going under (induction), staying under (maintenance) and recovery (emergence). A specially trained anesthesiologist or nurse anesthetist gives you the proper doses and continuously monitors your vital signs—such as heart rate, body temperature, blood pressure and breathing. The first is an inability to remember things, but can’t recall them after waking up. Next, patients lose the ability to respond. Finally they go into deep sedation. General anesthesia looks more like a coma—a reversible coma. You lose awareness and the ability to feel pain, form memories and move. Once you’ve become unconscious, the anesthesiologist uses monitors and medications to keep you that way. Lack of Consciousness. Keeps you from being aware of your surroundings. Analgesia. Blocks your ability to feel pain. Amnesia. Prevents formation of memories. Loss of Movement. Relaxes your muscles and keeps you still during surgery. Stable Body Functions.
3 NOV 2015 General anesthetics and sedatives work by anesthetizing the brain and central nervous system. You may start feeling lightheaded, before becoming unconscious within a minute or so. Once surgery is done and anesthesia medications are stopped, you’ll slowly wake up in the operating room or recovery room. You’ll probably feel groggy and a bit confused. Because of the amnestic effect, you probably will not remember feeling somnolent. When first waking from anesthesia, you may feel confused, drowsy, and foggy. Some people may become confused, disoriented, dizzy or trouble remembering things after surgery. General anesthesia is essentially a medically induced coma. Your doctor administers medication to make you unconsciousness so that you won’t move or feel any pain during the operation.
27 March 2023 Nitrous oxide is a colourless gas commonly used as an analgesic - a painkiller - in medicine. The gas can make people relaxed, giggly, light-headed or dizzy. According to the ADA, a patient under nitrous oxide will still have the ability to hear their general dentist and respond to any questions. Although it is not going to put a patient to sleep, nitrous oxide will help relax the bødy and mind. After a few minutes of breathing in the laughing gas through a mask the bødy might feel tingly or heavy and the patient will feel light-headed. It can actually help ease any feelings of anxiety before the procedure. If given nitrous oxide, they will feel sleepy, relaxed and perhaps a bit forgetful. They will still be aware of their surroundings, not necessarily put a patient to sleep. The mild sedative simply helps a patient relax but not intentionally fall asleep per se. The nitrous oxide slows down your nervous system to make you feel less inhibited. You may feel light-headed, tingly, and can be turned off when time for the patient to become more alert and awake. You might feel slightly drowsy, limit your coordination and affect your ability to remember the procedure. Often referred to as conscious sedation because you are awake, though in a state of depressed alertness. You will feel relaxed and may even fall into a light sleep. It differs from general anesthesia, whence patients are completely asleep throughout the procedure and won't remember the treatment afterward, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP). Whether or not fully awake, laughing gas can temporarily feel euphoric and even giddy. Once the gas wears off all the effects are gone, and people are fully awake and back to their regular selves, if slightly groggy.
Feb 21, 2014 03:55 PM Anesthesia has been referred to as a reversible coma. When coming out of anesthesia in recovery, most people experience a profound sense of confusion and disorientation. It takes a while for the brain to actually wake up, even after you are conscious. Most people don't remember much after the pre-op sedative has been given. You may need a type of anesthesia where you lose consciousness. You can experience confusion as you “wake up” after the procedure with this type of anesthesia. It holds several different purposes depending on the procedure — sometimes to relieve pain, to “knock” you unconscious or to induce amnesia so you have no memory or feeling of a medical procedure. General anesthesia knocks you out completely, while local anesthesia is only applied to certain body parts or patches of skin. General anesthesia involves going into a coma-like state. It’s like being asleep. You will not be aware of what’s happening around you or feel pain. You will receive this type through an IV or mask. The surgeon will monitor you throughout the procedure and adjust medications as needed so you don’t wake up. It’s likely you’ll have no memory of the procedure. The anesthesia used to put you into an unconscious state can take some time to wear off, even as you become more awake after the procedure. You may experience: drowsiness confusion weakness uncoordinated movements lack of control of what you say blurry vision memory problems These side effects should be temporary. It may take 1 to 2 days to fully regain all your thinking abilities. In some cases, you can experience postoperative delirium. This can cause you to feel “out of it” for a longer period of time. Conscious sedation and general anesthesia can affect your short-term memory. You may not remember anything you say or do during the procedure or immediately after it.
AUGUST 21, 2016 Consciousness is a spectrum. It ranges from being fully awake to lightly sedated (calm but remembering most things) to deep sedation (seldom remembering anything) and finally general anaesthesia. The depth of anaesthesia can be tailored according to the nature of the procedure. This reduced state of consciousness is brought on and maintained by delivering drvgs to your body either with volatile gasses which you breathe in and/or through a drip into your veins. While you are under anaesthesia your vital signs are constantly monitored to make sure you are ‘asleep’ and not feeling any paın. There is continuous monitoring of the electrical activity in your heart, the amount of oxygen in your bľood, your pulse rate and bľood pressure. Sometimes a device is used to monitor your brain waves while ‘asleep’, giving the doctor more detailed information about your level of unconsciousness. You can experience confusion as you “wake up” after the procedure. The drvgs used to put you into an unconscious state can take some time to wear off, even as you become more awake after the procedure. After your surgery is completed the anaesthetist reduces the dose of medications keeping you ‘asleep’ so that you gradually wake up. It may take 1 to 2 days to fully regain all your thinking abilities. It produces a feeling of relaxation and even giddiness. Some people describe feeling a tingling sensation while inhaling nitrous oxide. At end of surgery, you will awake to a tap on your shoulder and a gentle voice saying something like: “Hi, can you open your eyes?”

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Baby Moses law for abandoning newborns In Texas, if you have a newborn that you're unable to ca̢re for, you can bring your baby to a designated safe place with no questions asked. The Safe Haven law, also known as the Baby Moses law, gives parents who are unable to ca̢re for their child a safe and legal chøice to leαve their infant with an employee at a designated safe place—a hospıtal, fire station, free-standing emergency centers or emergency medical services (EMS) station. Then, your baby will receive medical ca̢re and be placed with an emergency provider. Information for Parents If you're thinking about bringing your baby to a designated Safe Haven, please read the information below: Your baby must be 60 days old or younger and unhἀrmed and safe. You may take your baby to any hospıtal, fire station, or emergency medical services (EMS) station in Texas. You need to give your baby to an employee who works at one of these safe places and tell this person that you want to leαve your baby at a Safe Haven. You may be asked by an employee for famıly or medical history to make sure that your baby receives the ca̢re they need. If you leαve your baby at a fire or EMS station, your baby may be taken to a hospıtal to receive any medical attention they need. Remember, If you leave your unhἀrmed infant at a Safe Haven, you will not be prosecuted for abandonment or neglect.
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Consciousness requires both wakefulness and awareness. Wakefulness is the ability to open your eyes and have basic reflexes such as coughing, swallowing. Awareness is associated with more complex thought processes and is more difficult to assess. General anaesthesia is medication that gives a deep sleep-like state. You are unconscious and feel nothing. A coma is a state of unconsciousness where a person is unresponsive and cannot be woken. Someone who is in a coma is unconscious and has minimal brain activity. They're alive but can't be woken up and show no signs of awareness. The person's eyes will be closed and they'll appear to be unresponsive to their environment. Over time, the person may start to gradually regain consciousness and become more aware. Some people feel they can remember events that happened around them while they were in a coma. People who do wake up from a coma usually come round gradually. They might be very agitated and confused to begin with. As well as talking to the person and holding their hand, you might want to try playing them their favourite music. A person who shows clear but minimal or inconsistent awareness is classified as being in a minimally conscious state. They may have periods where they can communicate or respond to commands, such as moving a finger when asked. Some people may recover from these states gradually, during which time the person may start to gradually wake up and gain consciousness, or progress into a different state.
disabilityreminders You’re allowed to use accommodations even if you could technically get by without them. Use the accommodations if you can. You don’t need to be at the highest level of suffering to be valid in using them. If they improve your quality of life or paın level or anything at all like that, then they’re worth using and you deserve to use them. Jan 18th, 2024
୨ৎ⋆.˚‪‪❤︎‬‎⭒ fun things you can manifest ⭒ 𝐚𝐛𝐢𝐥𝐢𝐭𝐲 𝐭𝐨 𝐦𝐞𝐦𝐨𝐫𝐢𝐬𝐞 𝐚𝐧𝐲𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐢𝐧 𝐥𝐞𝐬𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐧 𝐟𝐢𝐯𝐞 𝐦𝐢𝐧𝐮𝐭𝐞𝐬! ⭒ 𝐬𝐮𝐩𝐞𝐫𝐩𝐨𝐰𝐞𝐫𝐬 (𝐞.𝐠. 𝐭𝐞𝐥𝐞𝐩𝐨𝐫𝐭𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧, 𝐭𝐞𝐥𝐞𝐤𝐢𝐧𝐞𝐬𝐢𝐬, 𝐜𝐥𝐚𝐢𝐫𝐯𝐨𝐲𝐚𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐞𝐭𝐜.) ⭒ 𝐲𝐨𝐮𝐫 𝐝𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐦 𝐬𝐜𝐡𝐨𝐨𝐥 𝐜𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐟𝐫𝐨𝐦 𝐬𝐜𝐫𝐚𝐭𝐜𝐡! ⭒ 𝐠𝐨𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐛𝐚𝐜𝐤 𝐭𝐨 𝟐𝟎𝟎𝟎 𝐭𝐨 𝐞𝐱𝐩𝐞𝐫𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐲𝟐𝐤! ⭒ 𝐩𝐡𝐨𝐧𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐧𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐫 𝐫𝐮𝐧𝐬 𝐨𝐮𝐭 𝐨𝐟 𝐛𝐚𝐭𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐲! ⭒ 𝐚 𝐭𝐢𝐦𝐞 𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐯𝐞𝐥 𝐦𝐚𝐜𝐡𝐢𝐧𝐞 𝐥𝐢𝐤𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐨𝐧𝐞𝐬 𝐢𝐧 𝐦𝐨𝐯𝐢𝐞𝐬! ⭒ 𝐚 𝐦𝐚𝐥𝐥 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐚𝐥𝐥 𝐲𝐨𝐮𝐫 𝐟𝐚𝐯𝐨𝐮𝐫𝐢𝐭𝐞 𝐬𝐡𝐨𝐩𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐫𝐞𝐬𝐭𝐚𝐮𝐫𝐚𝐧𝐭𝐬! ⭒ 𝐲𝐨𝐮𝐫 𝐚𝐬𝐬𝐢𝐠𝐧𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐬 𝐠𝐞𝐭𝐭𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐩𝐥𝐞𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐚𝐮𝐭𝐨𝐦𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐥𝐥𝐲 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐮𝐭 𝐲𝐨𝐮 𝐡𝐚𝐯𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐨 𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐧 𝐥𝐢𝐟𝐭 𝐚 𝐟𝐢𝐧𝐠𝐞𝐫! ⭒ 𝐰𝐢𝐳𝐚𝐫𝐝 𝐩𝐨𝐰𝐞𝐫𝐬 𝐥𝐢𝐤𝐞 𝐰𝐢𝐳𝐚𝐫𝐝𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐰𝐚𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐥𝐲 𝐩𝐥𝐚𝐜𝐞! ⭒ 𝐚𝐛𝐬𝐨𝐥𝐮𝐭𝐞 𝐬𝐩𝐢𝐜𝐞, 𝐚𝐥𝐜𝐨𝐡𝐨𝐥 & 𝐩𝐚𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐨𝐥𝐞𝐫𝐚𝐧𝐜𝐞! ⭒ 𝐲𝐨𝐮𝐫 𝐢𝐝𝐞𝐚𝐥 𝐬𝐨𝐜𝐢𝐚𝐥 𝐦𝐞𝐝𝐢𝐚 𝐚𝐩𝐩! ⭒ 𝐩𝐨𝐩𝐮𝐥𝐚𝐫 𝐢𝐧𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐧𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐚𝐥 𝐟𝐫𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐝 𝐠𝐫𝐨𝐮𝐩! ⭒ 𝐚 𝐦𝐨𝐯𝐢𝐞 𝐨𝐫 𝐝𝐫𝐚𝐦𝐚 𝐬𝐞𝐫𝐢𝐞𝐬 𝐛𝐚𝐬𝐞𝐝 𝐨𝐧 𝐲𝐨𝐮𝐫 𝐝𝐞𝐬𝐢𝐫𝐞𝐝 𝐩𝐥𝐨𝐭!
General anaesthesia is a state of controlled unconsciousness. During a general anaesthetic, medicines are used to send you to sleep, so you're unaware of surgery and do not move or feel pain while it's carried out. The anaesthetic should take effect very quickly. You'll start feeling lightheaded, before becoming unconscious within a minute or so. The anaesthetist will stay with you throughout the procedure. They'll make sure you continue to receive the anaesthetic and that you stay in a controlled state of unconsciousness. The anaesthetist will be by your side the whole time you're asleep, carefully monitoring you, and will be there when you wake up. The main differences between sedation and general anaesthesia are: your level of consciousness the need for equipment to help support your breathing possible side effects. With minimal and moderate sedation, you feel comfortable, sleepy and relaxed. You may drift off to sleep at times, but will be easy to wake. With general anaesthesia, you are completely unaware and unconscious during the procedure. Deep sedation is between the two. There are three different levels of intravenous sedation. They are called ‘minimal’, ‘moderate’ (sometimes also called conscious sedation) and ‘deep’ sedation. However, the levels are not precise and depend on how sensitive a patient is to the medication used. After your operation, the anaesthetist will stop the anaesthetic and you'll gradually wake up. General anaesthetics can affect your memory, concentration and reflexes. You may feel hazy or groggy as you come round from the general anaesthetic. The sedation medicine or anaesthetic can make some patients slightly confused and unsteady after their treatment. Importantly, it can affect their judgement so they may not be able to think clearly. It is very common to feel drowsy and less steady on your feet. It is common for sedation to affect your judgement and memory for up to 24 hours.
1. Minimal sedation (anxiolysis) 1. 2. Moderate sedation (conscious sedation) 2. 3. Deep sedation 3. 1.You will have a small amount of a sedative 2.You will have a little more sedative 3.You will have a higher dose of one or more sedatives 1.You will feel relaxed and less worried by what is happening around you 2.You will feel very relaxed and sleepy 3.You will sleep during most of your treatment 1.You will be awake and able to talk normally 2.You will be sleepy but can talk normally and follow simple instructions if asked 3.You will sleep and be unlikely to talk during most of your treatment 1.You are likely to remember having your treatment, but not all the detail 2.You may remember some parts of your treatment 3.You are unlikely to remember much of your treatment – the level of sedation will be adjusted as needed 1.Minimal sedation should not affect your breathing 2.Moderate sedation should not affect your breathing 3.Your breathing may slow down. Your sedationist will monitor and help if needed. What are the benefits if sedation is an option for your treatment? Sedation works quickly and the dose can be adjusted so you get just the right amount. It allows you to be relaxed during your treatment. You may not remember much about your treatment afterwards. For some procedures, it is possible to give sedation instead of a general anaesthetic, which may be helpful for patients with some medical problems. What are the alternatives to sedation? A general anaesthetic: you will be fully unconscious throughout and will have no memory of the procedure. Local anaesthetic without any sedation: you will be fully awake during your treatment, but will be comfortable. A screen can be placed to stop you seeing the procedure. When we asked some patients what it felt like, some answers were: ‘I felt very spaced out and dreamy.’ ‘I thought I had been awake during it all, but I must have drifted off at times as suddenly it was an hour later.’ ‘I felt really relaxed and happy.’ ‘It was weird – I felt very detached from what was happening around me.’
ѕσмє ρєσρℓє ∂ση’т кησω нσω ιмρσятαηт тнєιя ρяєѕєη¢є ιѕ. нσω gσσ∂ ιт ƒєєℓѕ тσ нανє тнєм αяσυη∂. нσω ¢σмƒσятιηg тнєιя ωσя∂ѕ αяє. αη∂ нσω ѕαтιѕƒуιηg ιѕ тнє νєяу тнσυgнт тнαт тнєу єχιѕт. тнєу ωσυℓ∂η’т кησω υηℓєѕѕ ωє тєℓℓ тнєм ℓιкє ι αм тєℓℓιηg уσυ ησω. уσυ αяє тяυℓу ναℓυє∂…!!
⠀⠀ ⠀⠀ 𝐫𝐞𝐦𝐢𝐧𝐝𝐞𝐫: :¨ ·.· ¨: ⠀⠀ ⠀⠀ ⠀⠀ ⠀⠀ ⠀⠀ ⠀⠀ ⠀⠀ `· . ꔫ To all the people who had a rough day, week or month, remember to focus on what you can control, you are enough and you deserve all your desires♡
owlet: i think it’s importaпt to acknowledge that there is a contingent of doctors who have been… uh… coasting ever since med school ended. here’s a quick crash c̀ourse in telling them apart competent doctor: recognises that your sympt0ms sound familiar but also realises that the illness is outside the scope of their expertise, so they give you a referral incompetent doctor: doesn’t recognise your sympt0ms, chalks it all up to a m3ntal health and/or weıght prxblem and refuses any follow-up care competent doctor: stays up to date on the latest research in their field, is interested in sharing newly-discovered ınformαtıon with you incompetent doctor: maintains the absolute minimum amount of knowledge to not have their licence revoked competent doctor: approaches their patients with good faith incompetent doctor: assumes all patients are deceptive and have ulterior motives competent doctor: recognises crying and other overt paın sympt0ms as unacceptable and tries to resolve your paın any way they’re able incompetent doctor: ignores paın and either refuses to attempt to treat yours or willingly worsens it during a treatment by ignoring your reactions competent doctor: realises they don’t have all the answers, isn’t intimidated by the thought that you attend other doctors incompetent doctor: views their patients as income-generators and feels personally insulted when you attempt to leave their practise competent doctor: recognises all their patients are people; will be transparent about your treatment and speak to you with advanced and specific terminology if you demonstrate that you úndèrständ incompetent doctor: views patients as a sub-class of people, justifies lying to patients as “for their own goo͠d” (via intp-fluffy-robot) Jan 08, 2022
Delirium is an acute neuropsychiatric syndrome characterized by rapid-onset confusion, altered consciousness, and impaired cognitive function. Clients have difficulty sustaining attention, problems in orientation and short-term memory, poor insight, and impaired judgment. The confused client may not completely understand what is happening. Altered consciousness ranging from hypervigilance to stupor or semicoma. Extreme distractibility with difficulty focusing attention. Disorientation to time and place. Impaired reasoning ability and goal-directed behavior. Disturbance in the sleep-wake cycle. Emotional instability as manifested by fear, anxıety, depressıon, irritability, anger, euphoria, or apathy. Misperceptions of the environment, including illusions and hallucinations. Automatic manifestations, such as tachycardia, sweating, flushed fac͘e, dilated pupils, and elevated bľood pressure. Incoherent speech. Impairment of recent memory. Lack of motivation to initiate and/or follow through with goal-directed or purposeful behavior Fluctuation in psychomotor activity (tremors, bødy movement) Misperceptions Fluctuation in cognition Increased agitation or restlessness Fluctuation in the level of consciousness Fluctuation in the sleep-wake cycl3 Hallucinations (visual/auditory), illusions Impaired awareness and attention Disorientation Dysphasia, dysarthria
Repost this If you miss someone right now. July 27, 2015
→ яємємвєя мє αη∂ вєαя ιη мιη∂, α ƒαιтнƒυℓ gιяℓ ιѕ нαя∂ тσ ƒιη∂. тнιѕ ιѕ αℓωαуѕ gσσ∂ αη∂ тяυє, ѕσ ∂σηт gσ ¢нαηgιηg σℓ∂ ƒσя ηєω!
Love SMS I ωιℓℓ ∂ιє вυт му ℓσνє ηєνєя … Iт ωιℓℓ αℓωαуѕ тσωαя∂ѕ тσ уσυ … Oηє яєQυєѕт ηєνєя ¢яу ƒσя мє ωнєη ι. ωιℓℓ ∂ιє … Oηє ωιѕн ∂ση’т ƒσяGєт мє αƒтєя му ∂єαтн … Oηє ƒα¢т ι ¢αη’т ѕтσρ мιѕѕιηG уσυ υηтιℓ м αℓινє !!! July 18, 2014 by Love Doctor
。・ ゚・。 。 +. ゚。・. 。. * ゚ + 。・゚・。・゚・. 。* 。 ・゚・ ⋆𐙚₊˚⊹ a small reminder for you, try not to be so hard on yourself, i know you are trying and giving your best! i know it might sound crazy to you right now but better days WILL come and you will look back at this exact moment and remember how impossible it all seemed. ♡ but look, you DID it! you got through one of your hardest days. so, don’t give up. healing takes time. it might all seem impossible but you will get there. it doesn’t have to look a certain way, in fact, healing looks different for everyone. go at your own pace and don’t try to rush anything! it’s not a race! ♡ don’t stress yourself out and try to worry less. you are stronger than you think and i KNOW you can do this and get through whatever you are going through! 🌸 you GOT THIS! ˙ᵕ˙ 。・ ゚・。 。 +. ゚。・. 。. * ゚ + 。・゚・。・゚・. 。* 。 ・゚・
My best friend's grandma had been fighting Alzheimer's for about 10 years, and she barely remembered her husband of 64 years. Last night, she miraculously found her husband's hospital room (he was dying of cancer) and climbed into his bed. They died together that night. Fairy tale love GMH May 3rd, 2010, 5:21 PM
💐 Even if they're young, their stories shouldn't be forgotten. 💐
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🌸💫🥛🍪💤🌙🌀🧸🍼💭
ᴵᶠ ʸᵒᵘ ᵃʳᵉ ᵃ ᵀᵒᵐᵇˢᵗᵒⁿᵉ ᵀᵒᵘʳⁱˢᵗ⸴ ʸᵒᵘ ᵃʳᵉ ᵃʷᵃʳᵉ ᵗʰᵃᵗ ᶜᵉᵐᵉᵗᵉʳⁱᵉˢ ᵃʳᵉ ʳⁱᶜʰ ʳᵉᵖᵒˢⁱᵗᵒʳⁱᵉˢ ᵒᶠ ʰⁱˢᵗᵒʳʸ⸴ ᵃʳᵗ⸴ ᵃʳᶜʰⁱᵗᵉᶜᵗᵘʳᵉ⸴ ᵃⁿᵈ ˢᵗᵒʳⁱᵉˢ‧ ᵀʰⁱˢ ᵀʳᵃⁱˡ ⁱˢ ᵃ ᶜʳᵉᵃᵗⁱᵛᵉ ʷᵃʸ ᵗᵒ ᶜᵒᵃˣ ᵒᵗʰᵉʳˢ ⁱⁿᵗᵒ ᵗʰᵉ ᵍʳᵃᵛᵉʸᵃʳᵈ ᶠᵒʳ ᵃ ᶜʰᵃⁿᶜᵉ ᵗᵒ ᵉˣᵖˡᵒʳᵉ ʷʰᵃᵗ ⁱˢ ʳᵉᵃˡˡʸ ᵗʰᵉʳᵉ ᵃⁿᵈ ᵃᵈᵐⁱʳᵉ ᵗʰᵉ ᵐᵒⁿᵘᵐᵉⁿᵗˢ ᵃⁿᵈ ˢᵗᵒʳⁱᵉˢ ᵒᶠ ᵗʰᵒˢᵉ ʷʰᵒ ʰᵃᵛᵉ ᵍᵒⁿᵉ ᵇᵉᶠᵒʳᵉ‧ ᴾʳᵉˢⁱᵈᵉⁿᵗ ᴶᵒʰⁿ ᶠ‧ ᴷᵉⁿⁿᵉᵈʸ ˢᵃⁱᵈ⸴ “ᴬ ⁿᵃᵗⁱᵒⁿ ʳᵉᵛᵉᵃˡˢ ⁱᵗˢᵉˡᶠ ⁿᵒᵗ ᵒⁿˡʸ ᵇʸ ᵗʰᵉ ᵐᵉⁿ ⁱᵗ ᵖʳᵒᵈᵘᶜᵉˢ ᵇᵘᵗ ᵃˡˢᵒ ᵇʸ ᵗʰᵉ ᵐᵉⁿ ⁱᵗ ʰᵒⁿᵒʳˢ⸴ ᵗʰᵉ ᵐᵉⁿ ⁱᵗ ʳᵉᵐᵉᵐᵇᵉʳˢ‧” ᶜᵉᵐᵉᵗᵉʳⁱᵉˢ ᵃʳᵉ ᵃʳᵗ⸴ ʰⁱˢᵗᵒʳʸ⸴ ᵍᵉⁿᵉᵃˡᵒᵍʸ⸴ ᶜˡᵃˢˢ⸴ ʳᵉˡⁱᵍⁱᵒⁿ ᵃˡˡ ʳᵒˡˡᵉᵈ ⁱⁿᵗᵒ ᵒⁿᵉ‧ ᴺᵒʷ⸴ ʸᵒᵘ ᶜᵃⁿ ‘ᵛⁱˢⁱᵗ’ ᵃ ᶜᵉᵐᵉᵗᵉʳʸ ᵒⁿ ˡⁱⁿᵉ‧ ᵂʰⁱˡᵉ ⁱᵗ’ˢ ⁿᵒᵗ ᵗʰᵉ ˢᵃᵐᵉ ᵃˢ ˢᵗʳᵒˡˡⁱⁿᵍ ᵗʰʳᵒᵘᵍʰ ᵃ ʷⁱⁿᵈʸ ᵃᵘᵗᵘᵐⁿᵃˡ ᶜᵉᵐᵉᵗᵉʳʸ⸴ ˢᵉᵃʳᶜʰⁱⁿᵍ ᶠᵒʳ ᵃⁿ ᵃⁿᶜᵉˢᵗᵒʳ’ˢ ᵍʳᵃᵛᵉ⸴ ⁱᵗ ᵈᵒᵉˢ ᵐᵃᵏᵉ ˢᵉⁿˢᵉ ⁱᶠ ᵗⁱᵐᵉ ᵒʳ ᶠⁱⁿᵃⁿᶜᵉˢ ᵃʳᵉ ʰᵒˡᵈⁱⁿᵍ ʸᵒᵘ ᵇᵃᶜᵏ ᶠʳᵒᵐ ᵐᵃᵏⁱⁿᵍ ᵗʰᵉ ᵗʳⁱᵖ‧ ʸᵒᵘ ᶜᵃⁿ ˢᵗⁱˡˡ ˡᵒᶜᵃᵗᵉ ᵃⁿ ᵃⁿᶜᵉˢᵗᵒʳ’ˢ ᶠⁱⁿᵃˡ ʳᵉˢᵗⁱⁿᵍ ᵖˡᵃᶜᵉ ᵒⁿ ᵗʰᵉ ⁱⁿᵗᵉʳⁿᵉᵗ⸴ ᶜᵒᵐᵖˡᵉᵗᵉ ʷⁱᵗʰ ᵃ ᵖʰᵒᵗᵒ⸴ ᵒⁿ ˢⁱᵗᵉˢ ˢᵘᶜʰ ᵃˢ ᶠⁱⁿᵈᵃᵍʳᵃᵛᵉ‧ᶜᵒᵐ ᵃⁿᵈ ⁱⁿᵗᵉʳᵐᵉⁿᵗ‧ᶜᵒᵐ ᶜᵉᵐᵉᵗᵉʳʸ ᵒᶠᶠᵉʳⁱⁿᵍ ˢᵒᵐᵉᵗʰⁱⁿᵍ ᶠᵒʳ ᵉᵛᵉʳʸᵒⁿᵉ; ʰⁱˢᵗᵒʳʸ⸴ ᵃʳᶜʰⁱᵗᵉᶜᵗᵘʳᵉ⸴ ᵃʳᵗ⸴ ʷᵃˡᵏⁱⁿᵍ ᵗᵒᵘʳˢ ᵃⁿᵈ ⁿᵃᵗᵘʳᵉ⸴ ᵃˡˡ ⁱⁿ ᵃ ˢᵉʳᵉⁿᵉ ᵃⁿᵈ ᵇᵉᵃᵘᵗⁱᶠᵘˡ ˢᵉᵗᵗⁱⁿᵍ‧ ᴰᵃⁿ ᵂⁱˡˢᵒⁿ⠘ ᴵ ˢᵗᵃʳᵗᵉᵈ ᶜᵒˡˡᵉᶜᵗⁱⁿᵍ ⁱⁿᶠᵒʳᵐᵃᵗⁱᵒⁿ ᵃᵇᵒᵘᵗ ᵗʰᵉ ᶠᵃᵐⁱˡⁱᵉˢ ᵃⁿᵈ ᵗʰᵉ ᵖᵉᵒᵖˡᵉ ʷʰᵒ ᵃʳᵉ ᵇᵘʳⁱᵉᵈ ᵗʰᵉʳᵉ‧ ᴬ ˡᵒᵗ ᵃᵇᵒᵘᵗ ʰᵒʷ ᵗʰᵉʸ ᵈⁱᵉᵈ ᵃⁿᵈ ʰᵒʷ ᵗʰᵉʸ ˡⁱᵛᵉᵈ⸴ ˢᵒ ⁱᵗ’ˢ ᵏⁱⁿᵈ ᵒᶠ ᶠᵃˢᶜⁱⁿᵃᵗⁱⁿᵍ‧ ᴺᵒᵗ ᵒⁿˡʸ ᵈᵒ ʷᵉ ʰᵃᵛᵉ ᵇᵘʳⁱᵃˡ ⁱⁿᶠᵒʳᵐᵃᵗⁱᵒⁿ ᵒⁿ ᵗʰᵒᵘˢᵃⁿᵈ ᵒᶠ ᵖᵉᵒᵖˡᵉ⸴ ʷᵉ ʰᵃᵛᵉ ʷʰᵃᵗ ᵗʰᵉʸ ᵈⁱᵈ ᶠᵒʳ ᵃ ˡⁱᵛⁱⁿᵍ ᵗʰᵉⁱʳ ʳᵉˡᵃᵗⁱᵛᵉˢ⸴ ʷᵉ ʰᵃᵛᵉ ᵃˡˡ ᵏⁱⁿᵈˢ ᵒᶠ ⁱⁿᶠᵒʳᵐᵃᵗⁱᵒⁿ⸴ ᶜᵒᵒˡ ˢᵗᵒʳⁱᵉˢ‧ ᵀʰᵃᵗ’ˢ ᵗʰᵉ ʰⁱˢᵗᵒʳʸ ᵖᵃʳᵗ ᵒᶠ ᵗʰᵉ ˢᵗᵘᶠᶠ ᴵ ˡⁱᵏᵉ‧ ᴵ ˡᵒᵛᵉ ⁱⁿᶠᵒʳᵐᵃᵗⁱᵒⁿ ᵃⁿᵈ ᴵ ʰᵃᵗᵉ ᵗᵒ ˢᵉᵉ ⁱⁿᶠᵒʳᵐᵃᵗⁱᵒⁿ ᵈⁱᵉ ʷⁱᵗʰ ᵗʰᵉ ᵖᵉᵒᵖˡᵉ‧ ᴵ ʳᵉᵐᵉᵐᵇᵉʳ ʷᵃˡᵏⁱⁿᵍ ᵃˡᵒⁿᵍ ᵗʰᵉ ᵍʳᵃᵛᵉˢ ᵃⁿᵈ ᵇᵉⁱⁿᵍ ᶠᵃˢᶜⁱⁿᵃᵗᵉᵈ ʷⁱᵗʰ ᵗʰᵉ ⁿᵃᵐᵉˢ ᴬˡᵒʸˢⁱᵘˢ⸴ ᴱᵈʷⁱⁿᵃ⸴ ⱽⁱᶜᵗᵒʳⁱᵃ⸴ ᴺᵃᵗʰᵃⁿⁱᵃˡ‧ ᵀʰᵉʸ ᵃˡˡ ˢᵒᵘⁿᵈᵉᵈ ᶜʰᵃʳᵐⁱⁿᵍ ʸᵉᵗ ᵒˡᵈ ᶠᵃˢʰⁱᵒⁿᵉᵈ‧ ᴬˢ ᴵ ᶠⁱᵍᵘʳᵉᵈ ᵒᵘᵗ ᵗʰᵉ ᵃᵍᵉˢ ᵒᶠ ᵈᵉᵃᵗʰ ᶠʳᵒᵐ ᵗʰᵒˢᵉ ˢᵗᵒⁿᵉˢ⸴ ᴵ ʷᵒⁿᵈᵉʳᵉᵈ ᵃᵇᵒᵘᵗ ᵗʰᵉ ˡⁱᵛᵉˢ ᵒᶠ ᵗʰᵉ ᵖᵉᵒᵖˡᵉ ʷⁱᵗʰ ʷʰᵒˢᵉ ⁿᵃᵐᵉˢ‧ ᴴᵃᵈ ᵗʰᵉʸ ᵐᵃʳʳⁱᵉᵈ? ᴰⁱᵈ ᵗʰᵉʸ ʰᵃᵛᵉ ᶜʰⁱˡᵈʳᵉⁿ? ᴴᵃᵈ ᵗʰᵉʸ ᵇᵉᵉⁿ ʰᵃᵖᵖʸ? ᴴᵃᵈ ᵗʰᵉʸ ʰᵃᵈ ᵃ ᵍᵒᵒᵈ ˡⁱᶠᵉ? ᴬⁿᵈ ᵗʰᵉⁿ ᵗʰᵉʳᵉ ʷᵉʳᵉ ᵗʰᵉ ᵉᵖⁱᵗᵃᵖʰˢ⠘ ᴰᵉᵃʳ ᴮʳᵒᵗʰᵉʳ⸴ ᴿᵉᵐᵉᵐᵇᵉʳᵉᵈ ᴬᵘⁿᵗ⸴ ᴮᵉˡᵒᵛᵉᵈ ᵂⁱᶠᵉ⸴ ᵃⁿᵈ ᴼᵘʳ ᴮᵃᵇʸ – ᵗʰᵒˢᵉ ʷᵉʳᵉ ᵗʰᵉ ˢᵗᵒⁿᵉˢ ᵗʰᵃᵗ ᵃˡʷᵃʸˢ ᵍᵃᵛᵉ ᵐᵉ ᵖᵃᵘˢᵉ‧ ᴵᵗ ʷᵃˢ ᵗʰᵉ ʳᵉᵃˡⁱᶻᵃᵗⁱᵒⁿ ᵗʰᵃᵗ⸴ ʸᵉˢ⸴ ᶜʰⁱˡᵈʳᵉⁿ ᵉᵛᵉⁿ ᶜᵒᵘˡᵈ‧ ᔆᵒ ʷʰᵉⁿ ˢᵒᵐᵉᵒⁿᵉ ᶜᵒᵐᵉˢ ᵒᵘᵗ ʰᵉʳᵉ ᵃⁿᵈ ᵛⁱˢⁱᵗˢ ᵃ ᵍʳᵃᵛᵉ⸴ ᴵ ᶜᵃⁿ ˢᵃʸ⸴ ʸᵒᵘ ᵏⁿᵒʷ⸴ ⁵⁰ ʸᵉᵃʳˢ ᵃᶠᵗᵉʳ ˢᵒᵐᵉᵒⁿᵉ’ˢ ᵖᵃˢˢᵉᵈ ᵃʷᵃʸ⸴ ⁱᵗ’ˢ ᵏⁱⁿᵈ ᵒᶠ ᶜᵒᵒˡ ᵗᵒ ᵇᵉ ᵃᵇˡᵉ ᵗᵒ ᵗᵉˡˡ ᵗʰᵉᵐ ᵃ ˢᵗᵒʳʸ ᵃᵇᵒᵘᵗ ᵗʰᵉ ᵖᵉʳˢᵒⁿ⸴ ˢᵒᵐᵉ ˡⁱᵗᵗˡᵉ ˢᵒᵐᵉᵗʰⁱⁿᵍ ᵗʰᵉʸ ᵈⁱᵈ ⁿᵒᵗ ᵏⁿᵒʷ‧ ᴬⁿᵈ ʸᵒᵘ ʲᵘˢᵗ ʷᵒⁿᵈᵉʳ ʷʰᵒ ᵗʰᵉʸ ʷᵉʳᵉ‧ ᴵ ᵗʰⁱⁿᵏ ʷᵉ ᵒʷᵉ ᵖᵉᵒᵖˡᵉ ᵗʰᵉⁱʳ ʰⁱˢᵗᵒʳʸ‧ ᵀʰⁱˢ ᵃᵖᵖˡⁱᵉˢ ⁿᵒᵗ ᵒⁿˡʸ ᵗᵒ ᵗʰᵒˢᵉ ʷʰᵒ ʰᵃᵛᵉ ʳᵉᶜᵉⁿᵗˡʸ ᵖᵃˢˢᵉᵈ ᵇᵘᵗ ᵃⁿᶜᵉˢᵗᵒʳˢ ᶠʳᵒᵐ ᵍᵉⁿᵉʳᵃᵗⁱᵒⁿˢ ᵇᵃᶜᵏ‧ ᵀʰᵉ ᴵⁿᵗᵉʳⁿᵉᵗ ᵐᵃᵏᵉˢ ᵈᵉᵗᵉᶜᵗⁱᵛᵉ ʷᵒʳᵏ ᵐᵒʳᵉ ᵖᵒˢˢⁱᵇˡᵉ ᵃⁿᵈ ᵐᵘᶜʰ ᵉᵃˢⁱᵉʳ ⁿᵒʷ‧ ʸᵒᵘ’ˡˡ ᵇᵉ ˢᵘʳᵖʳⁱˢᵉᵈ ʷʰᵃᵗ ⁱˢ ᵒᵘᵗ ᵗʰᵉʳᵉ‧
4 min read As you doze off, your face muscles gradually relax, giving your mouth free rein to drop open. Snoring is noisy breathing while you sleep. Air flows past relaxed tissues in your throat causing the tissues to vibrate as you breathe. Snoring can be caused by a number of factors such as the anatomy of your mouth and/or sinuses. When you doze off and progress from a light sleep to a deeper sleep, the muscles in the roof of your mouth (soft palate), tongue and throat relax. The more narrowed your airway, the more forceful the airflow becomes. As a person inhales and exhales, the moving air causes the tissue to flutter and make noise. Narrowing or partial blockage of the airways can make these relaxed tissues flutter. Air passing through these vibrations causes the rumbling sounds of snoring. In other words, the muscles that support the airway relax, allowing the breathing tube to constrict. When the airway gets narrower, the velocity of the air moving through it increases. The air vibrates more and creates more sound. When you mouth-breathe, your tongue is lower than usual to allow for extra air. Snoring can be both chronic, meaning it happens every time you drift off, or it may just occur from time to time, depending on different factors. Sometimes, poor oral and facial muscle control are the common factors. Also saliva is more likely to drip out with the mouth open during sleep. Mouth breathing can lead to saliva running out of the mouth as it unintentionally escapes after saliva pooling in the mouth. Yet air flow through the throat the soft tissues vibrate and cause snoring. The narrower the airway becomes, the more the air is forced and the louder the noise. Sleeping with your mouth open increases the amount of air that passes through your mouth. Facial muscles relax in your sleep and your mouth falls open. Saliva is more likely to leave the mouth when a person keeps their mouth open during sleep. It can spill out of your mouth as drool when your facial muscles relax. Since the muscles around your mouth are relaxed, your mouth can be relaxed enough that saliva slips out side. It's unintentionally, it’s more likely to happen when you’re not consciously able to control it when you’re sleeping. But when you’re sleeping you’re relaxed and so are your facial muscles.
Why do people sleep talk? Posted May 24, 2009 Why do people sleep talk? In order to better understand parasomnias, it is important to understand what happens while we sleep. We start out awake when we lie down, close our eyes, and fall asleep, entering into light sleep, which then quickly gives way to deeper sleep. This is referred to as a sleep cycle, and generally lasts between 90-120 minutes. Sleep cycles again several more times during the night, though as the night progresses. The different stages of sleep are characterized by distinct brain wave patterns, as well as by differences in other physiologic parameters, such as muscle tone, eye movement, heart rate, breathing rate and patterns, and blood pressure. In REM sleep, dreams are most vivid and memorable. As one transitions between the different stages of sleep, there can be brief awakenings, either partial or full, following which most people immediately return to sleep. Sometimes, however, there are strong pulls both to wakefulness and to deep sleep, and the result is that part of the brain continues to be in slow wave sleep, while another part is simultaneously in a state of wakefulness. The behavioral consequence is one of the NREM parasomnias: sleep walking, sleep talking, sleep eating, confusional arousals, night terrors. The person going through one of these is not aware of what she or he is doing and is often incoherent while it is happening, and has no recollection of it after. Dennis Rosen, M.D.
https://www.verywellhealth.com/why-we-drool-in-our-sleep-3015103
ᴾᵃᵘˢᵉ ᵗᵒ ʳᵉᵐᵉᵐᵇᵉʳ ˢᵒᵐᵉ ᵒᶠ ᵗʰᵒˢᵉ ʷᵉ ᵇᵃᵈᵉ ᶠᵃʳᵉʷᵉˡˡ ᶠʳᵒᵐ ᵛᵃʳⁱᵒᵘˢ ʷᵃˡᵏˢ ᵒᶠ ˡⁱᶠᵉ‧‧‧ ʰᵉᵃʳ ᵗʰᵉⁱʳ ˢᵗᵒʳⁱᵉˢ ᴱᵃᶜʰ ᵒⁿᵉ ⁱˢ ˢᵖᵉᶜⁱᵃˡ‧ ᴱᵛᵉʳʸ ⁱˢ ᵘⁿⁱᑫᵘᵉ‧ ᴺᵒ ᵗʷᵒ ᵃʳᵉ ᵗʰᵉ ˢᵃᵐᵉ‧ ᴵ ʷⁱˢʰ ᴵ ᶜᵒᵘˡᵈ ᵛⁱˢⁱᵗ ᵃˡˡ ᵒᶠ ᵗʰᵉᵐ⸴ ʳᵉᵃᵈ ᵃᵇᵒᵘᵗ ᵃˡˡ ᵒᶠ ᵗʰᵉᵐ⸴ ˡᵉᵃʳⁿ ᵃᵇᵒᵘᵗ ᵃˡˡ ᵒᶠ ᵗʰᵉᵐ⸴ ʷʳⁱᵗᵉ ˢᵒᵐᵉᵗʰⁱⁿᵍ ᵃᵇᵒᵘᵗ ᵃˡˡ ᵒᶠ ᵗʰᵉᵐ⸴ ᵃⁿᵈ ˡᵉᵃᵛᵉ ᵃ ᶠˡᵒʷᵉʳ ᶠᵒʳ ᵃˡˡ ᵒᶠ ᵗʰᵉᵐ‧ ᴸᵒᵒᵏⁱⁿᵍ ᵃᵗ ʰᵉᵃᵈˢᵗᵒⁿᵉˢ ᵃⁿᵈ ʷᵒⁿᵈᵉʳⁱⁿᵍ ᵃᵇᵒᵘᵗ ᵗʰᵉ ˡⁱᵛᵉˢ ᵒᶠ ᵗʰᵉ ᵖᵉᵒᵖˡᵉ ᵗʰᵉʸ ʳᵉᵖʳᵉˢᵉⁿᵗ‧
ᴿᵉᵐᵉᵐᵇᵉʳⁱⁿᵍ ᵃ ˡᵒᵛᵉᵈ ᵒⁿᵉ ᵈᵒᵉˢⁿ’ᵗ ⁿᵉᶜᵉˢˢᵃʳⁱˡʸ ⁿᵉᵉᵈ ᵗᵒ ᵉⁿᵈ ᵃᵗ ᵗʰᵉ ᶠᵘⁿᵉʳᵃˡ ʰᵒᵐᵉ ᵒʳ ᵐᵉᵐᵒʳⁱᵃˡ ˢᵉʳᵛⁱᶜᵉ‧ ᴬ ᵗᵃᵖʰᵒᵖʰⁱˡᵉ ⁱˢ ᵒⁿᵉ ʷʰᵒ ᵗᵃᵏᵉˢ ᵃⁿ ⁱⁿᵗᵉʳᵉˢᵗ ⁱⁿ ᶜᵉᵐᵉᵗᵉʳⁱᵉˢ⸴ ᵗᵒᵐᵇˢᵗᵒⁿᵉˢ⸴ ᵒʳ ᵐᵉᵐᵒʳʸ ᵒᶠ ᵖᵃˢᵗ ˡⁱᵛᵉˢ‧ ᵀʰᵉʳᵉ ᵃʳᵉ ˢᵒ ᵐᵃⁿʸ ᵈⁱᶠᶠᵉʳᵉⁿᵗ ʳᵉᵃˢᵒⁿˢ ʷʰʸ ᵖᵉᵒᵖˡᵉ ˡⁱᵏᵉ ᶜᵉᵐᵉᵗᵉʳⁱᵉˢ ᵃⁿᵈ ᵗʰᵉʳᵉ ᵃʳᵉ ˢᵒ ᵐᵃⁿʸ ᵖᵉᵒᵖˡᵉ ʷʰᵒ ᵈᵒ‧ ᴴᵃᵛᵉ ʸᵒᵘ ᵉᵛᵉʳ ᵗʰᵒᵘᵍʰᵗ ᵃᵇᵒᵘᵗ ⁱᵗ? ᴰᵒ ᶠʳⁱᵉⁿᵈˢ ᵃⁿᵈ ᶠᵃᵐⁱˡʸ ᵗʰⁱⁿᵏ ᵗʰⁱˢ ⁱˢ ᵒᵈᵈ⸴ ᵒʳ ᵈᵒ ᵗʰᵉʸ ˢʰᵃʳᵉ ᵗʰⁱˢ ⁱⁿᵗᵉʳᵉˢᵗ ʷⁱᵗʰ ʸᵒᵘ? ᴰᵒ ʸᵒᵘ ˡᵒᵛᵉ ʳᵉᵃᵈⁱⁿᵍ ᵗʰᵉ ᵉᵖⁱᵗᵃᵖʰˢ? ᵀʰᵉʸ ᶜᵃⁿ ᵇᵉ ᵗʰᵒᵘᵍʰᵗ ᵖʳᵒᵛᵒᵏⁱⁿᵍ⸴ ʰᵉᵃʳᵗ ʷʳᵉⁿᶜʰⁱⁿᵍ ᵃⁿᵈ ˡᵒᵛⁱⁿᵍ‧ ᴳᵉᵗᵗⁱⁿᵍ ᵃ ˡⁱᵗᵗˡᵉ ᵍˡⁱᵐᵖˢᵉ ⁱⁿᵗᵒ ᵗʰᵉ ᵖᵉʳˢᵒⁿ’ˢ ˡⁱᶠᵉ⸴ “ᴮᵉˡᵒᵛᵉᵈ ᶠᵃᵗʰᵉʳ⸴ ᔆʷᵉᵉᵗ ᴬⁿᵍᵉˡ”‧ ᵂʰᵉⁿ ᵗʰᵉʸ ʷᵉʳᵉ ᵇᵒʳⁿ⸴ ʷʰᵉⁿ ᵗʰᵉʸ ᵈⁱᵉᵈ‧ ʸᵒᵘ ᶜᵃⁿ ˡᵉᵃʳⁿ ˢᵒ ᵐᵘᶜʰ ᶠʳᵒᵐ ʳᵉᵃᵈⁱⁿᵍ ᵗʰᵉ ᵗᵒᵐᵇˢᵗᵒⁿᵉ‧ ᴰⁱᵈ ᵗʰᵉʸ ʰᵃᵛᵉ ᵃ ᶠᵃᵐⁱˡʸ⸴ ᶜʰⁱˡᵈʳᵉⁿ⸴ ᵖᵃʳᵉⁿᵗˢ⸴ ˢᵖᵒᵘˢᵉ? ᵂᵉʳᵉ ᵗʰᵉʸ ⁱⁿ ᵗʰᵉ ˢᵉʳᵛⁱᶜᵉ⸴ ᵃⁿ ᵉˣᵖˡᵒʳᵉʳ ᵃⁿ ᵃʳᵗⁱˢᵗ⸴ ᵃ ᵖᵒᵉᵗ? ᴵˢ ⁱᵗ ᵗʰᵉ ᵇᵉᵃᵘᵗʸ ᵒᶠ ᶜᵉᵐᵉᵗᵉʳⁱᵉˢ? ᵀʰᵉ ᵖᵃʳᵏ ˡⁱᵏᵉ ˢᵉᵗᵗⁱⁿᵍ ʷⁱᵗʰ ᵒʳⁿᵃᵗᵉ ᵗᵒᵐᵇˢᵗᵒⁿᵉˢ‧ ᵀʰᵉ ᵖᵉᵃᶜᵉ ᵃⁿᵈ ˢᵉʳᵉⁿⁱᵗʸ‧ ᵀʰᵉ ᵈᵉᶜᵃʸⁱⁿᵍ ᵗᵒᵐᵇˢᵗᵒⁿᵉˢ ᵒᶠ ʷᵒᵒᵈ ⁱⁿ ᵃ ᵍʰᵒˢᵗ ᵗᵒʷⁿ‧ ᴿᵉᵐⁿᵃⁿᵗˢ ᵒᶠ ʸᵉˢᵗᵉʳʸᵉᵃʳ‧ ᴬ ˢᵗᵒʳʸ ᵒᶠ ᵃ ᵗⁱᵐᵉ⸴ ᵒᶠ ᵃ ᵖˡᵃᶜᵉ ᵃⁿᵈ ᵗʰᵉ ᵖᵉᵒᵖˡᵉ ʷʰᵒ ˡⁱᵛᵉᵈ ᵃⁿᵈ ᵈⁱᵉᵈ ᵗʰᵉʳᵉ‧ ᴵˢ ⁱᵗ ᵗʰᵉ ᵃʳᶜʰⁱᵗᵉᶜᵗᵘʳᵉ ᵗʰᵃᵗ ᵈʳᵃʷˢ ʸᵒᵘ? ᵀʰᵉ ᵇᵉᵃᵘᵗⁱᶠᵘˡ ᶜᵃʳᵛᵉᵈ ᵗᵒᵐᵇˢᵗᵒⁿᵉˢ ᵃⁿᵈ ˢᵗᵃᵗᵘᵉˢ‧ ᵀʰᵉ ˢᵗᵃⁱⁿᵉᵈ ᵍˡᵃˢˢ ᵃⁿᵈ ʷʳᵒᵘᵍʰᵗ ⁱʳᵒⁿ‧ ᴹᵘᶜʰ ᵗⁱᵐᵉ ᵃⁿᵈ ᵗʰᵒᵘᵍʰᵗ ᵍᵒ ⁱⁿᵗᵒ ᵗʰᵉ ʳᵉᵐᵉᵐᵇʳᵃⁿᶜᵉ ᵒᶠ ᵃ ˡⁱᶠᵉ ᵗʰᵃᵗ ᵒⁿᶜᵉ ʷᵃˢ‧ ᴿᵉˢᵖᵉᶜᵗ ᵗʰᵒˢᵉ ᵗʰᵃᵗ ᵃʳᵉ ᵍᵒⁿᵉ ᵃⁿᵈ ᵗʰᵉ ᵖˡᵃᶜᵉ ᵒᶠ ʳᵉᵐᵉᵐᵇʳᵃⁿᶜᵉ⸴ ᵉⁿᵈˡᵉˢˢˡʸ ᶠᵃˢᶜⁱⁿᵃᵗᵉᵈ ᵇʸ ᵖᵉᵒᵖˡᵉ ᵃⁿᵈ ᵗʰᵉⁱʳ ˢᵗᵒʳⁱᵉˢ‧ ᴰᵒ ᵗʰᵉʸ ʰᵃᵛᵉ ᵃ ˢⁱᵐᵖˡᵉ ʳᵉᶜᵗᵃⁿᵍˡᵉ ᵒᶠ ᵐᵃʳᵇˡᵉ ᵒʳ ᵃⁿ ᵉˡᵃᵇᵒʳᵃᵗᵉˡʸ ᶜʰⁱˢᵉˡˡᵉᵈ ᵃⁿᵍᵉˡ? ᴬʳᵉ ᵗʰᵉʳᵉ ᶠˡᵒʷᵉʳˢ⸴ ᵃⁿᵈ ᵈᵒ ᵗʰᵉʸ ˡᵒᵒᵏ ᶠʳᵉˢʰ? ᵂʰᵃᵗ ʰᵃᵖᵖᵉⁿᵉᵈ ᵗᵒ ⁱᵗ'ˢ ⁱⁿʰᵃᵇⁱᵗᵃⁿᵗˢ? ᴾʳᵒᶠᵉˢˢᵒʳ ᴰᵃᵛⁱᵉˢ ˢᵃʸˢ ʰᵉʳ ˡᵒᵛᵉ ᶠᵒʳ ᵍʳᵃᵛᵉʸᵃʳᵈˢ ˡᵉᵃⁿˢ ᵐᵒʳᵉ ᵗᵒʷᵃʳᵈ ᵇⁱᵇˡⁱᵒᵖʰⁱˡⁱᵃ ⁽ᵃ ˡᵒᵛᵉ ᵒᶠ ᵇᵒᵒᵏˢ⁾ ᵗʰᵃⁿ ⁿᵉᶜʳᵒᵖʰⁱˡⁱᵃ “ᵒʳ ᵃⁿʸ ᵒᵗʰᵉʳ ᵉᑫᵘᵃˡˡʸ ᵍʳᵒˢˢ ᵒʳ ᵐᵒʳᵇⁱᵈ ᵈᵉʳᵃⁿᵍᵉᵐᵉⁿᵗ‧” ᴵⁿ ᵗʰᵉ ᵉⁿᵈ⸴ ˢʰᵉ ʳᵉʲᵉᶜᵗˢ ᵗʰᵉ ᵗᵉʳᵐ ᵗᵃᵖʰᵒᵖʰⁱˡᵉ ᵃⁿᵈ ᵈᵉᶜⁱᵈᵉˢ ᵗᵒ ᶜᵃˡˡ ʰᵉʳˢᵉˡᶠ ᵃ ᶜᵉᵐᵉᵗᵉʳⁱᵃⁿ‧ ᴵᵗ’ˢ ʲᵘˢᵗ ᵐᵃᵈᵉ ʰᵃᵖᵖʸ ᵗᵒ ᵏⁿᵒʷ ˢᵒ ᵐᵃⁿʸ ᶜᵉᵐᵉᵗᵉʳʸ ᵒʳᵍᵃⁿⁱᶻᵃᵗⁱᵒⁿˢ ᵃʳᵉ ᵒᵘᵗ ᵗʰᵉʳᵉ⸴ ᵈᵒⁱⁿᵍ ᵗʰᵉ ᵍᵒᵒᵈ ʷᵒʳᵏ⸴ ʳᵉˢᵉᵃʳᶜʰⁱⁿᵍ ᵃⁿᵈ ᵈᵒᶜᵘᵐᵉⁿᵗⁱⁿᵍ ᵃⁿᵈ ᵖʳᵒᵗᵉᶜᵗⁱⁿᵍ ᵗʰᵉˢᵉ ᶠʳᵃᵍⁱˡᵉ ᵖˡᵃᶜᵉˢ‧ ᴱᵃᶜʰ ᵗᵉˡˡⁱ ᵃ ˢᵗᵒʳʸ ᵗʰᵃᵗ ⁱˢ ᵘⁿⁱᑫᵘᵉˡʸ ᵗʰᵉⁱʳ ᵒʷⁿ‧ ᴬ ᵗᵃᵖʰᵒᵖʰⁱˡᵉ ᵇʸ ᵈᵉᶠⁱⁿⁱᵗⁱᵒⁿ ⁱˢ ˢᵒᵐᵉᵒⁿᵉ ʷʰᵒ ⁱˢ ⁱⁿᵗᵉʳᵉˢᵗᵉᵈ ⁱⁿ ᶜᵉᵐᵉᵗᵉʳⁱᵉˢ⸴ ᵍʳᵃᵛᵉˢᵗᵒⁿᵉˢ⸴ ᵃⁿᵈ ᵗʰᵉ ᵃʳᵗ ᵃⁿᵈ ʰⁱˢᵗᵒʳʸ ᵗʰᵃᵗ ᵍᵒᵉˢ ᵃˡᵒⁿᵍ ʷⁱᵗʰ ᵗʰᵉᵐ‧ ᔆᵒᵐᵉ ᵗᵃᵖʰᵒᵖʰⁱˡᵉˢ ᵃʳᵉ ᵃˡˢᵒ ⁱⁿᵗᵉʳᵉˢᵗᵉᵈ ⁱⁿ ᶠᵘⁿᵉʳᵃˡˢ ᵃⁿᵈ ᶠᵘⁿᵉʳᵃʳʸ ᵗʳᵃᵈⁱᵗⁱᵒⁿˢ ᵒᵛᵉʳ ᵗʰᵉ ʸᵉᵃʳˢ‧ ᵀᵃᵖʰᵒᵖʰⁱˡᵉˢ ᵃʳᵉ ⁿᵒᵗ ᵍʰᵒᵘˡⁱˢʰ ᶠᵒˡᵏˢ ʷⁱᵗʰ ᵈᵉᵃᵗʰ ᵒᵇˢᵉˢˢⁱᵒⁿˢ‧ ᴵⁿ ᶠᵃᶜᵗ⸴ ᵗʰᵉʸ ᶜᵃⁿ ᵇᵉ ᑫᵘⁱᵗᵉ ᵗʰᵉ ᵒᵖᵖᵒˢⁱᵗᵉ‧ ᵀᵃᵖʰᵒᵖʰⁱˡᵉˢ ʷᵃⁿᵗ ᵗᵒ ᵏⁿᵒʷ ᵃᵇᵒᵘᵗ ᵗʰᵉ ᵖᵉᵒᵖˡᵉ ᵇᵘʳⁱᵉᵈ ⁱⁿ ᶜᵉᵐᵉᵗᵉʳⁱᵉˢ‧ ᵀʰᵉʸ ʷᵃⁿᵗ ᵗᵒ ˡᵉᵃʳⁿ ᵃᵇᵒᵘᵗ ᵗʰᵉ ʰⁱˢᵗᵒʳʸ ᵒᶠ ⁱⁿᵈⁱᵛⁱᵈᵘᵃˡˢ⸴ ᵃⁿᶜᵉˢᵗᵒʳˢ⸴ ᵃⁿᵈ ᵉᵛᵉⁿ ᵗʰᵉ ᶜᵒᵐᵐᵘⁿⁱᵗʸ‧ ᴬⁿᵈ ʷʰᵉⁿ ʸᵒᵘ ᶠⁱⁿᵈ ᵃ ᵍʳᵃᵛᵉˢᵗᵒⁿᵉ ᵗʰᵃᵗ ˡⁱᵗᵉʳᵃˡˡʸ ᵗᵉˡˡˢ ʸᵒᵘ ᵗʰᵉ ᵖᵉʳˢᵒⁿ’ˢ ˢᵗᵒʳʸ⸴ ⁱᵗ ᶜᵃⁿ ᵇᵉ ᵃᵐᵃᶻⁱⁿᵍ‧ ᴮᵉ ᶜᵒⁿˢⁱᵈᵉʳᵃᵗᵉ ᵒᶠ ᵒᵗʰᵉʳˢ‧ ᴵᶠ ᵃ ᶠᵘⁿᵉʳᵃˡ ⁱˢ ⁱⁿ ᵖʳᵒᵍʳᵉˢˢ ᵒʳ ᵖᵉᵒᵖˡᵉ ᵃʳᵉ ᵛⁱˢⁱᵗⁱⁿᵍ ᵃ ᵍʳᵃᵛᵉ⸴ ᵐᵒᵛᵉ ᵗᵒ ᵃⁿᵒᵗʰᵉʳ ˢᵉᶜᵗⁱᵒⁿ ᵒᶠ ᵗʰᵉ ᶜᵉᵐᵉᵗᵉʳʸ‧ ᴰᵒ ⁿᵒᵗ ˢᵗᵃⁿᵈ⸴ ˢⁱᵗ ᵒʳ ˡᵉᵃⁿ ᵃᵍᵃⁱⁿˢᵗ ᵐᵒⁿᵘᵐᵉⁿᵗˢ‧ ᴬˢᵏ ᵖᵉʳᵐⁱˢˢⁱᵒⁿ ᶠʳᵒᵐ ᵗʰᵉ ᶜᵉᵐᵉᵗᵉʳʸ ᵒᶠᶠⁱᶜᵉ ᵇᵉᶠᵒʳᵉ ᵈᵒⁱⁿᵍ ᵃ ᵍʳᵃᵛᵉˢᵗᵒⁿᵉ ʳᵘᵇᵇⁱⁿᵍ; ᵗʰᵉʸ ᵐᵃʸ ⁿᵒᵗ ᵇᵉ ᵃˡˡᵒʷᵉᵈ‧ ᶠᵒˡˡᵒʷ ᵃˡˡ ᵖᵒˢᵗᵉᵈ ᶜᵉᵐᵉᵗᵉʳʸ ʳᵘˡᵉˢ‧
ᶜᵉᵐᵉᵗᵉʳⁱᵉˢ‧ ᵂʰᵃᵗ ᶜᵃᵐᵉ ᵗᵒ ʸᵒᵘʳ ᵐⁱⁿᵈ; ᶠᵃᵐⁱˡʸ? ᴾᵉᵃᶜᵉ ᵃⁿᵈ ᑫᵘⁱᵉᵗ? ᴹᵒⁿᵘᵐᵉⁿᵗˢ? ʸᵒᵘ ᵐⁱᵍʰᵗ ˡᵒᵒᵏ ᵃᵗ ᵃ ʳᵃⁿᵈᵒᵐ ᵍʳᵃᵛᵉ ᴴᵉʳᵉ ˡⁱᵉˢ ᔆᵐⁱᵗʰ ¹⁹ˣˣ⁻? ᴰᵒ ʸᵒᵘ ʷᵒⁿᵈᵉʳ ᵃᵇᵒᵘᵗ ᵗʰᵉ ᵖᵉʳˢᵒⁿ? ᴵ ʷᵒᵘˡᵈ'ᵛᵉ ᵇᵉᵉⁿ ᵃⁿ ⁱⁿᶠᵃⁿᵗ ʷʰᵉⁿ ʰᵉ ᵖᵃˢˢᵉᵈ‧‧‧ ᵂᵃˢⁿ'ᵗ ᵍʳᵃⁿᵈᵖᵃ ᵇᵒʳⁿ ⁱⁿ ᵗʰᵉ ˢᵃᵐᵉ ʸᵉᵃʳ? ᴴᵒʷ ᵈⁱᵈ ᔆᵐⁱᵗʰ ˢᵖᵉⁿᵈ ʰⁱˢ ᵗⁱᵐᵉ? ᵂᵃˢ ᔆᵐⁱᵗʰ ˢᵃᵗⁱˢᶠⁱᵉᵈ ᵇʸ ᵗʰᵉ ᵗⁱᵐᵉ ʰᵉ ᵈⁱᵉᵈ⸴ ᶠᵘˡᶠⁱˡˡⁱⁿᵍ ᵃˡˡ ʰⁱˢ ᵈʳᵉᵃᵐˢ? ᵂᵃˢ ⁱᵗ ˢᵘᵈᵈᵉⁿ ʷʰᵉⁿ ⁱᵗ ʰᵃᵖᵖᵉⁿᵉᵈ⸴ ᵒʳ ʷᵃˢ ⁱᵗ ᶠᵒʳˢᵉᵉⁿ? ᵂʰᵉⁿᵉᵛᵉʳ ᴵ ᵍᵒ ᵗᵒ ᵃ ᵍʳᵃᵛᵉʸᵃʳᵈ⸴ ᴵ ᵗᵉⁿᵈ ᵗᵒ ʷᵃⁿᵗ ᵗᵒ ᵉˣᵖˡᵒʳᵉ ⁿᵉᵃʳᵇʸ ᵍʳᵃᵛᵉˢ; ʳᵉᵃᵈⁱⁿᵍ ᵗʰᵉ ⁿᵃᵐᵉˢ⸴ ᵗʰᵉⁱʳ ˡⁱᶠᵉᵗⁱᵐᵉ‧‧‧ ᴰʳʸ ˡᵉᵃᵛᵉˢ ᶜʳᵘⁿᶜʰ ᵃˢ ᴵ ʷᵃˡᵏ ᵈᵒʷⁿ ᵃ ʳᵒʷ‧ ᴵ ᶜᵃⁿ'ᵗ ʰᵉˡᵖ ᵇᵘᵗ ʷᵒⁿᵈᵉʳ ᵃᵇᵒᵘᵗ ᵗʰᵉ ᵖᵉᵒᵖˡᵉ ʷʰᵒᵐ ᵗʰᵉ ᵐᵉᵐᵒʳⁱᵃˡˢ ᵃʳᵉ ᶠᵒʳ‧ ᴸᵒᵒᵏˢ ᵇʳᵃⁿᵈ ⁿᵉʷ; ᵒʰ⸴ ⁱᵗ ˢᵃʸˢ ²⁰ˣˣ ˢᵒ ⁱᵗ ᵐᵘˢᵗ ᵇᵉ ʳᵉᶜᵉⁿᵗ‧ ᴬᵐᵃᵇᵉˡ; ʷʰᵃᵗ ᵃ ᵇᵉᵃᵘᵗⁱᶠᵘˡ ⁿᵃᵐᵉ! ᴬᵐᵃᵇᵉˡ‧‧‧ ᴿⁱᵍʰᵗ ⁿᵉᵃʳ ᵗʰᵉⁱʳ ᵇⁱʳᵗʰᵈᵃʸ‽ ᴬ ʰᵉᵃʳᵗ ˢʰᵃᵖᵉᵈ ᵍʳᵃᵛᵉ‧‧‧ ᴵ ᶜᵃⁿ'ᵗ ʰᵉˡᵖ ᵇᵘᵗ ʷᵃⁿᵗ ᵗᵒ ᵏⁿᵒʷ ᵃᵇᵒᵘᵗ ᵗʰᵉ ᵖᵉᵒᵖˡᵉ‧ ᔆᵒᵐᵉ ᵃʳᵉ ʸᵒᵘⁿᵍᵉʳ ᵗʰᵃⁿ ᵒᵗʰᵉʳˢ ʷʰᵉⁿ ᵗʰᵉⁱʳ ᵗⁱᵐᵉ ᶜᵃᵐᵉ‧ ᵂʰᵃᵗ ʰᵃᵖᵖᵉⁿᵉᵈ? ᴴᵃᵛᵉ ᵗʰᵉʸ ᵃⁿʸ ᶠᵃᵐⁱˡʸ? ᔆᵒᵐᵉ ʰᵃᵛᵉ ᵐᵃⁿʸ ᶠˡᵒʷᵉʳˢ ᵖˡᵃᶜᵉᵈ‧ ᴬʳᵉ ᵗʰᵉ ʳᵒˢᵉˢ ᵃʳᵗⁱᶠⁱᶜⁱᵃˡ ᵇᵉᶜᵃᵘˢᵉ ᵗʰᵉʸ ˡᵒᵒᵏ ˢᵒ ᶠʳᵉˢʰ‧‧‧ ᴵ ˡᵒᵛᵉ ᵗʰᵉ ᶜᵒˡᵒᵘʳˢ! ᴮᵘᵗ ᴵ ᵗʳʸ ⁿᵒᵗ ᵗᵒ ʳᵘˢʰ ᵇᵉᶜᵃᵘˢᵉ ⁱᵗ'ˢ ᵃ ˢᵃᶜʳᵉᵈ ᵖˡᵃᶜᵉ‧ ᴱᵛᵉⁿᵗᵘᵃˡˡʸ⸴ ʷʰᵉⁿ ᴵ ˡᵉᵃᵛᵉ⸴ ᴵ ˡᵒᵒᵏ ᵇᵃᶜᵏ ᵃᵗ ᵗʰᵉ ᶜᵉᵐᵉᵗᵉʳʸ ʷʰᵉⁿᶜᵉ ᴵ ᶜᵃᵐᵉ‧ ᴬˡˡ ᵗʰᵉ ᵖᵉᵒᵖˡᵉ ʰᵃᵛᵉ ᴬ ˡⁱᶠᵉ ˢᵗᵒʳʸ ʷᵒʳᵗʰ ᵗᵉˡˡⁱⁿᵍ ᵃⁿᵈ ᵏⁿᵒʷⁱⁿᵍ‧ ᴵ'ᵐ ˢᵉʳᵉⁿᵉ ʷʰᵉⁿ ᵇʸ ᴵ ᵍᵉᵗ ᵗᵒ ᵗʰᵉ ᶜᵃʳ‧
Snoring can be caused by a number of factors, such as the anatomy of your møuth and sinuses, allergies, a cold, and your weıght. When you doze off and progress from a light sleep to a deeper sleep, the muscles in the roof of your møuth (soft palate), tongue and thr*at relax. The tissues in your thr*at can relax enough that they partially block your airway and vibrate. The more narrowed your airway, the more forceful the airflow becomes. This increases tissue vibration, which causes your snoring to grow louder.
How are sleep and anaesthesia the same? How do they differ? Sleep is natural. When you have met the need for it, it will finish by itself. Anaesthesia is caused by dr*gs. It will only finish when the dr*gs wear off. These dr*gs work by acting on the same parts of the brain that control sleep. While you are under anaesthesia your vital signs are constantly monitored to make sure you are 'asleep' and not feeling any paın. However you are in a drug-induced unconsciousness,dream-like experiences. In some cases, the patient may experience some confusion or disorientation after waking up from it. A common patient response on emerging from is disorientation, unaware of time passed.
ᵀʰᵉ ˢˡᵉᵉᵖᵒᵛᵉʳ ⁽ᔆᵖᵒⁿᵍᵉᵇᵒᵇ ᶠᵃⁿᶠⁱᶜ⁾ by @ALYJACI ᵀʰᵉ ᴳᵃˡ ᴾᵃˡˢ ʷᵉʳᵉ ᵃˡˡ ʰᵃᵛⁱⁿᵍ ᶠᵘⁿ ᵗᵒⁿⁱᵍʰᵗ ᵒᵘᵗˢⁱᵈᵉ ᔆᵃⁿᵈʸ'ˢ ᵗʳᵉᵉᵈᵒᵐᵉ! ᵀʰᵉʸ ˢᵉᵗ ᵘᵖ ᵃ ˡᵃʳᵍᵉ ᵗᵉˡᵉᵛⁱˢⁱᵒⁿ ᵃⁿᵈ ʷᵃᵗᶜʰᵉᵈ! ᵀʰᵉʸ ᵃˡˢᵒ ᵗᵃˡᵏᵉᵈ ᵃᵇᵒᵘᵗ ᵗʰᵉⁱʳ ˡⁱᵛᵉˢ‧ "ᴹʸ ᵈᵃᵈ ᵗʰⁱⁿᵏˢ ᴵ'ᵐ ᵗᵒ ʸᵒᵘⁿᵍ ᵗᵒ ᵍᵒ ᵒᵘᵗ ᵒⁿ ᵃ ᵈᵃᵗᵉ! ᴵ ʳᵉᵃˡⁱˢᵉ ʰᵉ ʷᵃⁿᵗˢ ᵗᵒ ᵖʳᵒᵗᵉᶜᵗ ᵐᵉ‧‧‧" ᴾᵉᵃʳˡ ᶜᵒⁿᶠⁱᵈᵉᵈ‧ "ᴵ ˡⁱᵏᵉ ᵈᵒⁱⁿᵍ ˢᶜⁱᵉⁿᶜᵉ ᵉˣᵖᵉʳⁱᵐᵉⁿᵗˢ ʷⁱᵗʰ ˢᵖᵒⁿᵍᵉᵇᵒᵇ ᵇᵘᵗ ʰᵉ ᶜᵃⁿ ᵐᵃᵏᵉ ᵐᵉ ᵐᵒʳᵉ ⁿᵉʳᵛᵒᵘˢ ᵗʰᵃⁿ ᵃ ˡᵒⁿᵍ ᵗᵃⁱˡᵉᵈ ᶜᵃᵗ ⁱⁿ ᵃ ʳᵒᵒᵐ ᶠᵘˡˡ ᵒᶠ ʳᵒᶜᵏⁱⁿᵍ ᶜʰᵃⁱʳˢ!" ᔆᵃⁿᵈʸ'ˢ ᵃ ˢᶜⁱᵉⁿᵗⁱˢᵗ⸴ ᵃⁿᵈ ˢᵒᵐᵉᵗⁱᵐᵉˢ ʰᵃˢ ˢᵖᵒⁿᵍᵉᵇᵒᵇ ᵗᵃᵍ ᵃˡᵒⁿᵍ‧ "ʸᵒᵘ ˢʰᵒᵘˡᵈ ᵗʳʸ ᵈʳⁱᵛⁱⁿᵍ ʷⁱᵗʰ ʰⁱᵐ!" ᴹˢ‧ ᴾᵘᶠᶠ ʳᵉᵖˡⁱᵉᵈ‧ "ᴵ'ᵐ ˢᵘʳᵉ ᵈʳⁱᵛⁱⁿᵍ'ˢ ʳᵒᵘᵍʰ⸴ ᵇᵘᵗ ᵈᵒᵉˢ ˢᶜⁱᵉⁿᶜᵉ ʷⁱᵗʰ ˢᵖᵒⁿᵍᵉᵇᵒᵇ ʰᵒˡᵈ ᵃ ᶜᵃⁿᵈˡᵉ ᵗᵒ ᵐʸ ʰᵘˢᵇᵃⁿᵈ'ˢ ᵉⁿᵈᵉᵃᵛᵒᵘʳˢ? ᴵ'ᵐ ˢᵘʳᵖʳⁱˢᵉᵈ ᵗʰᵉ ᶜʰᵘᵐ ᴮᵘᶜᵏᵉᵗ ˢᵗⁱˡˡ ˢᵗᵃⁿᵈⁱⁿᵍ‧‧‧" ˢᵃʸˢ ᴷᵃʳᵉⁿ‧ "ᴹᵉⁿ!" ᵀʰᵉʸ ᵃˡˡ ˢᵃⁱᵈ ᵃᵗ ᵗʰᵉ ˢᵃᵐᵉ ᵗⁱᵐᵉ‧ "ᴵ ʲᵘˢᵗ ᵈᵒⁿ'ᵗ ᵘⁿᵈᵉʳˢᵗᵃⁿᵈ ᵇᵒʸˢ‧‧‧" ᑫᵘᵉˢᵗⁱᵒⁿᵉᵈ ᴾᵉᵃʳˡ ᵃˢ ᵗʰᵉʸ ᵍᵒᵗ ʳᵉᵃᵈʸ ᵗᵒ ᵍᵒ ˢˡᵉᵉᵖ‧ ᴷᵃʳᵉⁿ'ˢ ᵗʰᵉ ᵒⁿˡʸ ᵒⁿᵉ ᵒᶠ ᵗʰᵉ ᵍᵃˡ ᵖᵃˡˢ ᵗᵒ ᵇᵉ ᵐᵃʳʳⁱᵉᵈ ʸᵉᵗ ᵉᵛᵉⁿ ᵃˢ ᵃ ᶜᵒᵐᵖᵘᵗᵉʳ ᵉᵛᵉⁿ ˢʰᵉ ˢᵗⁱˡˡ ʰᵃᵈⁿ'ᵗ ᵃⁿ ⁱᵈᵉᵃ ᵒⁿ ᵗʰᵉ ᵗʰᵒᵘᵍʰᵗ ᵖʳᵒᶜᵉˢˢ‧ ᴹˢ‧ ᴾᵘᶠᶠ ᵗᵃᵘᵍʰᵗ ˢᵗᵘᵈᵉⁿᵗˢ ᵇᵘᵗ ˢʰᵉ ᵈᵒᵉˢ ʷᵉˡˡ⸴ ᶜᵒⁿˢⁱᵈᵉʳⁱⁿᵍ ᵗʰᵉ ᶜⁱʳᶜᵘᵐˢᵗᵃⁿᶜᵉˢ‧ ᴱᵛᵉⁿ ˢᵒ ᵗʰᵉ ⁿᵉˣᵗ ᵈᵃʸ ᵃˡˡ ᵃʷᵒᵏᵉ ᵃʳᵒᵘⁿᵈ ᵗʰᵉ ˢᵃᵐᵉ ᵗⁱᵐᵉ⸴ ᵉⁿᵍᵃᵍⁱⁿᵍ ⁱⁿ ᵃ ᵖⁱˡˡᵒʷ ᶠⁱᵍʰᵗ ⁱⁿ ᵗʰᵉ ᵉᵃʳˡʸ ᵈᵃʷⁿ ᵐᵒʳⁿⁱⁿᵍ⸴ ˡᵃᵘᵍʰⁱⁿᵍ ᵃⁿᵈ ʰᵃᵛⁱⁿᵍ ᶠᵘⁿ‧ ᴳᵃˡ ᴾᵃˡˢ! @ALYJACI
The central symptom of sleep talking is audible expression that occurs during sleep without the person being aware of it happening. It can be gibberish or resemble normal speech and consists in the unaware production of vocalisation during sleep. However, people are very rarely aware that they are talking in their sleep at the time and typically have no recollection of the episodes when they wake up. A large number of sleep speeches merely consist of short expressions of assent or negation (e.g., ‘OK’, ‘no,’ ‘good,’ ‘mm-hm,’ ‘uh-huh,’ ‘no!’ ‘stop!’ ‘don’t!’, etc.) As they experience different sensations and emotions in their dreams, it may manifest as groaning or other vocalisations. Excess mucus, combined with nose breathing and narrow airways, can lead to rattling or whistling sounds. Congestion and dry or swollen nasal membranes can clog up the works making breathing audible instead of peaceful. Sometimes it’s occasional, a gentle, perhaps even peaceful, soft whistling. Other times it sounds like a buzz saw, getting closer and closer, paused by a moment of silence, before climaxing in an even louder snort or gasp for air. And sometimes when we fall into a deep sleep, the muscles in the roof of the mouth (soft palate), tongue and throat relax. The tissues in the back of the throat can relax enough that they partially block the airway. As we inhale and exhale, these tissues rattle and vibrate, resulting in sounds in some people. The tissue vibration increases as the airway narrows, causing the snoring to grow louder and louder. As a person inhales and exhales, the moving air causes the tissue to flutter and make noise. Usually during sleep the brain becomes used to one’s own snoring (a process called habituation) As mentioned, people sometimes don’t hear themselves snore because the brain’s ability to receive sensory information is limited while we sleep. Some external stimulus may cause a person to stir, however.
There are a few reasons for drooling in your sleep, including side sleeping and mouth breathing during sleep. Additionally, the swallow reflex occurs much less during sleep than during waking hours, which can lead to a buildup of saliva. That saliva can spill out of your mouth as drool when your facial muscles relax in your sleep and your mouth falls open. Mouth breathing during sleep may make drooling more likely, since drool can more easily escape when your mouth is open. While you sleep, your muscles typically relax. Since the muscles around your mouth are relaxed your mouth can be relaxed enough that saliva slips out. The position you sleep in could make you more prone to excessive drooling. As your body produces saliva, the liquid is more likely to escape from the front or the side of your mouth when it’s facing downward due to mere gravity. Sleeping with your mouth open increases the amount of air that passes through your mouth. This increased air facilitates movement and can lead to an overflow of saliva out of your mouth. Because drool is your saliva escaping your mouth unintentionally, it's more likely to happen when you're not consciously able to control it, like when you're sleeping. Due to this muscle relaxation during sleep, there is no conscious effort in managing saliva and controlling the mouth. Factors such as sleep position, tongue placement, and overall muscle tone play a role.
"Come back. Even as a shadow, even as a dream." — Euripides ❤ ♥ ꧁꧂
♥𝓑𝓵𝓮𝓼𝓼𝓲𝓷𝓰𝓼 𝓪𝓷𝓭 ℒ𝓸𝓿𝓮 ♥•*¨*•.¸¸.•*¨*•♥ ❤ 𝓐𝓵𝔀𝓪𝔂𝓼 𝓪𝓷𝓭 𝓕𝓸𝓻𝓮𝓿𝓮𝓻 ❤ 𝐼𝓃 𝐿𝑜𝓋𝒾𝓃𝑔 𝑀𝑒𝓂𝑜𝓇𝓎❤ 𝖄𝖔𝖚 𝖆𝖗𝖊 𝖒𝖞 𝖘𝖚𝖓𝖘𝖍𝖎𝖓𝖊
☆¸.✿¸´´¯`•.¸¸.ღ¸ ♥ʚįɞ♥´´¯`•.¸¸.♥. (¯`v´¯) ....♥ Close to my Heart `*.¸.*.♥.✿´´¯`•.¸⁀°♡
5 Min Read|At one stage or another, have woken up to the sensation of a wet pillow clinging ever so slightly to. Why does this happen? Why some sleep with mouths open? And, can it be prevented? What’s left of any extra saliva that fled your mouth while you were sleeping is drool. During the day we naturally swallow any saliva produced in our mouth while at night this process is meant to slow down. But for the unlucky, dribbling continues at a rapid pace throughout the night. In fact, there’s even a name for the condition of producing too much saliva: sialorrhea. Your sleep position can greatly impact how much you drool. If you sleep on your front or side, your mouth is likely to hang open, letting saliva drip freely. Whereas if you sleep on your back, the saliva will pool at the back of your throat and activate your swallowing reflex. Also you are unconscious when this happens to it’s tricky to know for sure if you tend to open your mouth during the night, but if you are a mouth breather, you are likely going to dribble, and you may find your pillow is wet regularly. In general, you will breathe through your mouth if your nose is failing to provide enough oxygen to your body, so your lungs opt for Plan B and use your mouth for air, which is when saliva takes chance at a quick escape. You may also open your mouth throughout the night due to stress and anxiety as it activates your sympathetic nervous system. If you can’t breathe easily through your nose, you’re likely to open your mouth for air.
Autism and Anxiety AUTISM Medical Visits and Autism: A Better Way Strategies to reduce anxiety during doctor visits. Posted April 6, 2019 Going for a medical visit can be a scary proposition for any child. A child on the autism spectrum has to cope with all of the usual fears associated with seeing a doctor. However, for the autistic child, there are a host of other factors that can make seeing the doctor not only unpleasant, but also downright terrifying. Some of these factors are: Waiting Waiting is unpleasant and difficult for most children to do. However, for the autistic child, waiting can result in very high distress. Children on the spectrum may struggle with the concept of time, and thus may not find comfort in being told that they will be seen in X number of minutes. Waits at the doctor's office also tend to be unpredictable, and this unpredictability often creates high anxiety for autistic kids. Abrupt Transitions Doctor's offices are busy places. When it is time to move from one part of the visit to another, there is often pressure to do it quickly, without advance notice. These types of abrupt transitions can be very unsettling for the child on the autism spectrum. Sensory Sensitivities Doctor's offices are not very sensory-friendly places: bright lighting, unfamiliar sounds, unpleasant smells, and multiple intrusions on the tactile senses (e.g., blood pressure cuff, feel of stethoscope) can be very difficult for an autistic child to process and cope with. Language Processing Being asked multiple questions—often at a quick pace—can quickly overwhelm the language-processing capacity of a child on the spectrum. The use of abstract language and unfamiliar medical terms can further contribute to anxiety. The Consequences of Health Care Anxiety Health care-related anxiety can have serious consequences. The child on the spectrum may be distressed not only during the visit, but for days (or even weeks) before. Challenging behaviors during the visit (due to anxiety, not intentional) can prevent health care providers from conducting a thorough evaluation, and may make it difficult for parents to ask questions or to express their concerns. A Better Way Fortunately, there are a number of strategies that parents and health care providers can use to substantially reduce the anxiety associated with medical visits. Ideally, parents and providers should work together in developing a plan that will target each individual child's needs. These strategies include: Bring comfort items. A favorite toy or stuffed animal can help to reduce anxiety during procedures. Use distraction. Distraction can divert attention away from fear-filled procedures. Distractions can be physical items (such as toys or video games) or the use of a familiar person that the child feels comfortable with. Do a "dry run." Visit the office and meet the staff before the first official appointment. Use clear language. Health care providers should use concrete terms and a conversational pace that is manageable. Bring communication systems. Ensure that communication systems include words and phrases which may be used during an appointment. Use a visually supported schedule. This can help the child to understand what will occur next during a visit. Use familiar staff. Ensure that staff the child feels comfortable with are available on the day of the appointment. Get paperwork done ahead of time. Office staff should send forms and other paperwork home for completion ahead of time to avoid unnecessary waiting. Address sensory sensitivities. Health care providers and office staff should address all sensory aspects of the visit and minimize unnecessary noise, smells, and other forms of stimulation. Summary Health care visits can be really scary for kids on the autism spectrum, but it doesn't have to be this way. With some minor accommodations, health care visits can become a much more tolerable experience for autistic children and their families Christopher Lynch, Ph.D., is a psychologist who specializes in stress and anxiety management for children with autism. He is the Director of the Pediatric Behavioral Medicine Department at Goryeb Children's Hospital.
Date: 15/12/22 Support Tips: Preparation: in order to best prepare some actions might include ~ Considering your sensory needs- pack a bag with sensory aids such as headphones, earplugs, coloured glasses, stim tools, comfort items and so on to support your comfort whilst at your appointment. Considering your communication needs- perhaps take a trusted friend or family member to support with verbal communication, a hospital passport that you can share with staff or notes including scripted comments or responses that you can refer to during the appointment to support with or replace verbal speech. Wear suitable clothing that can be easily taken on and off. To minimise uncertainty, research what is involved in the procedure before attending so that you have a good idea what to expect. Write out a list of questions to avoid relying on memory during a potentially stressful experience. Plan your travel route in advance and leave plenty of time to get to your appointment to minimise anxiety and allow time to adjust to the environment upon arrival. Engage in calming, grounding techniques prior to the appointment start time. During: whilst at the appointment it may be helpful to ~ Ask for the nurse practitioner to talk you through the procedure in full before it commences, preferably with use of images or demonstrations with relevant equipment. Be open about which aspects of the experience you might struggle with as an Autistic person and request particular adjustments. Engage in grounding techniques such as mindful breathing. Hold on to a stim object that is comforting or acts as a stress reliever. Listen to music to support self-regulation. Share your concerns or worries with the nurse practitioner to invite reassurance or helpful advice. Remember your reason for attending and why it is important for you. Aftercare: following the procedure, it is a good idea to plan in some time for self-care and self-regulation, some ideas might include ~ Get yourself into a sensory safe space where things feel predictable and calm (for e.g. a quiet room with dim lighting, weighted blanket etc). Arrange to debrief/chat to a friend or another supportive person about your experience after leaving your appointment. Arrange to meet with a trusted person following the procedure to support you with getting back home or perhaps to do something you might enjoy together. Engage in your dedicated interest. Acknowledge your achievement in attending and getting through the appointment. Journal about your experience to help with emotional processing. Engage in your favourite stim to release any tension that may remain in your b0dy. Allow yourself to physically rest or sleep once back at home. Date: 15/12/22
NREM Stage N1 This stage of non-REM sleep is the typical transition from wakefulness to sleep and generally lasts only a few minutes. Stage N1 is the lightest stage of sleep; patients awakened from it usually don’t perceive that they were actually asleep During this stage: Eye movements are typically slow and rolling. heartbeat and breathing slow down muscles begin to relax you produce low amplitude mixed frequencies waves in the theta range (4 to 7 Hz) NREM Stage N2 This next stage of non-REM sleep comprises the largest percentage of total sleep time and is considered a lighter stage of sleep from which you can be awakened easily. This is the stage before you enter deep sleep. During this stage: heartbeat and breathing slow down further no eye movements body temperature drops Sleep spindles and K-complexes are two distinct brain wave features that appear for the first time NREM Stage N3 This final stage of non-REM sleep is the deepest sleep stage. Stage N3 sleep is known as slow-wave, or delta, sleep. Your body performs a variety of important health-promoting tasks in this final non-REM stage. During this stage: arousal from sleep is difficult heartbeat and breathing are at their slowest rate no eye movements body is fully relaxed delta brain waves are present tissue repair and growth, and cell regeneration occurs immune system strengthens REM Stage R There are two phases of REM sleep: phasic and tonic. Phasic REM sleep contains bursts of rapid eye movements, while tonic REM sleep does not. Stage R occurs about 90 minutes after you fall asleep, and is the primary “dreaming” stage of sleep. Stage R sleep lasts roughly 10 minutes the first time, increasing with each REM cycle. The final cycle of stage R may last roughly between 30 to 60 minutes. During this stage: eye movements become rapid during phasic REM breathing and heart rate increases and become more variable muscles become paralyzed, but twitches may occur brain activity is markedly increased When you fall asleep at night, you cycle through all of these stages of sleep multiple times — roughly every 90 minutes or so.
December 8, 2010 / Sleep Snoring is caused by breathing in air through a partially blocked airway. As you fall asleep, the muscles that keep your breathing passage open begin to relax while your throat contracts. The vibrating tissue produces the sound familiarly known as snoring. And whether a given person awakens to their own snores may also vary from night to night. A reflex in the upper airway prevents this collapse and keeps windpipes open when you’re awake. But when you’re asleep, that reflex isn’t as strong. The upper airway tends to partially collapse, and breathing becomes noisier. Snoring can be an occasional occurrence or something that happens on a regular basis. As the air forces through, causes soft tissues in mouth, nose and throat to bump into one other and vibrate. During sleep, the airways tend to narrow, which may cause increased airflow resistance. Tightening causing include increased exposure to allergens; cooling of the airways; being in a reclining position; and hormone secretions that follow a circadian pattern. Sleep itself may even cause changes in bronchial function. The vibration of relaxed throat tissues during sleep causes snoring. During sleep, the muscles loosen, narrowing the airway. As a person inhales and/or exhales, the moving air causes tissue to flutter thus make noise. Some people are more prone to snoring because of the size and shape of the muscles and tissues in their neck. In other cases, excess relaxing of the tissue or narrowing of the airway can lead to snoring.
Key messages People have a right to expect: access to the care they need, when they need it and that appropriate reasonable adjustments are made to meet people’s individual needs. This starts from the first point of contact with a hospital. This is not just good practice – it is a legal requirement. staff communicate with them in a way that meets their needs and involves them in decisions about their care they are fully involved in their care and treatment the care and treatment they receive meets all their needs, including making reasonable adjustments where necessary and taking into account any equality characteristics such as age, race and orientation their experiences of care are not dependent on whether or not they have access to specialist teams and practitioners. However: People told us they found it difficult to access care because reasonable adjustments weren't always made. Providers need to make sure they are making appropriate reasonable adjustments to meet people’s individual needs. There is no ‘one-size-fits-all’ solution for communication. Providers need to make sure that staff have the tools and skills to enable them to communicate effectively to meet people’s individual needs. People are not being fully involved in their care and treatment. In many cases, this is because there is not enough listening, communication and involvement. Providers need to make sure that staff have enough time and skills to listen to people and their families so they understand and can meet people’s individual needs. Equality characteristics, such as age, race and orientation, risked being overshadowed by a person’s learning disability or autism because staff lacked knowledge and understanding about inequalities. Providers need to ensure that staff have appropriate training and knowledge so they can meet all of a person’s individual needs. Specialist practitioners and teams cannot hold sole responsibility for improving people’s experiences of care. Providers must make sure that all staff have up-to-date training and the right skills to care for people with a learning disability and autistic people.
𝐹𝑎𝑟 𝑏𝑒𝑦𝑜𝑛𝑑 𝑡ℎ𝑒 𝑠𝑢𝑛𝑠𝑒𝑡, 𝑏𝑢𝑡 𝑛𝑒𝑣𝑒𝑟 𝑓𝑎𝑟 𝑓𝑟𝑜𝑚 𝑜𝑢𝑟 𝑙𝑜𝑣𝑒 ᥫ᭡.
Never Forgotten ❤ ♥ ꧁꧂
Cͨaͣrͬdͩiͥoͦрⷬhͪoͦвⷡiͥaͣ (feͤaͣrͬ oͦf hͪeͤaͣrͬᴛⷮ dͩiͥs͛eͤaͣs͛eͤ oͦrͬ hͪeͤaͣrͬᴛⷮ aͣᴛⷮᴛⷮaͣcͨᴋⷦs͛). нⷩeͤmͫoͦрⷬhͪoͦвⷡiͥaͣ (feͤaͣrͬ oͦf вⷡloͦoͦdͩ). Noͦs͛oͦcͨoͦmͫeͤрⷬhͪoͦвⷡiͥaͣ (feͤaͣrͬ oͦf hͪoͦs͛рⷬiͥᴛⷮaͣls͛). Рⷬhͪaͣrͬmͫaͣcͨoͦрⷬhͪoͦвⷡiͥaͣ (feͤaͣrͬ oͦf mͫeͤdͩiͥcͨaͣᴛⷮiͥoͦn). ᴛⷮoͦmͫoͦрⷬhͪoͦвⷡiͥaͣ (feͤaͣrͬ oͦf mͫeͤdͩiͥcͨaͣl рⷬrͬoͦcͨeͤdͩuͧrͬeͤs͛ liͥᴋⷦeͤ s͛uͧrͬgeͤrͬiͥeͤs͛). ᴛⷮrͬaͣuͧmͫaͣᴛⷮoͦрⷬhͪoͦвⷡiͥaͣ (feͤaͣrͬ oͦf iͥnjuͧrͬy).
~ ★.   °  ¸. * ● ¸ .    ° ☾ °  ¸. ● ¸ .  ★ ° :.  . • °   .  * :. . ¸ . ● ¸    ★  ★☾ °★ .     .  °☆  . ● ¸ .   ★ ° .  • ○ ° ★  .        * .  ☾ °  ¸. * ● ¸     ° ☾ °☆  . * ¸.   ★
💉 🩹 💉 🩹 💉 🩹 💉 🩹
ᴳᴵᴿᴸ'ᔆ ᶠᴬᵀᴬᴸ ᶠᴬᴸᴸ ᴵᴺᵀᴼ ᴾᴼᴼᴸ ᔆʸᴰᴺᴱʸ⸴ ‧ ᵀᵘᵉˢᵈᵃʸ‧ — ᴰᵒʳᵉᵉⁿ ᵂᵃᵗˢᶠᵒʳᵈ⸴ ¹²⸴ ᵒᶠ ᴾᵃᶜⁱᶠⁱᶜ ᴴⁱᵍʰʷᵃʸ⸴ ᴮᵉʳᵒʷʳᵃ⸴ ᶠᵉˡˡ ³⁰ ᶠᵉᵉᵗ ᵈᵒʷⁿ ᵇᵉˡᵒʷ ⁿᵉᵃʳ ᵃ ʷᵃᵗᵉʳᶠᵃˡˡ ᵃᵗ ᴮᵉʳᵒʷʳᵃ ᵗᵒ⁻ᵈᵃʸ‧ ᔆʰᵉ ʷᵃˢ ᶜˡⁱᵐᵇⁱⁿᵍ ᵒᵛᵉʳ ˢᵒᵐᵉ ᵐᵒˢˢ ᶜᵒᵛᵉʳᵉᵈ ʳᵒᶜᵏˢ ⁿᵉᵃʳ ᵂᵃᵗᵉʳᶠᵃˡˡ ʷʰᵉⁿ ˢʰᵉ ˢˡⁱᵖᵖᵉᵈ ᵃⁿᵈ ᶠᵉˡˡ ⁱⁿᵗᵒ ʷᵃᵗᵉʳ ³⁰ ᶠᵉᵉᵗ ᵇᵉˡᵒʷ‧ ᵂʰⁱˡᵉ ᶠᵃˡˡⁱⁿᵍ⸴ ᶠᵒˡⁱᵃᵍᵉ ᵍʳᵒʷⁱⁿᵍ ᶠʳᵒᵐ ʳᵒᶜᵏˢ ᵇʳᵒᵏᵉ ʰᵉʳ ᶜʰⁱⁿ ᵃⁿᵈ ᵉᵛᵉⁿ ʰᵉʳ ʷⁱⁿᵈᵖⁱᵖᵉ‧ ᶠᵃᵗᵃˡ ᶠᵃˡˡ ᴰᵒʷⁿ ᴳᵒʳᵍᵉ — — — ^ — — — ᔆʸᵈⁿᵉʸ⸴ ᴶᵘⁿᵉ ²⁹‧— ᶠᵃᵗᵃˡ ⁱⁿʲᵘʳⁱᵉˢ ʷᵉʳᵉ ʳᵉᶜᵉⁱᵛᵉᵈ ᵇʸ ᴰᵒʳᵉᵉⁿ ᵂᵃᵗˢᶠᵒʳᵈ ⁽¹²⁾ ʷʰᵉⁿ ˢʰᵉ ᶠᵉˡˡ ³⁵ ᶠᵗ‧ ᵈᵒʷⁿ ᵃ ᵍᵒʳᵍᵉ ᵃᵗ ᴮᵒʳᵒʷʳᵃ ᵗᵒ⁻ᵈᵃʸ‧ ᔆʰᵉ ʷᵃˢ ʷᵃˡᵏⁱⁿᵍ ᵗʰʳᵒᵘᵍʰ ᵗʰᵉ ᵇᵘˢʰ ʷⁱᵗʰ ʰᵉʳ ᶜᵒᵘˢⁱⁿ ʷʰᵉⁿ ʰᵉʳ ᶠᵒᵒᵗ ˢˡⁱᵖᵖᵉᵈ ᵒⁿ ᵃ ʳᵒᶜᵏ ᵃᵗ ᵗʰᵉ ᵉⁿᵈ ᵒᶠ ᵗʰᵉ ᵍᵒʳᵍᵉ‧ ᴬ ˢʰᵃʳᵖ ᵖⁱᵉᶜᵉ ᵒᶠ ᵃ ᵗʳᵉᵉ ᵖᵉⁿᵉᵗʳᵃᵗᵉᵈ‧ ᴴᵉʳ ʲᵃʷ ʷᵃˢ ᶠʳᵃᶜᵗᵘʳᵉᵈ ᵃⁿᵈ ˢʰᵉ ᵖᵃˢˢᵉᵈ ˢʰᵒʳᵗˡʸ ᵃᶠᵗᵉʳ ᵃⁿ ᵃᵐᵇᵘˡᵃⁿᶜᵉ ʰᵃᵈ ᵗᵃᵏᵉⁿ ʰᵉʳ ᵗᵒ ᵗʰᵉ ᴴᵒʳⁿˢᵇʸ ᴴᵒˢᵖⁱᵗᵃˡ
.・。.・゜✭・.・✫・゜・。. 𝒴ℴ𝓊 𝒶𝓇ℯ 𝓁ℴ𝓋ℯ𝒹 .・。.・゜✭・.・✫・゜・。.
💤✉️🏹🌙🍼🥛
∩――――――∩ || ໒꒰⁠ ྀི 。◞ ˔ ◟ ꒱ྀི 𐰁ᶻz | ノ  ̄ ̄୨୧ ̄ ̄\ ノ     \ \  || ̄ ̄ ♡ ̄ ̄ ||   \ ノ||―――――――||
July 1996 . Twins can be conjoined at the: Abdomen (omphalopagus). Chest (thoracopagus). Top of head down to the belly button, facing each other (cephalopagus). Head only (craniopagus). Pelvis, facing each other (ischiopagus). Pelvis, side-to-side (parapagus). Rump-to-rump (pygopagus). Vertebral column (rachipagus). Generally, parapagus are conjoined at the upper chest. Parapagus, united laterally, always share a conjoined pelvis with one or two sacrums and one symphysis pubis. Dithoracic parapagus is when the two chests are separated, and the fusion is confined to the pelvis and abdomen. Dicephalic parapagus is if there is the union of the entire trunk but not the heads. The heart, liver, and diaphragm are fused, but there is a duplication of the respiratory tract and upper digestive tract; the viscera organs are fused. There are two arms, two legs, and two complete vertebral column and spinal cord. The number of limbs varies from 4 to 7, rarely with four legs. Generally, each lung is present in a separate lung cavity. The fusion of lungs is very rare. The alignment of the conjoined pelvis is diagnostic-one complete pelvic ring, with a single anterior pubic symphysis, and with two laterally fused sacral bones, and predominantly only one rectum. Ischiopagi are united ventrally extending from the umbilicus down to a sizeable conjoined pelvis with two symphyses pubis and two sacrum. Craniopagus can be united at any portion of the skull except at the face and the foramen magnum. Pygopagus varieties are joined dorsally; sharing the sacrococcygeal and perineal regions, sometimes even involving the spinal cord. Rachipagus twins are united dorsally above the sacrum. The union may also include the occiput. The cephalopagus varients are fused from the umbilicus to the top of the head. The pelvis and lower abdomen are usually not fused. Thoracopagus are united face-to-face from the upper thorax down till the umbilicus. Omphalopagus are primarily United at the umbilical region aligned face to face. The pelvis is not united. The pure parapagus is two heads, two hands, two legs, two hearts and two pairs of lungs. Conjoined twins are classified on the basis of the union's site, with the suffix pagus meaning fixed or fastened. The twins can have four (tetrapus), three (tripus), or two (bipus) legs. Cephalopagus: The twins often have a fused thorax in addition to a fused head. The single fused head may have two faces (janiceps) Cephalothoracopagus twinning is characterized by the anterior union of the upper half of the body, with two faces angulated variably on a conjoined head. The anomaly is occasionally known as janiceps, named after the two-faced Roman god Janus. The prognosis is extremely poor because surgical separation is not an option, in that only a single brain and a single heart are present and the gastrointestinal (GI) tracts are fused. Craniopagus: The conjoined twins share the skull, meninges, and venous sinuses Ischiopagus: The twins may lie face to face or end to end Pygopagus: The twins are joined dorsally, sharing the sacrococcygeal and perineal regions Rachipagus: The twins generally have vertebral anomalies and neural tube defects. Thoracopagus: The twins lie face to face and share the sternum, diaphragm, upper abdomen wall, and liver and have an exomphalos
❤ ❤ 🅴🆃🅴🆁🅽🅰🅻 🅻🅾🆅🅸🅽🅶 🅼🅴🅼🅾🆁🆈 ❤ ♥ﮩ٨ـﮩﮩ٨ـﮩﮩ α♡ѕнαρє∂♡нσℓє♡ιη♡му♡нєαят ﮩﮩـ٨ﮩﮩـ٨ﮩ♥ (✿◠‿◠)
9 Tʜɪɴɢs ʏᴏᴜ ɴᴇᴇᴅ ᴛᴏ ᴅᴏ Author's 𓂀𝕰𝖑𝖎𝖏𝖆𝖍𖣲̸☘♕ :zap: 01/01/22 ┏━━━━•❅•°•❈ - •°•❅•━━━━┓ ┗━━━━•❅•°•❈ - •°•❅•━━━━┛ ┊ ┊ ┊ ┊ ┊ ┊ ┊ ┊ ┊ ┊ ˚✩ ⋆。˚ ✩ ┊ ┊ ┊ ✫ ┊ ┊ ☪⋆ 𝘄𝗲𝗹𝗰𝗼𝗺𝗲, ⒉🄀⒉⒉ ┊ ✫ #hashtag ʕ•ᴥ•ʔ༄ ✯ ⋆ ┊ . ˚ ☾ ❥ ˚✩. ‧₊ ❁ཻུ۪۪.;:୭̥.┊ʟᵉᵗ ᵍᵒ ᵒᶠ ʷʰᵃᵗ ⁱˢ ᵒᵘᵗ ᵒᶠ ʸᵒᵘʳ ᶜᵒⁿᵗʳᵒˡ. ʟᵉᵃʳⁿ ᵗʰᵉ ˡᵉˢˢᵒⁿ. ғᵒʳᵍⁱᵛᵉ ᵗʰᵉ ᵖᵃˢᵗ. ᴀⁿᵈ ᵐᵒᵛᵉ ᵒⁿ. ꒱ ┄─━ ࿅ ༻ ✣ ༺ ࿅ ━─┄ ⋆ ☄. ʙᵉ ᵗʳᵘᵉ ᵗᵒ ʸᵒᵘʳˢᵉˡᶠ. ɴᵒᵗ ᵇʸ ˢᵗʳⁱᵛⁱⁿᵍ ᵗᵒ ᵇᵉ ᵈⁱᶠᶠᵉʳᵉⁿᵗ ᶠʳᵒᵐ ᵉᵛᵉʳʸᵒⁿᵉ ᵉˡˢᵉ, ᵇᵘᵗ ᵇʸ ˢᵗʳⁱᵛⁱⁿᵍ ᵗᵒ ᵇᵉ ʸᵒᵘʳ ᵗʳᵘᵉ ˢᵉˡᶠ. sᵒᵐᵉ ᵗʰⁱⁿᵍˢ ᵃᵇᵒᵘᵗ ʸᵒᵘ ʷⁱˡˡ ᵇᵉ ˢⁱᵐⁱˡᵃʳ ᵗᵒ ᵒᵗʰᵉʳˢ, ᵃⁿᵈ ᵗʰᵃᵗ'ˢ ᶠⁱⁿᵉ. sᵒᵐᵉ ᵗʰⁱⁿᵍˢ ᵃᵇᵒᵘᵗ ʸᵒᵘ ʷⁱˡˡ ᵇᵉ ᵈⁱᶠᶠᵉʳᵉⁿᵗ ᶠʳᵒᵐ ᵒᵗʰᵉʳˢ ᵃⁿᵈ ᵗʰᵃᵗ'ˢ ᶠⁱⁿᵉ ᵗᵒᵒ. ɪᵗ ⁱˢ ᵗʰᵉ ᶜᵒᵐᵇⁱⁿᵃᵗⁱᵒⁿ ᵒᶠ ᵉᵛᵉʳʸᵗʰⁱⁿᵍ ᵗʰᵃᵗ ᵐᵃᵏᵉˢ ʸᵒᵘ ᵘⁿⁱᵠᵘᵉ. ·˚ * :telescope: ┄─━ ࿅ ༻ ✣ ༺ ࿅ ━─┄ ⇢˚⋆ ✎ ˎˊ- " ᴅᵉˢᵖⁱᵗᵉ ᵗʰᵉ ⁿᵘᵐᵇᵉʳ ᵒᶠ ᵗⁱᵐᵉˢ ʸᵒᵘ'ᵛᵉ ᵇᵉᵉⁿ ˡᵉᵗ ᵈᵒʷⁿ, ᶜᵒⁿᵗⁱⁿᵘᵉ ᵗᵒ ᵍⁱᵛᵉ. ɪᵗ'ˢ ʰᵉᵃˡⁱⁿᵍ ᶠᵒʳ ʸᵒᵘʳ ˢᵒᵘˡ ᵇᵉᶜᵃᵘˢᵉ ⁱᵗ ˢᵗᵒᵖˢ ʸᵒᵘ ᶠʳᵒᵐ ᵇᵉⁱⁿᵍ ˢᵉˡᶠ-ᶜᵉⁿᵗᵉʳᵉᵈ ᵃⁿᵈ ˢᵉˡᶠⁱˢʰ. ʙʸ ᵍⁱᵛⁱⁿᵍ, ɪ ᵈᵒⁿ'ᵗ ᵐᵉᵃⁿ ᵗʰⁱⁿᵍˢ. ʏᵒᵘ ᵐᵃʸ ᵍⁱᵛᵉ ʸᵒᵘʳ ᵗⁱᵐᵉ, ˡᵒᵛᵉ, ᵃᵗᵗᵉⁿᵗⁱᵒⁿ, ᵗʳᵘˢᵗ... ᴛʰᵉ ᵖᵒⁱⁿᵗ ⁱˢ, ᵈᵒⁿ'ᵗ ᶠᵒʳᶜᵉ ʸᵒᵘʳˢᵉˡᶠ ᵒᵘᵗ ᵒᶠ ʸᵒᵘʳ ⁿᵃᵗᵘʳᵉ ʲᵘˢᵗ ᵇᵉᶜᵃᵘˢᵉ ʸᵒᵘ'ᵛᵉ ᵇᵉᵉⁿ ˡᵉᵗ ᵈᵒʷⁿ. ɴᵘʳᵗᵘʳᵉ ʸᵒᵘʳ ⁿᵃᵗᵘʳᵉ ᵗᵒ ᵇᵉᶜᵒᵐᵉ ᵗʰᵉ ᵇᵉˢᵗ ᵛᵉʳˢⁱᵒⁿ ᵒᶠ ʸᵒᵘʳˢᵉˡᶠ. ʏᵒᵘ ˡⁱᵛᵉ ᶠᵒʳ ʸᵒᵘʳˢᵉˡᶠ. ɴᵒᵗ ᵃⁿʸᵒⁿᵉ ᵉˡˢᵉ. " ┄─━ ࿅ ༻ ✣ ༺ ࿅ ━─┄ -`, ʏᵒᵘ'ᵛᵉ ᵇᵉᵉⁿ ʰᵘʳᵗ? ɢʳᵉᵃᵗ. ᴛʰᵃᵗ ᵐᵃᵏᵉˢ ʸᵒᵘ ˢᵗʳᵒⁿᵍᵉʳ. ᴀ ᶠᵒʳᵉˢᵗ ᵍʳᵒʷˢ ˢᵗʳᵒⁿᵍᵉʳ ᵃᶠᵗᵉʳ ⁱᵗ'ˢ ᵇʳᵘⁿᵗ ᵈᵒʷⁿ ᵇᵉᶜᵃᵘˢᵉ ⁱᵗ ⁿᵘʳᵗᵘʳᵉˢ ⁱᵗˢᵉˡᶠ ᶠʳᵒᵐ ⁱᵗ ʳᵉᵐⁿᵃⁿᵗˢ. ɴᵒ ᵍʳᵒʷᵗʰ ʰᵃᵖᵖᵉⁿˢ ʷⁱᵗʰᵒᵘᵗ ˢᵗʳᵘᵍᵍˡᵉ ᵃⁿᵈ ʰᵃʳᵈˢʰⁱᵖ. ɪᶠ ʸᵒᵘ ʰᵃᵛᵉⁿ'ᵗ ᵇᵉᵉⁿ ᵗʰʳᵒᵘᵍʰ ˢᵒᵐᵉᵗʰⁱⁿᵍ ᵗʰᵃᵗ ˢʰᵃᵗᵗᵉʳᵉᵈ ʸᵒᵘʳ ˢᵒᵘˡ ʸᵉᵗ, ʸᵒᵘ ʷⁱˡˡ. ᴅᵒⁿ'ᵗ ᵈᵉˡᵃʸ ᵗʰᵉ ᵖᵃⁱⁿ ᵇʸ ᵃᵛᵒⁱᵈⁱⁿᵍ ʳⁱˢᵏˢ. ᴛʰᵉ ˢᵒᵒⁿᵉʳ ʸᵒᵘ ᶠᵉᵉˡ ⁱᵗ, ᵗʰᵉ ˢᵗʳᵒⁿᵍᵉʳ ʸᵒᵘ ᵇᵉᶜᵒᵐᵉ. ꒱ ↷🖇🥛 ┄─━ ࿅ ༻ ✣ ༺ ࿅ ━─┄ ˗ˏ✎*ೃ˚ :email: :; ʟᵒᵛᵉ ᵉᵛᵉʳʸᵒⁿᵉ ᵃʳᵒᵘⁿᵈ ʸᵒᵘ. ᴡᵉ ᵃˡˡ ⁿᵉᵉᵈ ˡᵒᵛᵉ. ᴛʰᵉ ᵒⁿᵉˢ ʷʰᵒ ⁿᵉᵉᵈ ⁱᵗ ᵐᵒˢᵗ ᵃʳᵉ ᵗʰᵉ ᵒⁿᵉˢ ʷʰᵒ ᵉˣᵖʳᵉˢˢ ⁱᵗ ˡᵉᵃˢᵗ. sᵒ ᵈᵒⁿ'ᵗ ᵖᵘⁿⁱˢʰ ᵃ ᵖᵉʳˢᵒⁿ ᶠᵒʳ ᵇᵉⁱⁿᵍ ᵘⁿᵏⁱⁿᵈ ᵒʳ ˢᵉˡᶠⁱˢʰ ᵇʸ ᵗᵃᵏⁱⁿᵍ ʸᵒᵘʳ ᵏⁱⁿᵈⁿᵉˢˢ ᵃⁿᵈ ˡᵒᵛᵉ ᵃʷᵃʸ. ɪᵗ'ˢ ʷʰᵃᵗ ᵗʰᵉʸ ⁿᵉᵉᵈ. ᴡⁱˡˡ ᵗᵃᵏⁱⁿᵍ ⁱᵗ ᵃʷᵃʸ ʰᵉˡᵖ ᵗʰᵉᵐ? ɴᵒ. ɪᵗ ᵈᵒᵉˢⁿ'ᵗ ᵐᵉᵃⁿ ʸᵒᵘ'ʳᵉ ⁿᵃⁱᵛᵉ. sᵒᵐᵉᵒⁿᵉ'ˢ ᵃᵇⁱˡⁱᵗʸ ᵒʳ ⁱⁿᵃᵇⁱˡⁱᵗʸ ᵗᵒ ʳᵉᶜⁱᵖʳᵒᶜᵃᵗᵉ ᵍᵒᵒᵈⁿᵉˢˢ ⁱˢ ᵃ ʳᵉᶠˡᵉᶜᵗⁱᵒⁿ ᵒᶠ ᵗʰᵉᵐ. ɴᵒᵗ ʸᵒᵘ. ┄─━ ࿅ ༻ ✣ ༺ ࿅ ━─┄ ༘♡ ᴅᵒⁿ'ᵗ ᶠᵉᵉˡ ᵇᵃᵈ ᶠᵒʳ ˢᵉᵗᵗⁱⁿᵍ ᵇᵒᵘⁿᵈᵃʳⁱᵉˢ ᵗᵒ ᵖʳᵒᵗᵉᶜᵗ ᵗʰᵉ ᵛᵃˡᵘᵉ ᵗʰᵃᵗ ʸᵒᵘ ʰᵃᵛᵉ ʷⁱᵗʰⁱⁿ. ɴᵉᵛᵉʳ ᵇᵉᵗʳᵃʸ ʸᵒᵘʳˢᵉˡᶠ ᵗᵒ ᵖˡᵉᵃˢᵉ ˢᵒᵐᵉᵒⁿᵉ ᵉˡˢᵉ. ɴᵉᵛᵉʳ. ᴛʰᵉʳᵉ'ˢ ᵃ ᵈⁱᶠᶠᵉʳᵉⁿᶜᵉ ᵇᵉᵗʷᵉᵉⁿ ᶜᵒᵐᵖʳᵒᵐⁱˢᵉ ᵃⁿᵈ ᵖᵘᵗᵗⁱⁿᵍ ʸᵒᵘʳˢᵉˡᶠ ᵈᵒʷⁿ. ᴅᵒⁿ'ᵗ ˢᵃʸ ⁿᵒ ᵗᵒ ʸᵒᵘʳˢᵉˡᶠ ᵇʸ ˢᵃʸⁱⁿᵍ ʸᵉˢ ᵗᵒ ˢᵒᵐᵉᵒⁿᵉ ᵉˡˢᵉ. ɪᶠ ˢᵒᵐᵉᵒⁿᵉ ᵍᵉᵗˢ ᵘᵖˢᵉᵗ ᵒᵛᵉʳ ʸᵒᵘ ˢᵉᵗᵗⁱⁿᵍ ᵇᵒᵘⁿᵈᵃʳʸ, ᵗʰᵃᵗ ᵈᵒᵉˢⁿ'ᵗ ᵐᵉᵃⁿ ʸᵒᵘʳ ᵇᵒᵘⁿᵈᵃʳʸ ⁱˢ ʷʳᵒⁿᵍ. ᴛʰᵉʸ'ʳᵉ ᵗʰᵉ ʷʳᵒⁿᵍ ᵖᵉʳˢᵒⁿ ᶠᵒʳ ʸᵒᵘ. ⋆。˚❀ ┄─━ ࿅ ༻ ✣ ༺ ࿅ ━─┄ _ _ ᴏʷⁿ ʸᵒᵘʳ ˢᵗᵒʳʸ. ᴡᵉ ᵉᵃᶜʰ ʰᵃᵛᵉ ᵃ ˢᵗᵒʳʸ. ᴊᵘˢᵗ ᵇᵉᶜᵃᵘˢᵉ ˢᵒᵐᵉᵒⁿᵉ ᵇᵉˡⁱᵗᵗˡᵉˢ ʸᵒᵘʳ ᵖᵃⁱⁿ ᵒʳ ˢᵃʸˢ ⁱᵗ'ˢ ⁱˡˡᵉᵍⁱᵗⁱᵐᵃᵗᵉ, ⁱᵗ ᵈᵒᵉˢⁿ'ᵗ ᵐᵉᵃⁿ ⁱᵗ'ˢ ᵗʳᵘᵉ. ʙᵉ ʸᵒᵘʳ ᵒʷⁿ ʲᵘᵈᵍᵉ ᵇᵉᶠᵒʳᵉ ʸᵒᵘ ᵃˡˡᵒʷ ᵒᵗʰᵉʳˢ ᵗᵒ ᵍⁱᵛᵉ ᵗʰᵉ ᵛᵉʳᵈⁱᶜᵗ. ɪᵗ'ˢ ʸᵒᵘʳ ˡⁱᶠᵉ ᵃⁿᵈ ʸᵒᵘʳ ˡⁱᶠᵉ ᵃˡᵒⁿᵉ. ᴛᵃᵏᵉ ᵒʷⁿᵉʳˢʰⁱᵖ. ᴜⁿᵈᵉʳˢᵗᵃⁿᵈ ʸᵒᵘʳ ᵖᵃⁱⁿ ᵃⁿᵈ ʷʰʸ ⁱᵗ ʰᵃᵖᵖᵉⁿᵉᵈ ᵒʳ ᶜᵒⁿᵗⁱⁿᵘᵉˢ ᵗᵒ ʰᵃᵖᵖᵉⁿ. ᴛʰᵃᵗ ᵃʷᵃʳᵉⁿᵉˢˢ ᵃˡˡᵒʷˢ ʸᵒᵘ ᵗᵒ ᵐᵃˢᵗᵉʳ ʸᵒᵘʳˢᵉˡᶠ. ༉‧₊˚✧ ┄─━ ࿅ ༻ ✣ ༺ ࿅ ━─┄ ꒰ :vhs: ꒱°⁺ ⁀➷ ʟⁱˢᵗᵉⁿ. ᴛᵒ ᵉᵛᵉʳʸᵗʰⁱⁿᵍ ᵃʳᵒᵘⁿᵈ ʸᵒᵘ. ɴᵒᵗ ʲᵘˢᵗ ʷᵒʳᵈˢ. ɴᵒᵗ ʲᵘˢᵗ ᶠʳⁱᵉⁿᵈˢ ᵃⁿᵈ ᶠᵃᵐⁱˡʸ. ʟⁱˢᵗᵉⁿ ᵗᵒ ᵗʰᵉ ʷᵒʳˡᵈ. ᴏᵇˢᵉʳᵛᵉ. ᴡᵒⁿᵈᵉʳ. ᴀˡˡᵒʷ ʸᵒᵘʳ ᵐⁱⁿᵈ ᵗᵒ ᵗʰᵉ ˢᵃⁱˡ ⁱⁿ ᵗʰᵉ ᵒᶜᵉᵃⁿ ᵒᶠ ᶜᵘʳⁱᵒˢⁱᵗʸ ᵃⁿᵈ ᵐᵃʳᵛᵉˡ ᵃᵗ ᵗʰᵉ ˢⁱᵐᵖˡᵉˢᵗ ᵗʰⁱⁿᵍˢ. ᴛʰᵃᵗ ʰᵘᵐᵇˡᵉˢ ʸᵒᵘ. ┄─━ ࿅ ༻ ✣ ༺ ࿅ ━─┄ ۪۫❁ཻུ۪۪┊ᴅᵒⁿ'ᵗ ᶠᵉᵉˡ ᵃˢʰᵃᵐᵉᵈ ᵒᶠ ʸᵒᵘʳ ᵉᵐᵒᵗⁱᵒⁿˢ. ᴄʳʸ ʷʰᵉⁿ ʸᵒᵘ ᶠᵉᵉˡ ᵗʰᵉ ᵘʳᵍᵉ ᵗᵒ ᶜʳʸ. ʟᵃᵘᵍʰ ᵒᶠᵗᵉⁿ. ᴇᵃᵗ ʷᵉˡˡ. ʀᵉˢᵗ ʷᵉˡˡ. ᴡᵒʳᵏ ʰᵃʳᵈ ᵇᵘᵗ ᵗᵃᵏᵉ ᵃ ᵇʳᵉᵃᵏ ᵇᵉᶠᵒʳᵉ ʸᵒᵘ ᵇᵘʳⁿ ᵒᵘᵗ. ʙᵉ ⁱⁿᵗᵉⁿᵗⁱᵒⁿᵃˡ ʷⁱᵗʰ ᵗʰᵉ ʳᵉˢᵗ ʸᵒᵘ ᵍⁱᵛᵉ ʸᵒᵘʳˢᵉˡᶠ. ɪᵗ'ˢ ᵒᵏᵃʸ ᵗᵒ ᵍⁱᵛᵉ ʸᵒᵘʳ ᵇᵒᵈʸ ᵗⁱᵐᵉ ᵗᵒ ʳᵉᶜʰᵃʳᵍᵉ. ˎˊ˗ ๑۞๑,¸¸,ø¤º°`°๑۩ - ๑۩ ,¸¸,ø¤º°`°๑۞๑
𝓛𝓮𝓽 𝓽𝓱𝓮𝓶 𝓴𝓮𝓮𝓹 𝔀𝓱𝓪𝓽 𝓽𝓱𝓮𝔂 𝓽𝓸𝓸𝓴 𝓯𝓻𝓸𝓶 𝔂𝓸𝓾 Author's 𓂀𝕰𝖑𝖎𝖏𝖆𝖍𖣲̸☘♕ :zap: 09/23/21 𝙸𝚏 𝚢𝚘𝚞 𝚐𝚊𝚟𝚎 𝚝𝚑𝚎𝚖 𝚕𝚘𝚟𝚎 𝚊𝚗𝚍 𝚝𝚑𝚎𝚢 𝚠𝚊𝚕𝚔𝚎𝚍 𝚊𝚠𝚊𝚢, 𝚕𝚎𝚝 𝚝𝚑𝚎𝚖 𝚔𝚎𝚎𝚙 𝚒𝚝. 𝙸𝚏 𝚢𝚘𝚞 𝚐𝚊𝚟𝚎 𝚝𝚑𝚎𝚖 𝚝𝚒𝚖𝚎 𝚊𝚗𝚍 𝚝𝚑𝚎𝚢 𝚠𝚊𝚕𝚔𝚎𝚍 𝚊𝚠𝚊𝚢, 𝚕𝚎𝚝 𝚝𝚑𝚎𝚖 𝚔𝚎𝚎𝚙 𝚝𝚑𝚎 𝚖𝚎𝚖𝚘𝚛𝚒𝚎𝚜. 𝙸𝚏 𝚢𝚘𝚞 𝚐𝚊𝚟𝚎 𝚝𝚑𝚎𝚖 𝚍𝚊𝚢𝚜, 𝚠𝚎𝚎𝚔𝚜 𝚘𝚛 𝚎𝚟𝚎𝚗 𝚢𝚎𝚊𝚛𝚜 𝚘𝚏 𝚢𝚘𝚞𝚛 𝚕𝚒𝚏𝚎, 𝚕𝚎𝚝 𝚝𝚑𝚎𝚖 𝚔𝚎𝚎𝚙 𝚊𝚕𝚕 𝚝𝚑𝚎 𝚕𝚘𝚟𝚎 𝚢𝚘𝚞 𝚐𝚊𝚟𝚎 𝚝𝚑𝚎𝚖 𝚍𝚞𝚛𝚒𝚗𝚐 𝚝𝚑𝚊𝚝 𝚝𝚒𝚖𝚎 𝙳𝚘𝚗'𝚝 𝚏𝚒𝚐𝚑𝚝 𝚋𝚊𝚌𝚔 𝚏𝚘𝚛 𝚒𝚝. 𝙳𝚘𝚗'𝚝 𝚜𝚊𝚢 "𝚢𝚘𝚞 𝚘𝚠𝚎 𝚖𝚎". 𝚄𝚗𝚍𝚎𝚛𝚜𝚝𝚊𝚗𝚍 𝚝𝚑𝚊𝚝 𝚝𝚑𝚎 𝚟𝚊𝚕𝚞𝚎 𝚘𝚏 𝚢𝚘𝚞𝚛 𝚕𝚘𝚟𝚎 𝚍𝚘𝚎𝚜 𝚗𝚘𝚝 𝚍𝚎𝚙𝚎𝚗𝚍 𝚘𝚗 𝚠𝚑𝚊𝚝 𝚘𝚝𝚑𝚎𝚛𝚜 𝚍𝚘 𝚠𝚒𝚝𝚑 𝚝𝚑𝚊𝚝 𝚕𝚘𝚟𝚎. 𝙻𝚎𝚝 𝚝𝚑𝚎𝚖 𝚔𝚎𝚎𝚙 𝚠𝚑𝚊𝚝 𝚝𝚑𝚎𝚢 𝚝𝚘𝚘𝚔. 𝚃𝚑𝚎𝚢 𝚖𝚞𝚜𝚝 𝚑𝚊𝚟𝚎 𝚗𝚎𝚎𝚍𝚎𝚍 𝚒𝚝. 𝙸𝚝 𝚖𝚞𝚜𝚝 𝚑𝚊𝚟𝚎 𝚒𝚖𝚙𝚊𝚌𝚝𝚎𝚍 𝚝𝚑𝚎𝚒𝚛 𝚕𝚒𝚟𝚎𝚜. 𝚈𝚘𝚞 𝚌𝚊𝚗'𝚝 𝚝𝚊𝚔𝚎 𝚝𝚑𝚊𝚝 𝚊𝚠𝚊𝚢. 𝙷𝚘𝚠 𝚋𝚎𝚊𝚞𝚝𝚒𝚏𝚞𝚕 𝚒𝚜 𝚝𝚑𝚊𝚝? 𝙴𝚟𝚎𝚗 𝚝𝚑𝚘𝚞𝚐𝚑 𝚝𝚑𝚎𝚢 𝚐𝚊𝚟𝚎 𝚢𝚘𝚞 𝚙𝚊𝚒𝚗 𝚒𝚗 𝚛𝚎𝚝𝚞𝚛𝚗 𝚏𝚘𝚛 𝚢𝚘𝚞𝚛 𝚕𝚘𝚟𝚎, 𝚢𝚘𝚞 𝚜𝚝𝚒𝚕𝚕 𝚕𝚎𝚏𝚝 𝚝𝚑𝚎𝚖 𝚠𝚒𝚝𝚑 𝚕𝚘𝚟𝚎.
Date: 15/12/22 Autistic qualities such as differences in how we understand what our body is feeling (interoception), our experience of pain (hypo/ hyper sensitivity) and difficulties in noticing and identifying how we feel (alexithymia) Nurse practitioners and doctors may have a limited understanding of the unique and significant ways in which autism and its associated issues impact a patient’s experience of a given medical procedure. This means that the particular supports that might help to alleviate discomfort could be lacking. We might encounter resistance to our own attempts to self- regulate and take care of our sensory and emotional needs during the appointment. We may even experience medical gas lighting or invalidation when attempting to express our experience or request much needed accommodations ( we know that this happens at higher rates amongst female presenting people, people of colour and those with additional learning disabilities in our community). For those of us with a history of these types of experiences, just being in a medical environment could feel threatening and unsafe. * Autistic person with a particular set of qualities and traits, this is not a prediction of what others might encounter or an attempt to generalise my own experience to the broader community. Date: 15/12/22
givesmehope: I met a 16 year old genius who was in medical school, studying to be a pediatric neurosurgeon. He put every dollar he made at his job into a retirement fund. Why? He wanted to be able to retire at age 30, so that he could spend the rest of his life performing brain surgeries for free. His philanthropy GMH. Mar 5 2010
🛏️🍼🌸🌺✨💤🧸🐼💭🥛🐇🍪💫⭐🌙
𝙎𝙤𝙢𝙚𝙤𝙣𝙚 𝙨𝙤 𝙨𝙥𝙚𝙘𝙞𝙖𝙡 𝙘𝙖𝙣 𝙣𝙚𝙫𝙚𝙧 𝙗𝙚 𝙛𝙤𝙧𝙜𝙤𝙩𝙩𝙚𝙣 𝙢𝙖𝙮 𝙮𝙤𝙪𝙧 𝙨𝙤𝙪𝙡 𝙧𝙚𝙨𝙩 𝙞𝙣 𝙥𝙚𝙖𝙘𝙚 ♡❁♡
💉 💊 💉 💊 🏩 💊 🩹 👁 🩹
ᔆᵃⁱⁿᵗ ᴮᵃˢⁱˡˡⁱˢᵃ ᴹᵉᵐᵒʳⁱᵃˡ ⁶ ᴶᵃⁿᵘᵃʳʸ ᴾʳᵒᶠⁱˡᵉ ᴹᵃʳʳⁱᵉᵈ ᶜʰᵃˢᵗᵉˡʸ ᵗᵒ ᔆᵃⁱⁿᵗ ᴶᵘˡⁱᵃⁿ‧ ᵀʰᵉ ᵗʷᵒ ᶜᵒⁿᵛᵉʳᵗᵉᵈ ᵗʰᵉⁱʳ ʰᵒᵐᵉ ⁱⁿᵗᵒ ᵃ ʰᵒˢᵖⁱᵗᵃˡ ʷʰⁱᶜʰ ᶜᵒᵘˡᵈ ʰᵒᵘˢᵉ ᵘᵖ ᵗᵒ ¹⸴⁰⁰⁰! ᴮᵃˢⁱˡⁱˢˢᵃ ᶜᵃʳᵉᵈ ᶠᵒʳ ˢⁱᶜᵏ ʷᵒᵐᵉⁿ ⁱⁿ ᵒⁿᵉ ʷⁱⁿᵍ⸴ ᴶᵘˡⁱᵃⁿ ᵗʰᵉ ᵐᵉⁿ ⁱⁿ ᵃⁿᵒᵗʰᵉʳ‧ ᴰⁱᵉᵈ ᵒᶠ ⁿᵃᵗᵘʳᵃˡ ᶜᵃᵘˢᵉˢ ᶜᵃⁿᵒⁿⁱᶻᵉᵈ ᴾʳᵉ⁻ᶜᵒⁿᵍʳᵉᵍᵃᵗⁱᵒⁿ
Sleepcore : 😴😪🌛🌜🌚🌝🌙✨💫🌟⭐🌠💤📟🛏️🧸🌀💭🥛🍼🍪🐑🪫⏰✡️🌀☪️ Dreamcore :😶‍🌫️💤🌈👁️🌻🍄🫧☀️💫🗝☁️🕳️🔮🪬🔍📅💿📞🎭🖼️🪄👾🎱🪩⛓️🧚👼 Gorecore/bloodcore : 🧠🫀🫁🩸🦷🦴💀🥩🍖🩻⚰️🪦 Lovecore: 🫀❤️‍🔥❤️‍🩹❣️💟💔💘💝💖💗💓💞💕💌♥️❤️🧡💛💚💙💜🤎🖤🤍😻🥰😘😍😚💏👩‍❤️‍💋‍👨👨‍❤️‍💋‍👨👩‍❤️‍💋‍👩💑👩‍❤️‍👨👨‍❤️‍👨👩‍❤️‍👩🧑‍🤝‍🧑👭👬👫🌹💐🍓🍫💒🏩🎁🎀🧚👼 Kidcore : 🌈💫🍓🍬🍭🧁🍪🧃🍰🏫🎂🪅🧩🪁🎨🖍️🎭🧸🧮🪢🪆🎒🩹✏️🚼🎠🦄🪀🪃🫧🪩🧚🛼🩰🥏 Cutecore : 🧸🍰🌈🍓🍬🍭🧁🍪 🌸💮🪷🌷🌺🐇🍼🎀💌❤️💟🍡🍙🍥🧚 Weirdcore : 🌈🍄🌀💫🎊🧩📺📽️🖼️🎭📞🚪💊🧿☯️⚕️👁️‍🗨️👁️🩸🫧💉🧚👼 Clowncore : 🤡🤪🥳🔴🎉🎊🎈🎂🎀🎁🪅🎪🎠🎡🎢🖍️ 📌🔖🔮🍿🍭🍬🍦🤹🤹‍♀️🤹‍♂️🪀🃏🎱🎲🎭🎟️🐒🐘🐎🦁🩰🛼🎯🗡️💣 Angelcore : 🌹☁️💫👼🐚🕊️🕯️💌🪬👁️📜🪦🛡️🍙🍚🍥🌫️🌪️🌬️⭐🐇🦢⛪ Partycore : 🥳🤩😵‍💫🎉🎊🎈🎂🎀🎁🪅🎯🛹🛼🧩🎮🕹️👾🀄🪁🎲🎱🎨🖌️🎧🎭🎬🛍️ Webcore/Internetcore : 📱📟📠🔌🔋🪫💽💾💿📀🖥️💻⌨️🖨️🖱️🪙⚙️🪪📈🔍🧑‍💻👩‍💻👨‍💻🌀🌌🎮🕹️👾
💊🩹🩺💉🩸
🧸💤🌙☁️🥛🌀✨
💫🥛💤⭐🍦🍪🐇🌙🌀🧸🍼📺🍭💭🛏️🧦💭🌟
💤🥛🌌🌙☁️💙🧸🛏✨💫
   ∧∧  ( ・ω・)   _| ⊃/(___  / └-(____/  ̄ ̄ ̄ ̄ ̄ ̄ ̄   <,⌒/ヽ-___ /<,3/____/
💉 ❤️‍🩹 💉 ❤️‍🩹 💉 ❤️‍🩹 💉 ❤️‍🩹 💉
🧸🌙🎧🥛💤🍪💭💫🌀🍼🖇📼☁️
🏩🩹🫁🎈🧸💉🔪💀🕷️🩰🫀🦠🩸⚕️🔮👁️‍🗨️
✩。:*•.───── ❁ ❁ ─────.•*:。✩ ♡ "𝑈𝑛𝑡𝑖𝑙 𝑤𝑒 𝑚𝑒𝑒𝑡 𝑎𝑔𝑎𝑖𝑛 𝑦𝑜𝑢 𝑤𝑖𝑙𝑙 𝑙𝑖𝑣𝑒 𝑜𝑛 𝑓𝑜𝑟𝑒𝑣𝑒𝑟 𝑖𝑛 𝑚𝑦 ℎ𝑒𝑎𝑟𝑡." ♡. ✩。:*•.───── ❁ ❁ ─────.•*:。✩
ꕤ*.゚♡┊𝕀 𝕤𝕥𝕒𝕪, 𝕀 𝕡𝕣𝕒𝕪. 𝕊𝕖𝕖 𝕪𝕠𝕦 𝕚𝕟 𝕙𝕖𝕒𝕧𝕖𝕟 𝕠𝕟𝕖 𝕕𝕒𝕪┊ ꕤ*.゚♡
ʚ♡ɞ 𝐀𝐧𝐠𝐞𝐥𝐬 𝐡𝐚𝐝 𝐥𝐨𝐯𝐞𝐝 𝐲𝐨𝐮 𝐬𝐨 𝐝𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐥𝐲 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐲 𝐭𝐨𝐨𝐤 𝐲𝐨𝐮 𝐭𝐨 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐯𝐞𝐧. 𝐌𝐚𝐲 𝐲𝐨𝐮𝐫 𝐞𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐧𝐚𝐥 𝐣𝐨𝐮𝐫𝐧𝐞𝐲 𝐛𝐞 𝐟𝐮𝐥𝐥 𝐨𝐟 𝐥𝐨𝐯𝐞 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐠𝐫𝐚𝐜𝐞 ༊*·˚
๑❤๑♥๑ "In all things of nature, there is something of the marvelous." — Aristotle ๑❤๑♥๑ ꧁꧂
..ღ❤❤•❤ღDAUGHTERღ❤•❤❤ღ..
ʕuᴥuʔ。。。💤
♡💫🥛💤⭐🍪🌙🌀🧸🍼💭🛏️✰
💤🧁🌸🍦🍼🍭🧸🐇🎀😴🍪
🦋💤😴🔮🌊
Tumblr | 10/6/2014 | 7:44pm | DO YOU? meeplol: Most people agree that dying while being asleep is the best way to dıe. Peaceful, not signs of tortur͘e nor paın. My grandma used to say angels carry them, the ones who are dying while being asleep, to heaven. But sometimes angels can be clumsy and drop them by accident. Remember the time you felt like falling in your sleep and suddenly woke up?
⚕️🏩💉🚑🩻🦴🩺🩹💊
Sleepıng on your side or back will help alleviate neck paın, according to Harvard Health. If you're on your back, you'll want a rounded pillow under your neck for support. If you're on your side, you'll also want a pillow directly under your neck for support so your spine stays neutral. There are a couple of sleeping options if you have ear paın. The Cleveland Clinic advises you to sleep on the opposite side of the ear giving you trouble. You also want to sleep slightly elevated so that you're taking off any of the pressure from your inner ear. If you have a cøld or the flu, try sleeping on your back but with your head propped up. This can help keep your sinuses from becoming more congested than they probably are and can help you rest easier. According to Keck Medicine of USC, the best sleeping position for lower back paın is to lie on your back so your spine stays neutral. For lower back paın specifically, it can also help to use a pillow under your knees so that your legs aren't pulling on your spine. For those who wake up in the morning with hip paın or who find their hip paın exacerbated by the way they're sleepıng, try sleepıng on your back. You can also sleep on the opposite side of the hip that's giving you trouble, the Center for Spine and Orthopedics suggests. You should also put a pillow between your knees to take some pressure off your joints. Back sleepıng and side sleepıng can both help with knee paın, though back sleepıng is generally more recommended. If you're sleepıng on your back, the Arthritis Foundation recommends placing pillows under your knees to take any pressure off. If you choose to sleep on your side, place a pillow between your knees. Sleepıng on your back can help with perıods paın. This position, especially with a pillow under your knees, takes the pressure off your stomach and organs, as well as your back — all of which can help ease cramping.
❤ 𝓐𝓵𝔀𝓪𝔂𝓼 𝓪𝓷𝓭 𝓕𝓸𝓻𝓮𝓿𝓮𝓻 ❤
November 17, 2013 It's hard to forget Someone who gave you So much to remember.
If you love something let it go, If it comes back to you it's yours, If it doesn't, it never was, and it's not meant to be. May 6, 2014
Procedural Pain Management Vaccinations are the most common source of procedural pain for healthy children and can be a stressful experience for persons of any age. It has been estimated that up to 25% of adults have a fear of needles, with most needle fears developing during childhood. If not addressed, these fears can have long-term effects such as preprocedural anxiety. Inject Vaccines Rapidly Without Aspiration Aspiration is not recommended before administering a vaccine. Aspiration prior to injection and injecting medication slowly are practices that have not been evaluated scientifically. Aspiration was originally recommended for theoretical safety reasons and injecting medication slowly was thought to decrease pain from sudden distention of muscle tissue. Aspiration can increase pain because of the combined effects of a longer needle-dwelling time in the tissues and shearing action (wiggling) of the needle. There are no reports of any person being injured because of failure to aspirate. The veins and arteries within reach of a needle in the anatomic areas recommended for vaccination are too small to allow an intravenous push of vaccine without blowing out the vessel. A 2007 study from Canada compared infants’ pain response using slow injection, aspiration, and slow withdrawal with another group using rapid injection, no aspiration, and rapid withdrawal. Based on behavioral and visual pain scales, the group that received the vaccine rapidly without aspiration experienced less pain. No immediate adverse events were reported with either injection technique. Inject Vaccines that Cause the Most Pain Last Many persons receive two or more injections at the same clinical visit. Some vaccines cause more pain than others during the injection. Because pain can increase with each injection, the order in which vaccines are injected matters. Some vaccines cause a painful or stinging sensation when injected; examples include measles, mumps, and rubella; pneumococcal conjugate; and human papillomavirus vaccines. Injecting the most painful vaccine last when multiple injections are being administered can decrease the pain associated with the injections. Pain Relievers Topical anesthetics block transmission of pain signals from the skin. They decrease the pain as the needle penetrates the skin and reduce the underlying muscle spasm, particularly when more than one injection is administered. These products should be used only for the ages recommended and as directed by the manufacturer. Because using topical anesthetics may require additional time, some planning by the healthcare provider and parent may be needed. Topical anesthetics can be applied during the usual clinic waiting times, or before the patient arrives at the clinic provided parents and patients have been shown how to use them appropriately. There is no evidence that topical anesthetics have an adverse effect on the vaccine immune response. The prophylactic use of antipyretics (e.g., acetaminophen and ibuprofen) before or at the time of vaccination is not recommended. There is no evidence these will decrease the pain associated with an injection. In addition, some studies have suggested these medications might suppress the immune response to some vaccine antigens. Follow Age-Appropriate Positioning Best Practices For both children and adults, the best position and type of comforting technique should be determined by considering the patient’s age, activity level, safety, comfort, and administration route and site. Parents play an important role when infants and children receive vaccines. Parent participation has been shown to increase a child’s comfort and reduce the child’s perception of pain. Holding infants during vaccination reduces acute distress. Skin-to-skin contact for infants up to age 1 month has been demonstrated to reduce acute distress during the procedure. A parent’s embrace during vaccination offers several benefits. A comforting hold: Avoids frightening children by embracing them rather than overpowering them Allows the health care professional steady control of the limb and the injection site Prevents children from moving their arms and legs during injections Encourages parents to nurture and comfort their child A combination of interventions, holding during the injection along with patting or rocking after the injection, is recommended for children up to age 3 years. Parents should understand proper positioning and holding for infants and young children. Parents should hold the child in a comfortable position, so that one or more limbs are exposed for injections. Research shows that children age 3 years or older are less fearful and experience less pain when receiving an injection if they are sitting up rather than lying down. The exact mechanism behind this phenomenon is unknown. It may be that the child’s anxiety level is reduced, which, in turn, reduces the child’s perception of pain. Tactile Stimulation Moderate tactile stimulation (rubbing or stroking the skin) near the injection site before and during the injection process may decrease pain in children age 4 years or older and in adults. The mechanism for this is thought to be that the sensation of touch competes with the feeling of pain from the injection and, thereby, results in less pain. Route and Site for Vaccination The recommended route and site for each vaccine are based on clinical trials, practical experience, and theoretical considerations. There are five routes used to administer vaccines. Deviation from the recommended route may reduce vaccine efficacy or increase local adverse reactions. Some vaccine doses are not valid if administered using the wrong route, and revaccination is recommended. Acknowledgements The editors would like to acknowledge Beth Hibbs and Andrew Kroger for their contributions to this chapter.
r/TwoSentenceHorror 10 hr. ago Throwayajustcus ‎ ‎ ‎ ‎ ‎ ‎ ‎ ‎ ↓ˢᶜʳᵒˡˡ ᶠᵒʳ ˢᵗᵒʳʸ↓ And just like that, the last star in the Universe whimpered goodnight and left an infinite darkness in it's place. Of all my memories, the one I see most often as I drift through the endless cosmos is the look of pity on the genies face when I told him I wanted to live forever..
Consider these tips to mentally prepare for your exam: Use relaxation techniques or distraction. Relaxation techniques, such as deep breathing, guided imagery and mindfulness, can be beneficial leading up to and during your exam. Also, throughout the exam, you can close your eyes, inhale through your nose for four seconds and then exhale through your mouth for four seconds. You may want to listen to music or watch a video to distract your mind. You also can bring a partner, family member or friend to talk to during the process. Talk to your health care provider. Let your provider know you are nervous and explain how you are feeling. Ask as many questions as you need and seek advice on how to make the exam easier, such as different positions and/or using a smaller speculum to ease discomfort or pain. You can ask your provider to talk you through the exam step by step so that you are prepared for what is about to happen. If you have health anxiety, fear of the unknown or body dysmorphia, it's important to let your provider know so he or she can help you through the exam. Say "stop" if you are in pain. You can ask your provider to stop at any time if you are uncomfortable or in pain. Reward your efforts. Congratulate yourself on what you have achieved by doing something that makes you happy, such as going to lunch with a friend, watching a movie or reading a new book.
r/TwoSentenceHorror 12 hr. ago CalebVanPoneisen ‎ ‎ ‎ ‎ ‎ ‎ ‎ ‎ ↓ˢᶜʳᵒˡˡ ᶠᵒʳ ˢᵗᵒʳʸ↓ Stinging paın jolts me awake, but my broken bødy reminds me that I did survive the plane crash. Dozens of exotic snails are grazing my motionless bødy, slowly tearing into my flesh, while I can do nothing but silently witness my torment..
r/shortscarystories 13 hr. ago S_G_Woodhouse I think I'm losing my head I was driving home after a long day at work. I blinked, and the next thing I knew, I was at home having dinner with my wife and 2 daughters. "What's wrong honey" she asked me. "I don't know. I just feel like I've forgotten something" I replied, confused. Forgot something? It was much worse than that, I had no memory of going home. I reassured her and spent the rest of the evening as normal, re-watching one of my favorite movies. Eventually, I dozed off. I dreamt strange things. I saw myself, having a picnic with my parents. Except they weren't smiling and happy like I remembered them. Instead, they were sitting on the picnic blanket, staring into space, their faces closed and expressionless. No matter how much I shouted at them in my daze, I couldn't see any life left in them; it was as if they were there, without being there. Detached. I woke up in my bed, alone. I looked all over the house, but not only was my wife gone, so were my children. My cell phone line was dead, no service. I went outside to get my car and drive to work, thinking I'd try to call my wife a little later. There was no one on the road but me. It was as if the whole Earth had emptied out. I'd dismissed my detachment last night, but I was seriously beginning to wonder if I was losing my mind. I was lost. I decided to go to my work to see if anyone was still in town, if a national evacuation drill was underway and could explain everything. Once there, I rushed back into the building, hoping to find someone who could explain what was going on. And when I opened the door, I was relieved to see that all my colleagues were there. At last, I could find out what was going on. I walked over to a colleague who over the years had become my best friend. "Hey, what's going on? My family's disappeared and there's nobody left in town," I asked him. He didn't answer. I stepped forward to face him, and discovered to my horror that his face and expression were detached exactly the same as my parents' in my dream. It couldn't be, was I trapped in a nightmare? I tried to talk to everyone, but they were all in the same state. My head hurt, my eyes hurt. I saw lights, and sounds filled my ears even though there was nothing here. Nothing alive. My vision began to narrow. Sounds began to blend together. Blackness. Emptiness. And finally, words I didn't have time to understand came to me for the last time. "The driver is dead, his head was torn off by the impact."
Ask your doctor about numbing cream. Prescription topical creams that contain lidocaine and prilocaine (Emla, Relador, and generic) can cut vaccine pain in half, the University of Toronto's Taddio says, and both children and adults can use these. The creams take anywhere from 20 to 60 minutes to become fully effective, depending on the brand. Taddio suggests bringing cream to the doctor's office and asking the nurse when you first arrive to show you where the shot will be given, so you'll be sure to numb the right area in advance. December 10, 2017
White-tigress • 16d ago I recommend calling different doctors, letting them KNOW you have anxiety and you need an appointment with no physical exam. It’s ok to have an appointment like this and if you don’t feel comfortable with the doctor then try a different one. Go To the doctor you end up feeling the most comfortable with and explain your pain issues and get their feedback For a plan for pain management and assurance that if you say STOP at any time during the exam, it all Stops and you either get to Have a break and calm down or get to decide to walk away and not finish. I don’t know if this helps but you have the right to meet with more than one doctor and not have a physical exam and discuss your anxiety and need for pain management and boundaries and why like this.
Surgeon Robert Liston In 1847, a doctor performed an amputation in 25 seconds, operating so quickly that he accidentally amputated his assistant's fingers as well. Both later died of sepsis, and a spectator reportedly died of shock, resulting in the only known procedure with a 300% mortality rate.
I went to the plastic surgeon for a consultation . The doctor looked at me and said , " Don't do this . You're too beautiful just the way , you are . Don't change . " That doctor gmh . 2011.
Muscles relax during sleep, including those in the face. The nervous system relaxes when we go into a deep sleep, which can also cause our facial muscles to relax. This can lead to our mouths falling open and drool escaping from the sides of our mouths. Also saliva can spill out of your mouth as drool when your facial muscles relax in your sleep like if the mouth falls open. Since the muscles around your mouth are relaxed, your mouth can be relaxed enough that saliva slips out. Once in sleep cycle, your body’s muscles, including those in your face and mouth, start to relax, often resulting in less swallowing and more drool. But sometimes when you're asleep, your brain forgets to tell your throat and mouth muscles to swallow, causing saliva to commute from your mouth to your pillow. As you sleep, your body enters a state of relaxation and restoration. This means that your muscles relax – including all of the muscles and tissues in the airway. When these tissues relax, they may fall back into the airway, partially blocking your ability to breathe normally. Sometimes causes your throat to compress as your tongue falls further back into your airway and the open space behind your tongue and soft palate is reduced. Inhaled air becomes turbulent. Directly inhaled air vibrates the soft tissues at the back of your mouth Though breathing is an involuntary function and it may be difficult to control how your breathe while sleeping, if you sleep on your side, the saliva collects in the side of your mouth and the reflex does not kick in to get rid of the drool. However, if you sleep on your back, saliva collects in the back of the throat and leads to automatic swallowing action. If you breathe through partially blocked nose, greater suction forces are created that can cause your throat to collapse and bring on snoring where your uvula and soft palate start to flap. When we fall asleep, many muscles in our body relax. This is true of the muscles in our airway, since not fully conscious. When you doze off and progress from a light sleep to a deep sleep, the muscles in the roof of your mouth (soft palate), tongue and/or throat relax more. This usually happens when the muscles in your body (including your face) relax during sleep, especially during your REM cycle. When this happens, your jaw falls slack and your mouth falls open.
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