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Copy & Paste Gascore Emojis & Symbols 27 March 2023Nitrous oxide is a colourless gas com

27 March 2023 Nitrous oxide is a colourless gas commonly used as an analgesic - a painkiller - in medicine. The gas can make people relaxed, giggly, light-headed or dizzy. According to the ADA, a patient under nitrous oxide will still have the ability to hear their general dentist and respond to any questions. Although it is not going to put a patient to sleep, nitrous oxide will help relax the bødy and mind. After a few minutes of breathing in the laughing gas through a mask the bødy might feel tingly or heavy and the patient will feel light-headed. It can actually help ease any feelings of anxiety before the procedure. If given nitrous oxide, they will feel sleepy, relaxed and perhaps a bit forgetful. They will still be aware of their surroundings, not necessarily put a patient to sleep. The mild sedative simply helps a patient relax but not intentionally fall asleep per se. The nitrous oxide slows down your nervous system to make you feel less inhibited. You may feel light-headed, tingly, and can be turned off when time for the patient to become more alert and awake. You might feel slightly drowsy, limit your coordination and affect your ability to remember the procedure. Often referred to as conscious sedation because you are awake, though in a state of depressed alertness. You will feel relaxed and may even fall into a light sleep. It differs from general anesthesia, whence patients are completely asleep throughout the procedure and won't remember the treatment afterward, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP). Whether or not fully awake, laughing gas can temporarily feel euphoric and even giddy. Once the gas wears off all the effects are gone, and people are fully awake and back to their regular selves, if slightly groggy.
There are different types of sedatives that use to numb you, each serving a different purpose. IV Sedation IV means intravenous. It means the doctor ınjectıons the drvg straight into your bloodstream. Dentists often use IV because of it's excellent success rate. After ınjectıons, it puts the patient in a ‘twilight sleep’ state. IV sedation is the typical option. This is what can happen to a patient on IV: IV sedation dentistry produce either partial or full memory loss during the dental procedure. This means time will seem to pass very quickly and you will not recall much of what happened. The patient is awake and aware of the surroundings. They are also responsive. The patient feels comfortable and relaxed throughout the whole procedure. So relaxed, in fact, that they might not be aware they’re undergoing one. It causes temporary amnesia and a state of ‘h͞igh’. There’s a reason IV is a popular option in dental operations. It works, and it works like a dream (pun intended). But for it to be effective, the patient must fast before coming in. Coming in with a full stomach can render the drvg ineffective. Most people who receive IV sedation dentistry fall asleep and have little to no memory of their treatment when they wake up. Inhalation Sedation Inhalation Sedation: This introduces a state of relaxation. This is a conscious sedation method that is fast-acting and with few side effects. Contrary to popular belief, inhalation sedation gas doesn’t make you burst into a giggle fit. It is a light anesthetic unlike IV. It also doesn’t work as well, but it still gets the job done for a quicker and relatively painless experience. This is what happens if you’re sedated using laughing gas: The patient experiences a euphoric sensation much like that with IV. But the effects are not as pronounced as the former. Laughing gas may cause a bit of amnesia, but the patient will still be remembering most of the procedure. It can make a patient dizzy, but they can still be awakened. Those who might have concerns about laughing gas can rest easy. It’s mild in comparison to IV, so you won’t be laughing out of control like anytime soon. Different sedation options offer varying levels of effects. Say, if you know you’re going for IV, ask somebody to accompany you. IV is potent enough to render you unable to go home on your own. General anesthesia is a type of unconscious sedation. In other words, you’ll be completely unconscious during the procedure. You’ll be asleep when you’re under sedation and not feel any paın during your treatment. It’s like taking a nap! Some sedation makes you quite groggy, and you may even fall asleep. But you’ll still be able to communicate with your dentist if necessary, and you’ll awaken with a gentle nudge. Because sedation temporarily affects your memory and motor skills, you’ll need a friend or family member to drive you home after your procedure.

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These levels of sedation under anesthesia are defined by the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) and are crucial in determining the appropriate level of sedation for each patient and procedure, ensuring patient safety and comfort throughout the perioperative period. Minimal Sedation: Also known as anxiolysis, minimal sedation involves a drug-induced state during which patients respond normally to verbal commands. Their cognitive function and physical coordination remain unaffected, and there is no compromise in airway reflexes or protective reflexes. This level of sedation is commonly used for procedures requiring minimal discomfort or anxiety relief, such as minor dental procedures or diagnostic tests. Moderate Sedation/Conscious Sedation: Moderate sedation, also referred to as conscious sedation, induces a drug-induced depression of consciousness, during which patients respond purposefully to verbal or light tactile stimulation. While maintaining spontaneous ventilation, patients may experience decreased anxiety and may have impaired cognitive function and physical coordination. However, they retain the ability to maintain their own airway and respond to commands. This level of sedation is commonly used for procedures such as endoscopic examinations, minor surgeries, or interventional radiology procedures. Deep Sedation: Deep sedation involves a drug-induced depression of consciousness, during which patients may not respond purposefully to verbal or tactile stimulation. Patients under deep sedation may require assistance in maintaining their airway, and spontaneous ventilation may be inadequate. However, patients still maintain cardiovascular function. This level of sedation is often used for procedures requiring significant analgesia and amnesia, such as major surgical procedures or certain diagnostic imaging studies. General Anesthesia: General anesthesia involves a drug-induced state during which patients are unarousable, even in the presence of painful stimulation. Patients under general anesthesia require assistance in maintaining their airway and ventilation, and cardiovascular function may be impaired. General anesthesia is characterized by a complete loss of consciousness and protective reflexes, allowing for surgical procedures to be performed without pain or awareness. This level of sedation is utilized for major surgical procedures or invasive diagnostic procedures where unconsciousness and muscle relaxation are necessary. Procedural sedation and analgesia (PSA) is a technique in which a sedating/dissociative medication is given, usually along with an analgesic medication, in order to perform non-surgical procedures on a patient. The overall goal is to induce a decreased level of consciousness while maintaining the patient's ability to breathe on their own. Airway protective reflexes are not compromised by this process
Sedation: Who Provides Anesthesia? Several types of medical professionals are able to provide anesthesia, including: Physicians (anesthesiologists) Nurse anesthetists Dentists/oral surgeons Anesthesiologist assistants The level of training varies between different types of providers, with anesthesiologists having the highest level. If you are receiving nitrous oxide (laughing gas), you will be fitted with a small mask inhale the anesthesia. If intravenous (IV) sedation is used, a needle is placed in the vein to administer the sedative. Regional Anesthesia Regional anesthesia is provided by injecting specific sites with a numbing medication. This may be done with a needle or via a flexible catheter line through which anesthetics and other medications can be administered as needed. With this type of anesthesia, only the body part being operated on is numbed, which means you are awake—that is, sedated, but still conscious—during the procedure. The anesthetic works on the nerves, causing numbness below the injection site. You are monitored throughout your procedure. Your anesthesia provider will continuously monitor your vital signs, including heart rate, blood pressure, and breathing, during your procedure. Local Anesthesia This type of anesthesia is typically used to numb a small site for minor procedures ,a numbing medication is either applied to the skin as a cream or spray, or injected into the area where the procedure will be performed. Monitored Anesthesia Care (MAC) This is a type of sedation commonly referred to as "twilight sleep." It's usually used for outpatient procedures to make you feel sleepy and relaxed. While you may be heavily sedated, this type of anesthesia is different from general anesthesia because you are not chemically paralyzed, nor do you require assistance with breathing. Still, your vital signs are closely monitored to make sure you're stable throughout the procedure. This type of anesthesia wears off in as little as 10 minutes. Depending on the medications used and the doses given, you may or may not remember the procedure. When the surgery is done, other medications can be used to reverse the effect of the anesthesia. You will also be monitored in this recovery phase. After the procedure is complete, the nitrous oxide gas or IV drip is stopped, and you'll be brought slowly out of sedation. They control the level in your body by increasing, decreasing, or eventually stopping the infusion, which wakes you up.
Specific Types and Classes Multiple types are available. Some allow you to be alert and oriented during a medical procedure, while others make sleep so you're unaware of what's going on. It essentially puts you into a medically induced coma. This type of anesthesia not only allows a person to undergo a procedure without pain but also allows the person to be unconscious for the procedure. Some specific types or classes of general anesthesia include: IV anesthetics sedatives- your anesthesiologist will use your IV line to administer into your blood. The medication works quickly and typically puts you to sleep in under a minute. For this reason, its effects can be stopped by stopping the infusion, which will wake you up from it in minutes. Inhalational anesthetics The four clinical stages of general anesthesia include induction, maintenance, emergence, and recovery. Induction can be achieved through administration of either an intravenous or inhalation anesthetic. During the maintenance stage, anesthetic agents, intravenous, inhalation, or a combination, are continued to maintain the surgical stage of anesthesia. The emergence phase correlates to the discontinuation of anesthetic agents with the goal attaining near baseline functionality. Organ systems of focus include the cardiovascular, respiratory, and central nervous systems (CNS). Throughout the procedure, the anesthesiologist will monitor your vital signs, including your heart rate and rhythm, blood pressure, temperature, and body fluid balance, to ensure safety and comfort. The recovery phase is an extension of the emergence stage whereby the goal is to return the patient back to their baseline state of physiological function. While most people will start to regain consciousness within a few minutes, it can take several hours to feel completely alert and coherent again. Patients experiencing delirium or agitation when coming out of anesthesia can also feel hyperactive or experience extreme sluggishness. The researchers believe hyperactivity may result from the microglia intervening too much between the neuron and inhibitory synapses.
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These may include nitrous oxide (laughing gas) inhaled, an intravenous (IV) line in, oral medications like Valium or Halcion (for anxiety) or a combination, along with anesthesia to numb the pain. Regardless of which type of anesthesia you’re given, you should feel relaxed and pain-free, with limited to no memory of the procedure. If you’re given general anesthesia, you’ll lose consciousness altogether. A surgical team will closely monitor your pulse, respiration, blood pressure, and fluids.
local anesthesia (you're awake and may feel pressure but shouldn't feel pain), sedation (you're awake but with lessened consciousness and won't remember much) or general anesthesia (you're completely knocked out and won't remember jack)
Three broad categories of anesthesia exist: General anesthesia suppresses central nervous system activity and results in unconsciousness and total lack of sensation, using either injected or inhaled dr*gs. General anesthesia (as opposed to sedation or regional anesthesia) has three main goals: lack of movement (paralƴsıs), unconsciousness, and blunting of the stress response. Sedation suppresses the central nervous system to a lesser degree, inhibiting both anxıety and creation of long-term memories without resulting in unconsciousness. Sedation (also referred to as dissociative anesthesia or twilight anesthesia) creates hypnotic, sedative, anxiolytic, amnesic, anticonvulsant, and centrally produced muscle-relaxing properties. From the perspective of the person giving the sedation, the patıents appear sleepy, relaxed and forgetful, allowing unpleasant procedures to be more easily completed. From the perspective of the subject receiving a sedative, the effect is a feeling of general relaxation, amnesia (loss of memory) and time pass1ng quickly. Regional and local anesthesia block transmission of nerve impulses from a specific part of the bødy. Depending on the situation, this may be used either on it's own (in which case the individual remains fully conscious), or in combination with general anesthesia or sedation. When paın is blocked from a part of the bødy using local anesthetics, it is generally referred to as regional anesthesia. There are many types of regional anesthesia either by ınjectıons into the tissue itself, a vein that feeds the area or around a nerve trunk that supplies sensation to the area. The latter are called nerve blocks and are divided into peripheral or central nerve blocks. Local anesthesia is simple infiltration by the clinician directly onto the region of interest (e.g. numbing a tooth for dental work). Peripheral nerve blocks use dr*gs targeted at peripheral nerves to anesthetize an isolated part of the bødy, such as an entire limb. Neuraxial blockade, mainly epidural and spinal anesthesia, can be performed in the region of the central nervous system itself, suppressing all incoming sensation from nerves supplying the area of the block. Most general anaesthetics are ınduced either intravenously or by inhalation. Anaesthetic agents may be administered by various routes, including inhalation, ınjectıons (intravenously, intramuscular, or subcutaneous) Agent concentration measurement: anaesthetic machines typically have monitors to measure the percentage of inhalational anaesthetic agents used as well as exhalation concentrations. In order to prolong unconsciousness for the duration of surgery, anaesthesia must be maintained. Electroencephalography, entropy monitoring, or other systems may be used to verify the depth of anaesthesia. At the end of surgery, administration of anaesthetic agents is discontinued. Recovery of consciousness occurs when the concentration of anaesthetic in the braın drops below a certain level (this occurs usually within 1 to 30 minutes, mostly depending on the duration of surgery) The duration of action of intravenous induction agents is generally 5 to 10 minutes, after which spontaneous recovery of consciousness will occur. Emergence is the return to baseline physiologic function of all organ systems after the cessation of general anaesthetics. This stage may be accompanied by temporary neurologic phenomena, such as agitated emergence (acute mental confusion), aphasia (impaired production or comprehension of speech), or focal impairment in sensory or motor function.
There are a few reasons for drooling in your sleep, including side sleeping and mouth breathing during sleep. Additionally, the swallow reflex occurs much less during sleep than during waking hours, which can lead to a buildup of saliva. That saliva can spill out of your mouth as drool when your facial muscles relax in your sleep and your mouth falls open. Mouth breathing during sleep may make drooling more likely, since drool can more easily escape when your mouth is open. While you sleep, your muscles typically relax. Since the muscles around your mouth are relaxed your mouth can be relaxed enough that saliva slips out. The position you sleep in could make you more prone to excessive drooling. As your body produces saliva, the liquid is more likely to escape from the front or the side of your mouth when it’s facing downward due to mere gravity. Sleeping with your mouth open increases the amount of air that passes through your mouth. This increased air facilitates movement and can lead to an overflow of saliva out of your mouth. Because drool is your saliva escaping your mouth unintentionally, it's more likely to happen when you're not consciously able to control it, like when you're sleeping. Due to this muscle relaxation during sleep, there is no conscious effort in managing saliva and controlling the mouth. Factors such as sleep position, tongue placement, and overall muscle tone play a role.
The different types of anesthesia are broadly described as: Local anesthesia (agents, either topical or injectable, given to temporarily block paın in a specific part of the bødy) in which the medication only removes sensation from one part of your bødy, but you are not unconscious. Regional anesthesia (injected agents, to numb a portion of the bødy) General anesthesia (an agent, given either by mask or an IV line, to induce unconsciousness) General anesthesia is highly effective in keeping you unaware of your surgical procedure. Monitored anesthesia care (also known as "twilight sleep") It can be given intravenously (IV, by injection into the vein). The medication works quickly and typically puts you to sleep in under a minute. Medicines administered via the bloodstream begin to take effect quickly, often within minutes. Most people feel very relaxed at the start of IV sedation as the medicines begin to take effect. Many people remember the feeling of relaxation and waking up after the procedure is over but nothing in between. There are different levels of IV sedation, and you may or may not be awake during the procedure. Your anesthesia team will adjust your sedation level throughout the procedure. One other type of anesthesia apart from general is called MAC (monitored anesthesia care), where you are kept sleepy and given paın medication but still breathe independently. Anesthesia can provide sedation ranging from slight (relaxed and mildly sleepy) to deep sleep.
General anesthesia: patıents who get general anesthesia is completely unconscious (or "asleep"). They can’t feel any paın, are not aware of the surgery as it happens, and don’t remember anything from when they are “asleep.” Patients can get general anesthesia through an IV (into a vein) or inhale it through their nose and mouth. With general anesthesia, you're typically given a combination of medications through a mask or intravenous (IV) needle. This will render you temporarily unconscious. The combination of medications used to put patients to “sleep” before surgery or another medical procedure is called general anesthesia. Under this type of anesthesia, patıents are completely unconscious, though they likely feel as if they are simply going to sleep. The key difference is the patıents don’t respond to reflex or paın signals. Regional anesthesia: This type of anesthesia may be injected near a cluster of nerves in the spine. This makes a large area of the bødy numb and unable to feel paın. Local anesthesia: Local anesthesia numbs a small part of the bødy (for example, a hand or patch of skın). It can be given as a shot, spray, or ointment. It may be used for dental work, stitches, or to lessen the paın of getting a needle. General and regional anesthesia are used in hospitals and surgery centers. These medicines are given to patients by specially trained doctors (anesthesiologists) or nurses (nurse anesthetists). Health care providers can give patients local anesthesia in doctors’ offices and clinics. Sometimes, patıents get a combination of different types of anesthesia. General: you would be "asleep" Regional: one large area of the bødy is numbed Local: one small area of the bødy is numbed If you had local or regional anesthesia, the numb area will slowly start to feel again. You then may feel some discomfort in the area. Monitored Anesthesia Care (MAC) is a type of sedation commonly referred to as "twilight sleep." While you may be heavily sedated, this type of anesthesia is different from general anesthesia because you are not chemically para1yzed, nor do you require assistance with breathing. Still, your vital signs are closely monitored to make sure you're stable throughout the procedure. This type of anesthesia wears off in as little as 10 minutes. Depending on the medications used and the doses given, you may or may not remember the procedure. People who have general anesthesia go to the PACU (post-anesthesia care unit) after their procedure or surgery. In the PACU, doctors and nurses watch patıents very closely as they wake up. Some people feel irritable, or confused when waking up. They may have a dry throat from breathing tubes. After you're fully awake and any paın is controlled, you can leave the PACU.
The central symptom of sleep talking is audible expression that occurs during sleep without the person being aware of it happening. It can be gibberish or resemble normal speech and consists in the unaware production of vocalisation during sleep. However, people are very rarely aware that they are talking in their sleep at the time and typically have no recollection of the episodes when they wake up. A large number of sleep speeches merely consist of short expressions of assent or negation (e.g., ‘OK’, ‘no,’ ‘good,’ ‘mm-hm,’ ‘uh-huh,’ ‘no!’ ‘stop!’ ‘don’t!’, etc.) As they experience different sensations and emotions in their dreams, it may manifest as groaning or other vocalisations. Excess mucus, combined with nose breathing and narrow airways, can lead to rattling or whistling sounds. Congestion and dry or swollen nasal membranes can clog up the works making breathing audible instead of peaceful. Sometimes it’s occasional, a gentle, perhaps even peaceful, soft whistling. Other times it sounds like a buzz saw, getting closer and closer, paused by a moment of silence, before climaxing in an even louder snort or gasp for air. And sometimes when we fall into a deep sleep, the muscles in the roof of the mouth (soft palate), tongue and throat relax. The tissues in the back of the throat can relax enough that they partially block the airway. As we inhale and exhale, these tissues rattle and vibrate, resulting in sounds in some people. The tissue vibration increases as the airway narrows, causing the snoring to grow louder and louder. As a person inhales and exhales, the moving air causes the tissue to flutter and make noise. Usually during sleep the brain becomes used to one’s own snoring (a process called habituation) As mentioned, people sometimes don’t hear themselves snore because the brain’s ability to receive sensory information is limited while we sleep. Some external stimulus may cause a person to stir, however.
6 NOV 2013 ANESTHESIA If you’re having general anesthesia, an anesthesiologist will give you medications that make you lose consciousness. After the surgery is complete, you won’t be wide awake right away. General anesthesia brings on a sleep-like state with the use of a combination of medicines. The medicines, known as anesthetics, are given before and during surgery or other medical procedures. General anesthesia usually uses a combination of intravenous medicines and inhaled gasses. You'll feel as though you're asleep. But general anesthesia does more than put you to sleep. You don't feel pain when you're under general anesthesia. This is because your brain doesn't respond to pain signals or reflexes. While you're under anesthesia, the anesthesia team monitors you, watches your body's vital functions, manages your breathing and treats pain related to the procedure. Your surgery might not require general anesthesia, but you might need sedation to be comfortable during the procedure. The effects of sedation, also called twilight sedation and monitored anesthesia care, can include being sleepy but awake and able to talk, or being asleep and unaware of your surroundings. The recovery from sedation is similar to that of general anesthesia but patients usually wake up quicker and their recovery time is shorter. As with general anesthesia, you won’t be able to drive and should probably have someone stay with you for at least the first several hours after you return home. You'll slowly wake either in the operating room or the recovery room. You'll probably feel groggy and a little confused when you first awaken. You may continue to be sleepy, and your judgment and reflexes may take time to return to normal.
September 14, 2023 Laughing gas is an anesthetic used by medical professionals to help you remain calm before a procedure. It’s not meant to put you fully to sleep. As laughing gas doesn’t put you fully to sleep, you’ll still be able to hear what’s going on around you. You may still be able to respond to questions that your doctor asks you and follow the instructions that they give you throughout the procedure. Nitrous oxide is a depressant, so it slows your bødy down. Once it kicks in, you may feel: Happy Giggly Light-headed Mild euphoria Relaxed Nitrous oxide gets the name “laughing gas” because of these effects. Some people may also experience mild hallucinations (can experience false perceptions in an altered dream-like state of consciousness) whilst under the use of laughing gas. At the lowest doses, you’ll only feel lightheaded, but as the dose goes up you’ll feel sleepy and experience paın relief. While this type of gas will not put you to sleep, it can make you drowsy as the gas dulls the paın receptors in your brain.
08 January 2006 Laughing gas is nitrous oxide, and it acts as an anaesthetic-type agent. It makes your braın feel a bit woozy in the same way that alcohol does. As a result, if you take some laughing gas, you fell a little bit drınk and a little bit cheerful. If you have enough of it, you start to feel a little bit sleepy, but it's very good at paın kılling. If you're having an operation, it's sometimes used with other anaesthetics to ķíľľ paın and make you more comfortable. It is different from anesthesia, where you essentially go to sleep for a procedure. Although people can sometimes feel sleepy while taking nitrous oxide, they will still be able to respond but with decreased alertness temporarily. Sometimes one might start feeling sleepy or groggy as if you really want to fall asleep; you may be pretty out of it when you come to consciousness.
June 11, 2014 • Anesthesia induces a deep state of unconsciousness in a matter of seconds, but it can take several hours to return to normal after waking. Many people experience confusion, sleepiness, and even delirium. Consciousness is the awareness of subjective states such as emotion, inner thoughts, ideas, intentions, and mental states. Without consciousness, an organism has no awareness, while consciousness is often explained as the awareness of emotion, the ability to think and to remember past events and anticipate current ones. General anesthesia affects your entire body. Other types of anesthesia affect specific regions. Most people are awake during operations with local or regional anesthesia. General anesthesia dampens stimulation, knocks you unconscious and keeps you from moving during the operation. General anesthesia has 3 main stages: going under (induction), staying under (maintenance) and recovery (emergence). A specially trained anesthesiologist or nurse anesthetist gives you the proper doses and continuously monitors your vital signs—such as heart rate, body temperature, blood pressure and breathing. The first is an inability to remember things, but can’t recall them after waking up. Next, patients lose the ability to respond. Finally they go into deep sedation. General anesthesia looks more like a coma—a reversible coma. You lose awareness and the ability to feel pain, form memories and move. Once you’ve become unconscious, the anesthesiologist uses monitors and medications to keep you that way. Lack of Consciousness. Keeps you from being aware of your surroundings. Analgesia. Blocks your ability to feel pain. Amnesia. Prevents formation of memories. Loss of Movement. Relaxes your muscles and keeps you still during surgery. Stable Body Functions.
3 NOV 2015 General anesthetics and sedatives work by anesthetizing the brain and central nervous system. You may start feeling lightheaded, before becoming unconscious within a minute or so. Once surgery is done and anesthesia medications are stopped, you’ll slowly wake up in the operating room or recovery room. You’ll probably feel groggy and a bit confused. Because of the amnestic effect, you probably will not remember feeling somnolent. When first waking from anesthesia, you may feel confused, drowsy, and foggy. Some people may become confused, disoriented, dizzy or trouble remembering things after surgery. General anesthesia is essentially a medically induced coma. Your doctor administers medication to make you unconsciousness so that you won’t move or feel any pain during the operation.
Feb 21, 2014 03:55 PM Anesthesia has been referred to as a reversible coma. When coming out of anesthesia in recovery, most people experience a profound sense of confusion and disorientation. It takes a while for the brain to actually wake up, even after you are conscious. Most people don't remember much after the pre-op sedative has been given. You may need a type of anesthesia where you lose consciousness. You can experience confusion as you “wake up” after the procedure with this type of anesthesia. It holds several different purposes depending on the procedure — sometimes to relieve pain, to “knock” you unconscious or to induce amnesia so you have no memory or feeling of a medical procedure. General anesthesia knocks you out completely, while local anesthesia is only applied to certain body parts or patches of skin. General anesthesia involves going into a coma-like state. It’s like being asleep. You will not be aware of what’s happening around you or feel pain. You will receive this type through an IV or mask. The surgeon will monitor you throughout the procedure and adjust medications as needed so you don’t wake up. It’s likely you’ll have no memory of the procedure. The anesthesia used to put you into an unconscious state can take some time to wear off, even as you become more awake after the procedure. You may experience: drowsiness confusion weakness uncoordinated movements lack of control of what you say blurry vision memory problems These side effects should be temporary. It may take 1 to 2 days to fully regain all your thinking abilities. In some cases, you can experience postoperative delirium. This can cause you to feel “out of it” for a longer period of time. Conscious sedation and general anesthesia can affect your short-term memory. You may not remember anything you say or do during the procedure or immediately after it.
4 min read As you doze off, your face muscles gradually relax, giving your mouth free rein to drop open. Snoring is noisy breathing while you sleep. Air flows past relaxed tissues in your throat causing the tissues to vibrate as you breathe. Snoring can be caused by a number of factors such as the anatomy of your mouth and/or sinuses. When you doze off and progress from a light sleep to a deeper sleep, the muscles in the roof of your mouth (soft palate), tongue and throat relax. The more narrowed your airway, the more forceful the airflow becomes. As a person inhales and exhales, the moving air causes the tissue to flutter and make noise. Narrowing or partial blockage of the airways can make these relaxed tissues flutter. Air passing through these vibrations causes the rumbling sounds of snoring. In other words, the muscles that support the airway relax, allowing the breathing tube to constrict. When the airway gets narrower, the velocity of the air moving through it increases. The air vibrates more and creates more sound. When you mouth-breathe, your tongue is lower than usual to allow for extra air. Snoring can be both chronic, meaning it happens every time you drift off, or it may just occur from time to time, depending on different factors. Sometimes, poor oral and facial muscle control are the common factors. Also saliva is more likely to drip out with the mouth open during sleep. Mouth breathing can lead to saliva running out of the mouth as it unintentionally escapes after saliva pooling in the mouth. Yet air flow through the throat the soft tissues vibrate and cause snoring. The narrower the airway becomes, the more the air is forced and the louder the noise. Sleeping with your mouth open increases the amount of air that passes through your mouth. Facial muscles relax in your sleep and your mouth falls open. Saliva is more likely to leave the mouth when a person keeps their mouth open during sleep. It can spill out of your mouth as drool when your facial muscles relax. Since the muscles around your mouth are relaxed, your mouth can be relaxed enough that saliva slips out side. It's unintentionally, it’s more likely to happen when you’re not consciously able to control it when you’re sleeping. But when you’re sleeping you’re relaxed and so are your facial muscles.
NREM Stage N1 This stage of non-REM sleep is the typical transition from wakefulness to sleep and generally lasts only a few minutes. Stage N1 is the lightest stage of sleep; patients awakened from it usually don’t perceive that they were actually asleep During this stage: Eye movements are typically slow and rolling. heartbeat and breathing slow down muscles begin to relax you produce low amplitude mixed frequencies waves in the theta range (4 to 7 Hz) NREM Stage N2 This next stage of non-REM sleep comprises the largest percentage of total sleep time and is considered a lighter stage of sleep from which you can be awakened easily. This is the stage before you enter deep sleep. During this stage: heartbeat and breathing slow down further no eye movements body temperature drops Sleep spindles and K-complexes are two distinct brain wave features that appear for the first time NREM Stage N3 This final stage of non-REM sleep is the deepest sleep stage. Stage N3 sleep is known as slow-wave, or delta, sleep. Your body performs a variety of important health-promoting tasks in this final non-REM stage. During this stage: arousal from sleep is difficult heartbeat and breathing are at their slowest rate no eye movements body is fully relaxed delta brain waves are present tissue repair and growth, and cell regeneration occurs immune system strengthens REM Stage R There are two phases of REM sleep: phasic and tonic. Phasic REM sleep contains bursts of rapid eye movements, while tonic REM sleep does not. Stage R occurs about 90 minutes after you fall asleep, and is the primary “dreaming” stage of sleep. Stage R sleep lasts roughly 10 minutes the first time, increasing with each REM cycle. The final cycle of stage R may last roughly between 30 to 60 minutes. During this stage: eye movements become rapid during phasic REM breathing and heart rate increases and become more variable muscles become paralyzed, but twitches may occur brain activity is markedly increased When you fall asleep at night, you cycle through all of these stages of sleep multiple times — roughly every 90 minutes or so.
Why do people sleep talk? Posted May 24, 2009 Why do people sleep talk? In order to better understand parasomnias, it is important to understand what happens while we sleep. We start out awake when we lie down, close our eyes, and fall asleep, entering into light sleep, which then quickly gives way to deeper sleep. This is referred to as a sleep cycle, and generally lasts between 90-120 minutes. Sleep cycles again several more times during the night, though as the night progresses. The different stages of sleep are characterized by distinct brain wave patterns, as well as by differences in other physiologic parameters, such as muscle tone, eye movement, heart rate, breathing rate and patterns, and blood pressure. In REM sleep, dreams are most vivid and memorable. As one transitions between the different stages of sleep, there can be brief awakenings, either partial or full, following which most people immediately return to sleep. Sometimes, however, there are strong pulls both to wakefulness and to deep sleep, and the result is that part of the brain continues to be in slow wave sleep, while another part is simultaneously in a state of wakefulness. The behavioral consequence is one of the NREM parasomnias: sleep walking, sleep talking, sleep eating, confusional arousals, night terrors. The person going through one of these is not aware of what she or he is doing and is often incoherent while it is happening, and has no recollection of it after. Dennis Rosen, M.D.
December 8, 2010 / Sleep Snoring is caused by breathing in air through a partially blocked airway. As you fall asleep, the muscles that keep your breathing passage open begin to relax while your throat contracts. The vibrating tissue produces the sound familiarly known as snoring. And whether a given person awakens to their own snores may also vary from night to night. A reflex in the upper airway prevents this collapse and keeps windpipes open when you’re awake. But when you’re asleep, that reflex isn’t as strong. The upper airway tends to partially collapse, and breathing becomes noisier. Snoring can be an occasional occurrence or something that happens on a regular basis. As the air forces through, causes soft tissues in mouth, nose and throat to bump into one other and vibrate. During sleep, the airways tend to narrow, which may cause increased airflow resistance. Tightening causing include increased exposure to allergens; cooling of the airways; being in a reclining position; and hormone secretions that follow a circadian pattern. Sleep itself may even cause changes in bronchial function. The vibration of relaxed throat tissues during sleep causes snoring. During sleep, the muscles loosen, narrowing the airway. As a person inhales and/or exhales, the moving air causes tissue to flutter thus make noise. Some people are more prone to snoring because of the size and shape of the muscles and tissues in their neck. In other cases, excess relaxing of the tissue or narrowing of the airway can lead to snoring.
https://www.verywellhealth.com/why-we-drool-in-our-sleep-3015103
Snoring can be caused by a number of factors, such as the anatomy of your møuth and sinuses, allergies, a cold, and your weıght. When you doze off and progress from a light sleep to a deeper sleep, the muscles in the roof of your møuth (soft palate), tongue and thr*at relax. The tissues in your thr*at can relax enough that they partially block your airway and vibrate. The more narrowed your airway, the more forceful the airflow becomes. This increases tissue vibration, which causes your snoring to grow louder.
How are sleep and anaesthesia the same? How do they differ? Sleep is natural. When you have met the need for it, it will finish by itself. Anaesthesia is caused by dr*gs. It will only finish when the dr*gs wear off. These dr*gs work by acting on the same parts of the brain that control sleep. While you are under anaesthesia your vital signs are constantly monitored to make sure you are 'asleep' and not feeling any paın. However you are in a drug-induced unconsciousness,dream-like experiences. In some cases, the patient may experience some confusion or disorientation after waking up from it. A common patient response on emerging from is disorientation, unaware of time passed.
ᵀʰᵉ ˢˡᵉᵉᵖᵒᵛᵉʳ ⁽ᔆᵖᵒⁿᵍᵉᵇᵒᵇ ᶠᵃⁿᶠⁱᶜ⁾ by @ALYJACI ᵀʰᵉ ᴳᵃˡ ᴾᵃˡˢ ʷᵉʳᵉ ᵃˡˡ ʰᵃᵛⁱⁿᵍ ᶠᵘⁿ ᵗᵒⁿⁱᵍʰᵗ ᵒᵘᵗˢⁱᵈᵉ ᔆᵃⁿᵈʸ'ˢ ᵗʳᵉᵉᵈᵒᵐᵉ! ᵀʰᵉʸ ˢᵉᵗ ᵘᵖ ᵃ ˡᵃʳᵍᵉ ᵗᵉˡᵉᵛⁱˢⁱᵒⁿ ᵃⁿᵈ ʷᵃᵗᶜʰᵉᵈ! ᵀʰᵉʸ ᵃˡˢᵒ ᵗᵃˡᵏᵉᵈ ᵃᵇᵒᵘᵗ ᵗʰᵉⁱʳ ˡⁱᵛᵉˢ‧ "ᴹʸ ᵈᵃᵈ ᵗʰⁱⁿᵏˢ ᴵ'ᵐ ᵗᵒ ʸᵒᵘⁿᵍ ᵗᵒ ᵍᵒ ᵒᵘᵗ ᵒⁿ ᵃ ᵈᵃᵗᵉ! ᴵ ʳᵉᵃˡⁱˢᵉ ʰᵉ ʷᵃⁿᵗˢ ᵗᵒ ᵖʳᵒᵗᵉᶜᵗ ᵐᵉ‧‧‧" ᴾᵉᵃʳˡ ᶜᵒⁿᶠⁱᵈᵉᵈ‧ "ᴵ ˡⁱᵏᵉ ᵈᵒⁱⁿᵍ ˢᶜⁱᵉⁿᶜᵉ ᵉˣᵖᵉʳⁱᵐᵉⁿᵗˢ ʷⁱᵗʰ ˢᵖᵒⁿᵍᵉᵇᵒᵇ ᵇᵘᵗ ʰᵉ ᶜᵃⁿ ᵐᵃᵏᵉ ᵐᵉ ᵐᵒʳᵉ ⁿᵉʳᵛᵒᵘˢ ᵗʰᵃⁿ ᵃ ˡᵒⁿᵍ ᵗᵃⁱˡᵉᵈ ᶜᵃᵗ ⁱⁿ ᵃ ʳᵒᵒᵐ ᶠᵘˡˡ ᵒᶠ ʳᵒᶜᵏⁱⁿᵍ ᶜʰᵃⁱʳˢ!" ᔆᵃⁿᵈʸ'ˢ ᵃ ˢᶜⁱᵉⁿᵗⁱˢᵗ⸴ ᵃⁿᵈ ˢᵒᵐᵉᵗⁱᵐᵉˢ ʰᵃˢ ˢᵖᵒⁿᵍᵉᵇᵒᵇ ᵗᵃᵍ ᵃˡᵒⁿᵍ‧ "ʸᵒᵘ ˢʰᵒᵘˡᵈ ᵗʳʸ ᵈʳⁱᵛⁱⁿᵍ ʷⁱᵗʰ ʰⁱᵐ!" ᴹˢ‧ ᴾᵘᶠᶠ ʳᵉᵖˡⁱᵉᵈ‧ "ᴵ'ᵐ ˢᵘʳᵉ ᵈʳⁱᵛⁱⁿᵍ'ˢ ʳᵒᵘᵍʰ⸴ ᵇᵘᵗ ᵈᵒᵉˢ ˢᶜⁱᵉⁿᶜᵉ ʷⁱᵗʰ ˢᵖᵒⁿᵍᵉᵇᵒᵇ ʰᵒˡᵈ ᵃ ᶜᵃⁿᵈˡᵉ ᵗᵒ ᵐʸ ʰᵘˢᵇᵃⁿᵈ'ˢ ᵉⁿᵈᵉᵃᵛᵒᵘʳˢ? ᴵ'ᵐ ˢᵘʳᵖʳⁱˢᵉᵈ ᵗʰᵉ ᶜʰᵘᵐ ᴮᵘᶜᵏᵉᵗ ˢᵗⁱˡˡ ˢᵗᵃⁿᵈⁱⁿᵍ‧‧‧" ˢᵃʸˢ ᴷᵃʳᵉⁿ‧ "ᴹᵉⁿ!" ᵀʰᵉʸ ᵃˡˡ ˢᵃⁱᵈ ᵃᵗ ᵗʰᵉ ˢᵃᵐᵉ ᵗⁱᵐᵉ‧ "ᴵ ʲᵘˢᵗ ᵈᵒⁿ'ᵗ ᵘⁿᵈᵉʳˢᵗᵃⁿᵈ ᵇᵒʸˢ‧‧‧" ᑫᵘᵉˢᵗⁱᵒⁿᵉᵈ ᴾᵉᵃʳˡ ᵃˢ ᵗʰᵉʸ ᵍᵒᵗ ʳᵉᵃᵈʸ ᵗᵒ ᵍᵒ ˢˡᵉᵉᵖ‧ ᴷᵃʳᵉⁿ'ˢ ᵗʰᵉ ᵒⁿˡʸ ᵒⁿᵉ ᵒᶠ ᵗʰᵉ ᵍᵃˡ ᵖᵃˡˢ ᵗᵒ ᵇᵉ ᵐᵃʳʳⁱᵉᵈ ʸᵉᵗ ᵉᵛᵉⁿ ᵃˢ ᵃ ᶜᵒᵐᵖᵘᵗᵉʳ ᵉᵛᵉⁿ ˢʰᵉ ˢᵗⁱˡˡ ʰᵃᵈⁿ'ᵗ ᵃⁿ ⁱᵈᵉᵃ ᵒⁿ ᵗʰᵉ ᵗʰᵒᵘᵍʰᵗ ᵖʳᵒᶜᵉˢˢ‧ ᴹˢ‧ ᴾᵘᶠᶠ ᵗᵃᵘᵍʰᵗ ˢᵗᵘᵈᵉⁿᵗˢ ᵇᵘᵗ ˢʰᵉ ᵈᵒᵉˢ ʷᵉˡˡ⸴ ᶜᵒⁿˢⁱᵈᵉʳⁱⁿᵍ ᵗʰᵉ ᶜⁱʳᶜᵘᵐˢᵗᵃⁿᶜᵉˢ‧ ᴱᵛᵉⁿ ˢᵒ ᵗʰᵉ ⁿᵉˣᵗ ᵈᵃʸ ᵃˡˡ ᵃʷᵒᵏᵉ ᵃʳᵒᵘⁿᵈ ᵗʰᵉ ˢᵃᵐᵉ ᵗⁱᵐᵉ⸴ ᵉⁿᵍᵃᵍⁱⁿᵍ ⁱⁿ ᵃ ᵖⁱˡˡᵒʷ ᶠⁱᵍʰᵗ ⁱⁿ ᵗʰᵉ ᵉᵃʳˡʸ ᵈᵃʷⁿ ᵐᵒʳⁿⁱⁿᵍ⸴ ˡᵃᵘᵍʰⁱⁿᵍ ᵃⁿᵈ ʰᵃᵛⁱⁿᵍ ᶠᵘⁿ‧ ᴳᵃˡ ᴾᵃˡˢ! @ALYJACI
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Consciousness requires both wakefulness and awareness. Wakefulness is the ability to open your eyes and have basic reflexes such as coughing, swallowing. Awareness is associated with more complex thought processes and is more difficult to assess. General anaesthesia is medication that gives a deep sleep-like state. You are unconscious and feel nothing. A coma is a state of unconsciousness where a person is unresponsive and cannot be woken. Someone who is in a coma is unconscious and has minimal brain activity. They're alive but can't be woken up and show no signs of awareness. The person's eyes will be closed and they'll appear to be unresponsive to their environment. Over time, the person may start to gradually regain consciousness and become more aware. Some people feel they can remember events that happened around them while they were in a coma. People who do wake up from a coma usually come round gradually. They might be very agitated and confused to begin with. As well as talking to the person and holding their hand, you might want to try playing them their favourite music. A person who shows clear but minimal or inconsistent awareness is classified as being in a minimally conscious state. They may have periods where they can communicate or respond to commands, such as moving a finger when asked. Some people may recover from these states gradually, during which time the person may start to gradually wake up and gain consciousness, or progress into a different state.
Sedation Today, physicians have many ways to make sure their patıents are as comfortable as possible during surgery or procedures for diagnosing medical conditions. One common type of pain control is called sedation, which relaxes you and sometimes makes you fall asleep. Sedation, also known as monitored anesthesia care, conscious sedation, or twilight sedation, typically is used for minor surgeries or for shorter, less complex procedures, when an injection of local anesthetic isn’t sufficient but deeper general anesthesia isn’t necessary. Depending on the procedure, the level of sedation may range from minimal (you’ll feel drowsy but able to talk) to deep (you probably won’t remember the procedure). What are the levels of sedation? The level of sedation a patient experiences depends on several factors, including the type of procedure you’re having and how your body responds to anesthesia. Your age, medical condition, and health habits may also affect the type of anesthesia you’ll receive. Regardless of the level of sedation, it’s important that an anesthesiologist be involved in your anesthesia care. An anesthesiologist is a medical doctor who specializes in anesthesia, paın management, and critical care medicine. That can happen if you are sedated to a point where you are confused or fall asleep and snore. For some procedures, you may receive medication that makes you sleepy and keeps you from feeling pain. There are different levels of sedation — some patients are drowsy, but they are awake and can talk; others fall asleep and don’t remember the procedure. The main levels of sedation are: Minimal – Minimal sedation will help you relax, but you will likely be awake. You’ll understand questions your doctor is asking and be able to answer as well as follow directions. This level of sedation is typically used when your doctor needs you to be involved in the procedure. Moderate – You will feel drowsy and may even fall asleep during the procedure. You may or may not remember some of the procedure. Deep – You won’t actually be unconscious, but you’ll sleep through the procedure and probably will have little or no memory of it. How does general anesthesia work? Under general anesthesia, you will be unconscious and unaware of what is happening. General anesthesia keeps you unconscious during the entire procedure. General anesthesia causes you to lose consciousness. General anesthesia is medicine that is administered by an anesthesiologist, a medical doctor, through a mask or an IV placed in the vein. While the anesthesia is working, you will be unconscious, and many of your body’s functions will slow down or need help to work effectively. During surgery, the anesthesiologist will monitor your vital signs to make sure they are normal and steady while you remain unconscious and free of paın. Once your surgery is complete, your anesthesiologist will reverse the medication and be with you as you return to consciousness and wake up, continually monitoring your breathing, circulation, and oxygen levels. It may take a day or two for the anesthesia medication to completely leave your system, so you could be sleepy, and your reflexes and judgment can be affected by Postoperative delirium – Confusion when regaining consciousness after surgery.
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5 Min Read|At one stage or another, have woken up to the sensation of a wet pillow clinging ever so slightly to. Why does this happen? Why some sleep with mouths open? And, can it be prevented? What’s left of any extra saliva that fled your mouth while you were sleeping is drool. During the day we naturally swallow any saliva produced in our mouth while at night this process is meant to slow down. But for the unlucky, dribbling continues at a rapid pace throughout the night. In fact, there’s even a name for the condition of producing too much saliva: sialorrhea. Your sleep position can greatly impact how much you drool. If you sleep on your front or side, your mouth is likely to hang open, letting saliva drip freely. Whereas if you sleep on your back, the saliva will pool at the back of your throat and activate your swallowing reflex. Also you are unconscious when this happens to it’s tricky to know for sure if you tend to open your mouth during the night, but if you are a mouth breather, you are likely going to dribble, and you may find your pillow is wet regularly. In general, you will breathe through your mouth if your nose is failing to provide enough oxygen to your body, so your lungs opt for Plan B and use your mouth for air, which is when saliva takes chance at a quick escape. You may also open your mouth throughout the night due to stress and anxiety as it activates your sympathetic nervous system. If you can’t breathe easily through your nose, you’re likely to open your mouth for air.
Anesthesia/Sedation: The surgeon or anesthesiologist administers general anesthesia, making you “sleep” without recalling the procedure. Your vitals like bľood pressure and heart rate are monitored. You’ll be sleepy. Nitrous Oxide (Laughing Gas): Quick to take effect and wear off, this gas keeps you calm and comfortable but awake and responsive. Many sedatives also induce amnesia, so won’t remember the procedure. You can still respond during the procedure but likely won’t recall it, as you might not remember the visit. General Anesthesia: it puts you to sleep during the procedure. Your vitals are closely watched, and you’ll wake up after without any memory of the work. It renders unconscious with no memory of the procedure. Post-treatment, they may experience altered sensations.
AUGUST 21, 2016 Consciousness is a spectrum. It ranges from being fully awake to lightly sedated (calm but remembering most things) to deep sedation (seldom remembering anything) and finally general anaesthesia. The depth of anaesthesia can be tailored according to the nature of the procedure. This reduced state of consciousness is brought on and maintained by delivering drvgs to your body either with volatile gasses which you breathe in and/or through a drip into your veins. While you are under anaesthesia your vital signs are constantly monitored to make sure you are ‘asleep’ and not feeling any paın. There is continuous monitoring of the electrical activity in your heart, the amount of oxygen in your bľood, your pulse rate and bľood pressure. Sometimes a device is used to monitor your brain waves while ‘asleep’, giving the doctor more detailed information about your level of unconsciousness. You can experience confusion as you “wake up” after the procedure. The drvgs used to put you into an unconscious state can take some time to wear off, even as you become more awake after the procedure. After your surgery is completed the anaesthetist reduces the dose of medications keeping you ‘asleep’ so that you gradually wake up. It may take 1 to 2 days to fully regain all your thinking abilities. It produces a feeling of relaxation and even giddiness. Some people describe feeling a tingling sensation while inhaling nitrous oxide. At end of surgery, you will awake to a tap on your shoulder and a gentle voice saying something like: “Hi, can you open your eyes?”
owlet: i think it’s importaпt to acknowledge that there is a contingent of doctors who have been… uh… coasting ever since med school ended. here’s a quick crash c̀ourse in telling them apart competent doctor: recognises that your sympt0ms sound familiar but also realises that the illness is outside the scope of their expertise, so they give you a referral incompetent doctor: doesn’t recognise your sympt0ms, chalks it all up to a m3ntal health and/or weıght prxblem and refuses any follow-up care competent doctor: stays up to date on the latest research in their field, is interested in sharing newly-discovered ınformαtıon with you incompetent doctor: maintains the absolute minimum amount of knowledge to not have their licence revoked competent doctor: approaches their patients with good faith incompetent doctor: assumes all patients are deceptive and have ulterior motives competent doctor: recognises crying and other overt paın sympt0ms as unacceptable and tries to resolve your paın any way they’re able incompetent doctor: ignores paın and either refuses to attempt to treat yours or willingly worsens it during a treatment by ignoring your reactions competent doctor: realises they don’t have all the answers, isn’t intimidated by the thought that you attend other doctors incompetent doctor: views their patients as income-generators and feels personally insulted when you attempt to leave their practise competent doctor: recognises all their patients are people; will be transparent about your treatment and speak to you with advanced and specific terminology if you demonstrate that you úndèrständ incompetent doctor: views patients as a sub-class of people, justifies lying to patients as “for their own goo͠d” (via intp-fluffy-robot) Jan 08, 2022
General anesthesia: A patient who gets general anesthesia is completely unconscious (or "asleep"). They can’t feel any pain, are not aware of the surgery as it happens, and don’t remember anything from when they are “asleep.” General anesthesia involves using many medications to render you unconscious during a surgery. This makes you unaware of things that are happening. It is generally described as melting back into the bed and falling asleep. This means you will have no awareness of the procedure once the anesthesia takes effect, and you won't remember it after. Anesthetics activate memory-loss receptors in the brain, ensuring that patients don't remember. General anesthesia looks more like a coma—a reversible coma. You lose awareness and the ability to feel paın, form memories and move. Then they turn the anesthetics off and allow you to come to. You then begin to pass into a semi-conscious stage to become aware of what is going on. Typically, the period of time when you’re under general anesthesia is a blank. Many patients report that it is a surreal experience—and practically no one remembers anything between when the medication is administered and waking up in the recovery. For general anesthesia, someone may feel groggy and a little confused when waking up after surgery.
Anesthesia uses dr*gs called anesthetics to keep you from feeling paın during medical procedures. Local and regional anesthesia numbs a specific area of your bødy. General anesthesia makes you temporarily unconscious (fall asleep) so you can have more invasive surgeries. Sedation: Also called “twilight sleep,” sedation relaxes you to the point where you’ll nap but can wake up if needed to communicate. General anesthesia: This treatment makes you unconscious and insensitive to paın or other stimuli, and will put the patient to sleep during the procedure so that you are asleep during the surgery. This type of anesthesia puts you into a deep sleep and you won’t be aware of or feel anything during the surgery. Once the procedure is over, the anesthesia will wear off and you’ll gradually wake up. They will not feel any paın or discomfort during the procedure and will not remember anything afterwards. Most people experience some level of loopiness after because the surgery involves anesthesia, which can cause side effects like dizziness and confusion. Source https://webdmd.org/what-kind-of-anesthesia-is-used-for-wisdom-teeth-removal/
ᵀʰᵘⁿᵈᵉʳ ⁽ᔆᵖᵒⁿᵍᵉᵇᵒᵇ ᶠᵃⁿᶠⁱᶜ⁾ "ᵀʳᵘᵗʰ ᵒʳ ᵈᵃʳᵉ⸴ ˢᵖᵒⁿᵍᵉᵇᵒᵇ?" ᴾˡᵃⁿᵏᵗᵒⁿ'ˢ ᵃᵗ ᔆᵖᵒⁿᵍᵉᴮᵒᵇ'ˢ ʰᵒᵘˢᵉ‧ "ᴰᵃʳᵉ!" "ᴵ ᵈᵃʳᵉ ʸᵒᵘ ᵗᵒ ᵍⁱᵛᵉ ᵐᵉ ᵗʰᵉ ᵏʳᵃᵇᵇʸ ᵖᵃᵗᵗʸ‧‧‧" "ᴵ ᶜʰᵃⁿᵍᵉ ᵐʸ ᵐⁱⁿᵈ ᵗᵒ ᵗʳᵘᵗʰ‧‧‧" "ʸᵒᵘ ᵗᵉˡˡ ᵐᵉ ʷʰᵃᵗ ᵗʳᵘˡʸ ᵍᵒᵉˢ ⁱⁿᵗᵒ ᵃ ᵏʳᵃᵇᵇʸ ᵖᵃᵗᵗʸ‧‧‧" "ᴺⁱᶜᵉ ᵗʳʸ⸴ ᴾˡᵃⁿᵏᵗᵒⁿ! ᴵ ʳᵃᵗʰᵉʳ ˡᵒˢᵉ ᵗʰᵉ ᵍᵃᵐᵉ ᵗʰᵃⁿ ᵐʸ ʲᵒᵇ‧‧‧" "ᴵ'ˡˡ ˢᵉᵉ ᵐʸˢᵉˡᶠ ᵒᵘᵗ ᵗʰᵉⁿ‧" ᔆᵘᵈᵈᵉⁿˡʸ⸴ ˡⁱᵍʰᵗⁿⁱⁿᵍ ˢᵗʳᵘᶜᵏ ˢᵗᵃʳᵗˡⁱⁿᵍ ᵗʰᵉᵐ ᵇᵒᵗʰ‧ ᴾˡᵃⁿᵏᵗᵒⁿ ʲᵘᵐᵖᵉᵈ‧ "ᴴᵉʸ ⁱᵗ'ˢ ʲᵘˢᵗ ᵃ ʳᵃⁱⁿˢᵗᵒʳᵐ⸴ ᴾˡᵃⁿᵏᵗᵒⁿ‧‧‧" "ᔆᵖᵒⁿᵍᵉᵇᵒᵇ ᶜᵃⁿ ᴵ ˢᵗᵃʸ ᵘⁿᵗⁱˡ ᵗʰᵉ ʷᵉᵃᵗʰᵉʳ ᵖᵃˢˢᵉˢ?" "ʸᵉˢ ᵒᶠ ᶜᵒᵘʳˢᵉ!" ᴴᵉᵃʳⁱⁿᵍ ᵗʰᵘⁿᵈᵉʳᵒᵘˢ ᶠˡᵃˢʰᵉˢ ᵃᵍᵃⁱⁿ⸴ ᴾˡᵃⁿᵏᵗᵒⁿ ʷʰⁱᵐᵖᵉʳᵉᵈ‧ "ᴵᵗ'ˡˡ ᵖᵃˢˢ⸴ ⁿᵒ ⁿᵉᵉᵈ ᵗᵒ ᵇᵉ ᵃᶠʳᵃⁱᵈ‧ ᵂᵉ'ʳᵉ ᵗᵒᵍᵉᵗʰᵉʳ⸴ ᵃⁿᵈ ⁱᵗ'ˢ ⁿⁱᵍʰᵗ ᵗⁱᵐᵉ; ᵐᵃʸ ᵇᵉ ⁱᵗ'ˡˡ ᵇᵉ ᵍᵒⁿᵉ ᵇʸ ᵐᵒʳⁿⁱⁿᵍ‧‧‧" ᔆᵖᵒⁿᵍᵉᵇᵒᵇ ˢᵃⁱᵈ ˢᵉᵉⁱⁿᵍ ʰⁱᵐ ᶠʳⁱᵍʰᵗᵉⁿᵉᵈ‧ ᴴᵉ ᵍᵒᵗ ᵃ ᵇˡᵃⁿᵏᵉᵗ ᶠᵒʳ ʰⁱᵐ ᵃⁿᵈ ᴾˡᵃⁿᵏᵗᵒⁿ ᵗᵒ ˢʰᵃʳᵉ ᵒⁿ ᵗʰᵉ ᶜᵒᵘᶜʰ‧ ᴮᵘᵗ ʸᵉᵗ ᴾˡᵃⁿᵏᵗᵒⁿ ᶜᵒᵘˡᵈⁿ'ᵗ ˢˡᵉᵉᵖ‧ ᴱᵛᵉⁿ ᵃˢ ʰᵉ ᵗʳⁱᵉᵈ⸴ ᵗʰᵉ ⁱⁿᶜˡᵉᵐᵉⁿᵗ ʷᵉᵃᵗʰᵉʳ ᵏᵉᵖᵗ ˢᵗᵃʳᵗˡⁱⁿᵍ ʰⁱᵐ ᵃˡˡ ⁿⁱᵍʰᵗ‧ ᴴᵉ ʰᵘᵈᵈˡᵉᵈ ᶜˡᵒˢᵉʳ ᵗᵒ ˢᵖᵒⁿᵍᵉᵇᵒᵇ⸴ ʷʰᵒ'ˢ ᔆˡᵉᵉᵖⁱⁿᵍ ᵗʰʳᵒᵘᵍʰᵒᵘᵗ ᵗʰᵉ ⁿⁱᵍʰᵗ‧ ᴾˡᵃⁿᵏᵗᵒⁿ ᵈⁱᵈⁿ'ᵗ ʷᵃⁿⁿᵃ ʷᵃᵏᵉ ˢᵖᵒⁿᵍᵉᵇᵒᵇ ᵗᵒ ᵃᵈᵐⁱᵗ ʰᵉ'ˢ ˢᶜᵃʳᵉᵈ‧ ᴱᵛᵉⁿ ᵗʰᵉ ⁿᵉˣᵗ ᵈᵃʸ ʷʰᵉⁿ ᵗʰᵉ ᵗʰᵘⁿᵈᵉʳⁱⁿᵍ ˢᵗᵒᵖᵖᵉᵈ⸴ ᵗʰᵉ ʳᵃⁱⁿ ᵈⁱᵈ ⁿᵒᵗ‧ "ʸᵒᵘ ˡᵒᵒᵏ ᵉˣʰᵃᵘˢᵗᵉᵈ‧‧‧" "ᴵ'ᵈ ⁿᵒ ˢˡᵉᵉᵖ ᵃᵗ ᵃˡˡ ˡᵃˢᵗ ⁿⁱᵍʰᵗ‧‧‧" ᴾˡᵃⁿᵏᵗᵒⁿ ˢⁱᵍʰᵉᵈ‧ ᴮᵉˢⁱᵈᵉˢ ᵗʰᵉ ʳᵃⁱⁿᶠᵃˡˡ⸴ ᵗʰᵉ ᵒⁿˡʸ ˢᵗᵒʳᵐ ˢᵒᵘⁿᵈˢ ʷᵉʳᵉ ˢᵒᵐᵉ ˡⁱᵍʰᵗ ʳᵘᵐᵇˡⁱⁿᵍ ⁱⁿ ᵗʰᵉ ᵈⁱˢᵗᵃⁿᶜᵉ‧ "ᴸᵉᵗ'ˢ ᵈᵒ ˢᵒᵐᵉ ᶜʰᵃʳᵃᵈᵉˢ‧‧‧" ᔆᵖᵒⁿᵍᵉᴮᵒᵇ ˢᵗᵃʳᵗᵉᵈ ᵃᶜᵗⁱⁿᵍ ᵃˢ ᴾˡᵃⁿᵏᵗᵒⁿ ˢᵗʳᵘᵍᵍˡᵉᵈ ᵗᵒ ʷᵃᵗᶜʰ‧ "ʸᵒᵘ ᵃ ᵐⁱᵐᵉ?" "ᴾˡᵃⁿᵏᵗᵒⁿ⸴ ʸᵒᵘ ᵐⁱᵍʰᵗ ᵇᵉ ᵗᵒ ᵗⁱʳᵉᵈ‧‧‧" ᴾˡᵃⁿᵏᵗᵒⁿ ᵗʳⁱᵉᵈ ᵗᵒ ᵍᵃᵗʰᵉʳ ᵃˡˡ ᵃⁿʸ ᵉⁿᵉʳᵍʸ ʰᵉ'ᵈ ᵗᵒ ᵗᵃᵏᵉ ᵃ ᵗᵘʳⁿ⸴ ᵗʳʸⁱⁿᵍ ᵗᵒ ᵈᵃⁿᶜᵉ‧ "ʸᵒᵘ ⁿᵉᵉᵈ ʳᵉˢᵗ‧‧‧" "ᔆᵖᵒⁿᵍᵉᵇᵒᵇ⸴ ᵖˡᵉᵃˢᵉ‧‧‧" ᴾˡᵃⁿᵏᵗᵒⁿ ᶠᵃˡᵗᵉʳᵉᵈ ʷᵉᵃᵏˡʸ ᵃˢ ᔆᵖᵒⁿᵍᵉᵇᵒᵇ ᶜᵃᵘᵍʰᵗ ʰⁱᵐ ˢᵗᵉᵃᵈⁱˡʸ ʳⁱᵍʰᵗ ᵇᵉᶠᵒʳᵉ ʰᵉ ᶜᵒᵘˡᵈ ᶠᵃˡˡ‧ ᴮᵃʳᵉˡʸ ᵃʷᵃᵏᵉ/ᵃˡᵉʳᵗ ᴾˡᵃⁿᵏᵗᵒⁿ ʷᵃˢ ᵗᵃᵏᵉⁿ ᵗᵒ ᵃ ʳᵒᶜᵏⁱⁿᵍ ᶜʰᵃⁱʳ‧ "ᴮᵘᵗ ᵗʰᵉ ˢᵗᵒʳᵐ‧‧‧" "ᴵ'ˡˡ ᵇᵉ ᵗᵃᵏⁱⁿᵍ ᵍᵒᵒᵈ ᶜᵃʳᵉ ᵒᶠ ʸᵒᵘ!" ᔆᵖᵒⁿᵍᵉᵇᵒᵇ ᵗʳⁱᵉᵈ ᵗᵒ ᵃˢˢᵘʳᵉ ʰⁱᵐ⸴ ᵇᵒᵗʰ ʰᵒˡᵈⁱⁿᵍ ʰᵃⁿᵈˢ‧ ᴱʸᵉ ᵇᵃʳᵉˡʸ ᵒᵖᵉⁿ ʰᵉ ʰᵃᵈⁿᵗ ᵗʰᵉ ˢᵗʳᵉⁿᵍᵗʰ ᵗᵒ ᵃʳᵍᵘᵉ‧ ᵀʰᵉ ʳᵃⁱⁿᶠᵃˡˡ ᵐᵃᵏⁱⁿᵍ ʰⁱᵐ ᵐᵒʳᵉ ᵈʳᵒʷˢʸ⸴ ᴾˡᵃⁿᵏᵗᵒⁿ ˢᵃᵗ ᵇᵃᶜᵏ ʷⁱᵗʰ ᔆᵖᵒⁿᵍᵉᴮᵒᵇ ᵒⁿ ᵗʰᵉ ʳᵒᶜᵏⁱⁿᵍ ᶜʰᵃⁱʳ⸴ ᔆᵖᵒⁿᵍᵉᴮᵒᵇ ᵍᵉⁿᵗˡʸ ʳᵒᶜᵏⁱⁿᵍ‧ ᔆᵖᵒⁿᵍᵉᵇᵒᵇ ˢᵐⁱˡᵉᵈ⸴ ˢᵉᵉⁱⁿᵍ ʰⁱᵐ ⁱᵐᵐᵉᵈⁱᵃᵗᵉˡʸ ᶠᵃˡˡ ⁱⁿᵗᵒ ᵃ ᵈᵉᵉᵖ ˢˡᵉᵉᵖ ⁱⁿˢᵗᵃⁿᵗˡʸ⸴ ˢᵗⁱˡˡ ʰᵒˡᵈⁱⁿᵍ ʰⁱˢ ʰᵃⁿᵈ‧ ᴾˡᵃⁿᵏᵗᵒⁿ ᵈⁱᵈⁿ'ᵗ ᵉᵛᵉⁿ ᶠˡⁱⁿᶜʰ ʷʰᵉⁿ ᔆᵖᵒⁿᵍᵉᵇᵒᵇ ʳᵉᵃᶜʰᵉᵈ ᵒᵛᵉʳ ᵃⁿᵈ ᵍᵒᵗ ᵗʰᵉ ᵇˡᵃⁿᵏᵉᵗ ᶠᵒʳ ʰⁱᵐ‧ "ᴴᵃᵛᵉ ᵃ ᵍᵒᵒᵈ ⁿᵃᵖ‧‧‧" ᴾˡᵃⁿᵏᵗᵒⁿ ᵈⁱᵈⁿ'ᵗ ᵐᵒᵛᵉ ᵘⁿᵗⁱˡ ᵗʰᵉ ˡᵃᵗᵉ ᵃᶠᵗᵉʳⁿᵒᵒⁿ ᵃᶠᵗᵉʳ ᵗʰᵉ ʳᵃⁱⁿ ˡᵉᵗ ᵘᵖ‧ "ᵂᵃⁿᵗ ᵐᵉ ᵗᵒ ᵗᵃᵏᵉ ʸᵒᵘ ᵗᵒ ᵗʰᵉ ᶜʰᵘᵐ ᵇᵘᶜᵏᵉᵗ?" "ᵀʰᵃⁿᵏˢ ᔆᵖᵒⁿᵍᵉᵇᵒᵇ‧"
Not ALL snoring is harmful. The reasons for snoring stem from the relaxation of throat muscles when you sleep. Less airway volume can mean that the relaxed throat vibrates when you breathe. It’s the universal cause of snoring (harmful or normal) The tongue is one of the main factors in snoring and sleeping with mouth open. During sleep, the muscles in the back of the mouth, nose, or throat become relaxed and breath flowing through the airway causes them to vibrate or flap. When you go to sleep, the primary muscles of your tongue and your throat relax. For you to keep your airway open, support muscles for the throat must hold firm. Not all snoring is sleep apnoea. Breathing noise or ‘snoring’ can be normal. The restricted airflow results in a rumbling, rattling sound that occurs when air flows past the relaxed tissues. Snoring sounds range from quiet whistling or vibrating to a loud grumbling, snorting, or rumbling. It results when the upper airway, specifically the throat and the nasal passage, vibrate from turbulent airflow during breathing while asleep. This commonly affects the soft palate and uvula, the tissue that hangs down at the back of the throat. Narrowing at the base of the tongue may also play a role. The root cause of snoring is when the air you’re breathing doesn’t flow smoothly through your nose and/or throat when you’re sleeping. Instead, it bumps into the surrounding tissues, which causes a vibration. The resulting vibration makes the snoring sound as you breathe. Your tongue position may also play a part. Snoring is caused by things such as your tongue, mouth, throat or airways in your nose vibrating as you breathe. It happens because these parts of your body relax and narrow when you're asleep. Sometimes it's caused by a condition like sleep apnoea, which is when your airways become temporarily blocked as you sleep. Snoring is the sound that air makes when it passes across the relaxed or loose tissues of the upper airway.
March 26, 2012 Sleep talking, or somniloquy, is the act of speaking during sleep. It can be gibberish or resemble normal speech. Sleep talkers usually seem to be talking to themselves. The utterances can take place occasionally causing people to call out, speak, or produce incoherent language during sleep. People can sometimes act out on their dreams depending on where they are in their sleep cycle. Sleep talking may also occur during transitory arousals when a sleeper transitions from one stage of sleep to another whilst asleep. Sleep talking episodes are typically brief. Most sleep talking takes the form of short phrases, moans, or mumbling. The central symptom of sleep talking is audible expression that occurs during sleep without the person being aware of it happening. It can be gibberish or resemble normal speech. With sleep talking, you may not necessarily be forming coherent words or sentences.
Mental confusion, also called delirium, is a change in a person’s awareness. Confusion affects how a person thinks, sees the world around them, and remembers things. The main signs of mental confusion or delirium are sudden changes in awareness. A person with confusion or delirium might suddenly get very sleepy and unaware of their surroundings or act very upset. Hypoactive, or low activity. Acting sleepy or withdrawn and "out of it." Hyperactive, or high activity. Acting upset, nervous, and agitated. Mixed. A combination of hypoactive and hyperactive confusion. The main symptom is a change in general awareness and consciousness. This may include: A shorter attention span Trouble remembering things, writing, or finding words Speech and thoughts that do not make sense Not knowing where they are, what day it is, or other facts Mixing up day and night and difficulty sleeping Personality changes, restlessness, anxiety, depression, or irritability Seeing things that others do not (hallucinating) or believing things that are not really happening (delusions)
Sleepcore : 😴😪🌛🌜🌚🌝🌙✨💫🌟⭐🌠💤📟🛏️🧸🌀💭🥛🍼🍪🐑🪫⏰✡️🌀☪️ Dreamcore :😶‍🌫️💤🌈👁️🌻🍄🫧☀️💫🗝☁️🕳️🔮🪬🔍📅💿📞🎭🖼️🪄👾🎱🪩⛓️🧚👼 Gorecore/bloodcore : 🧠🫀🫁🩸🦷🦴💀🥩🍖🩻⚰️🪦 Lovecore: 🫀❤️‍🔥❤️‍🩹❣️💟💔💘💝💖💗💓💞💕💌♥️❤️🧡💛💚💙💜🤎🖤🤍😻🥰😘😍😚💏👩‍❤️‍💋‍👨👨‍❤️‍💋‍👨👩‍❤️‍💋‍👩💑👩‍❤️‍👨👨‍❤️‍👨👩‍❤️‍👩🧑‍🤝‍🧑👭👬👫🌹💐🍓🍫💒🏩🎁🎀🧚👼 Kidcore : 🌈💫🍓🍬🍭🧁🍪🧃🍰🏫🎂🪅🧩🪁🎨🖍️🎭🧸🧮🪢🪆🎒🩹✏️🚼🎠🦄🪀🪃🫧🪩🧚🛼🩰🥏 Cutecore : 🧸🍰🌈🍓🍬🍭🧁🍪 🌸💮🪷🌷🌺🐇🍼🎀💌❤️💟🍡🍙🍥🧚 Weirdcore : 🌈🍄🌀💫🎊🧩📺📽️🖼️🎭📞🚪💊🧿☯️⚕️👁️‍🗨️👁️🩸🫧💉🧚👼 Clowncore : 🤡🤪🥳🔴🎉🎊🎈🎂🎀🎁🪅🎪🎠🎡🎢🖍️ 📌🔖🔮🍿🍭🍬🍦🤹🤹‍♀️🤹‍♂️🪀🃏🎱🎲🎭🎟️🐒🐘🐎🦁🩰🛼🎯🗡️💣 Angelcore : 🌹☁️💫👼🐚🕊️🕯️💌🪬👁️📜🪦🛡️🍙🍚🍥🌫️🌪️🌬️⭐🐇🦢⛪ Partycore : 🥳🤩😵‍💫🎉🎊🎈🎂🎀🎁🪅🎯🛹🛼🧩🎮🕹️👾🀄🪁🎲🎱🎨🖌️🎧🎭🎬🛍️ Webcore/Internetcore : 📱📟📠🔌🔋🪫💽💾💿📀🖥️💻⌨️🖨️🖱️🪙⚙️🪪📈🔍🧑‍💻👩‍💻👨‍💻🌀🌌🎮🕹️👾
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Tumblr | 10/6/2014 | 7:44pm | DO YOU? meeplol: Most people agree that dying while being asleep is the best way to dıe. Peaceful, not signs of tortur͘e nor paın. My grandma used to say angels carry them, the ones who are dying while being asleep, to heaven. But sometimes angels can be clumsy and drop them by accident. Remember the time you felt like falling in your sleep and suddenly woke up?
   ∧∧  ( ・ω・)   _| ⊃/(___  / └-(____/  ̄ ̄ ̄ ̄ ̄ ̄ ̄   <,⌒/ヽ-___ /<,3/____/
ʕuᴥuʔ。。。💤
https://www.dentalfearcentral.org/help/sedation-dentistry/general-anaesthetic/
https://www.uthscsa.edu/patient-care/dental/services/anesthesia
If you were sedated, you will be comfortable and drowsy. IV anesthesia lets you fall into a sleep-like state and prevents any paın can distort sensation and lack of fine motor control. The patient falls asleep and is completely unaware of the procedure being performed. Twilight sedation drifting in and out of sleep Once again some patients may be asleep while others will slip in and out of sleep. For example, patients may experience some short-term memory issues, they may have trouble making decisions, they may feel emotional and they may feel somewhat disoriented. Nitrous oxide Patients are able to breathe on their own and remain in control of all functions. The patient may experience mild amnesia and may fall asleep not remembering all of what happened during their appointment. When nitrous oxide is administered, the patient may feel a kind of dreamy light-headedness. Nitrous oxide tends to make you feel a bit funny and “floaty.” You may even laugh at things that are happening around you, which is why it’s also called “laughing gas.” However, this change in consciousness is very short-lived.
6/6/10 Perhaps your dentist has recommended you have your wisdom teeth removed. IV sedation allows patients to nap during the surgery. The anesthesia medications are given through the IV line and you’ll feel quite tired and sleepy. Once you are completely asleep and comfortable, the surgeon places local anesthesia to numb the extraction areas. A rubber bite block helps to support your jaw during surgery and also keeps your mouth open if you are being sedated. Anesthesia medications are given as needed to make sure you remain asleep and comfortable. If IV sedation was administered, you will awaken shortly after surgery and be escorted to the recovery room. Your mouth will feel numb from the local anesthesia which will help keep you comfortable and pain free. At end of surgery, you will awake to a tap on your shoulder and a gentle voice. The surgeon will reassure you that surgery is finished and everything went well. Monitors and IV are removed and you are escorted to the recovery room. A few minutes later, your loved ones can keep you company as you recover from the anesthesia. During this time, you will become increasingly awake and alert and gradually be able to standup by your self. You are then escorted to the car.
ᵀⁱᵐᵉ ᵃᶠᵗᵉʳ ᵗⁱᵐᵉ pt. 3 ⁽ˢᵖᵒⁿᵍᵉᵇᵒᵇ ᶠᵃⁿᶠⁱᶜ⁾ ʷᵃʳⁿⁱⁿᵍ ᶠᵒʳ ᵛⁱᵒˡᵉⁿᵗ, ᵘᵖˢᵉᵗᵗⁱⁿᵍ ᵂʰᵉⁿᶜᵉ ᵗʰᵉ ᶜˡⁱⁿⁱᶜⁱᵃⁿ ᶜᵃˡˡᵉᵈ⸴ ᴹʳ‧ ᴷʳᵃᵇˢ ʳᵘˢʰᵉᵈ ᵗᵒ ᵗʰᵉ ʰᵉᵃˡᵗʰ ᶜᵉⁿᵗʳᵉ⸴ ˢᶜᵃʳᵉᵈ ᶠᵒʳ ᵗʰᵉ ʷᵒʳˢᵗ‧ "ᴵ ᶜᵃᵐᵉ‧‧‧" ᴹʳ‧ ᴷʳᵃᵇˢ ˢᵃʷ ᴾˡᵃⁿᵏᵗᵒⁿ ˢᵗⁱˡˡ ˡⁱᵐᵖ ʷⁱᵗʰ ᵗʰᵉⁱʳ ᶜᵒⁿᶠᵉˢˢ ᵃ ᵇᵉᵃʳ ʳⁱᵍʰᵗ ᵇʸ ʰⁱᵐ‧ "ᴹʳ‧ ᴷʳᵃᵇˢ⸴ ʷᵉ ᵒⁿˡʸ ᵈᵒ ⁱᵗ ᵃˢ ᵃ ˡᵃˢᵗ ʳᵉˢᵒʳᵗ⸴ ᵇᵘᵗ ⁱᶠ ʰᵉ'ˢ ᵉᵛᵉⁿ ᵍᵒⁱⁿᵍ ᵗᵒ ˢᵘʳᵛⁱᵛᵉ ʷᵉ ⁿᵉᵉᵈ ᵗᵒ ᵗᵃᵏᵉ ᵗʰᵉ ʳⁱˢᵏ; ⁱᵗ'ˡˡ ᵉⁱᵗʰᵉʳ ʰᵉˡᵖ ʰⁱᵐ⸴ ᵒʳ ⁱᵗ ᵐⁱᵍʰᵗ ᵇᵉ ᵗʰᵉ ᵉⁿᵈ‧‧‧" "ᴵ ᵈᵒⁿ'ᵗ‧‧‧" "ᔆᵒᵐᵉᵗⁱᵐᵉˢ ⁱᵗ ʷᵒʳᵏˢ⸴ ᵇᵘᵗ ᵒᵗʰᵉʳ ᵗⁱᵐᵉˢ ⁱᵗ ᶜᵃⁿ ⁱʳʳᵉᵛᵉʳˢⁱᵇˡʸ ᵒᵛᵉʳʷʰᵉˡᵐ ᵗʰᵉ ᵖᵃᵗⁱᵉⁿᵗ‧ ᴱᵛᵉⁿ ⁱᶠ ⁱᵗ ʷᵒʳᵏˢ⸴ ᵗʰᵉʳᵉ'ˢ ˢᵗⁱˡˡ ⁿᵒ ᵍᵘᵃʳᵃⁿᵗᵉᵉ ʰᵉ ʷⁱˡˡ ᵇᵉ ᵗʰᵉ ˢᵃᵐᵉ‧‧‧" ᴹʳ‧ ᴷʳᵃᵇˢ ᵇˡⁱⁿᵏᵉᵈ‧ "ᴬᵐⁿᵉˢⁱᵃ ʷⁱˡˡ ᵒᶜᶜᵘʳ⸴ ᵃˢˢᵘᵐⁱⁿᵍ ʰᵉ ˢᵘʳᵛⁱᵛᵉˢ; ᵗᵒ ʷʰᵃᵗ ᵉˣᵗᵉⁿᵗ⸴ ᵒⁿˡʸ ᵗⁱᵐᵉ ʷⁱˡˡ ᵗᵉˡˡ‧ ᴴⁱˢ ᵐᵉᵐᵒʳʸ ᵐⁱᵍʰᵗ ᶜᵒᵐᵉ ᵇᵃᶜᵏ ᵉᵛᵉⁿᵗᵘᵃˡˡʸ⸴ ʸᵒᵘ'ˡˡ ᵏⁿᵒʷ ʷⁱᵗʰⁱⁿ ᵗʰᵉ ᵉⁿᵈ ᵒᶠ ᵗʰᵉ ʷᵉᵉᵏ‧ ᵂʰᵃᵗ'ˢ ᵍᵒⁱⁿᵍ ᵗᵒ ʰᵃᵖᵖᵉⁿ ⁱˢ ᵗʰᵉ ᵐᵉᵈⁱᶜⁱⁿᵉ ʷⁱˡˡ ˢᵗᵃᵇⁱˡⁱˢᵉ ᵗʰᵉ ᵇʳᵃⁱⁿ⸴ ᵃⁿᵈ ʰᵉ'ᵈ ᵇᵉ ᵇʳᵃıⁿ ᵈᵉ́ᵃ́ᵈ ⁱᶠ ʷᵉ ʷᵃⁱᵗ ᵐᵘᶜʰ ˡᵒⁿᵍᵉʳ‧‧‧" ᴹʳ‧ ᴷʳᵃᵇˢ ʳᵉᵖᵉᵃᵗᵉᵈ ᵗʰᵉ ʷʰᵒˡᵉ ᵗʰⁱⁿᵍ ᵒⁿᶜᵉ ᵗʰᵉ ᶜˡⁱⁿⁱᶜⁱᵃⁿ ᵍᵃᵛᵉ ᵗʰᵉᵐ ˢᵖᵃᶜᵉ‧ "ᵂʰᵃᵗᵉᵛᵉʳ ʰᵃᵖᵖᵉⁿˢ⸴ ᴵ ʷᵃⁿᵗ ʸᵒᵘ ᵗᵒ ᵏⁿᵒʷ ᴵ ᶜᵃʳᵉ ᵃᵇᵒᵘᵗ ʸᵒᵘ ᵃⁿᵈ ⁿᵉᵛᵉʳ ᵐᵉᵃⁿᵗ ᶠᵒʳ ᵃⁿʸᵗʰⁱⁿᵍ ᵗᵒ ʰᵃᵖᵖᵉⁿ ᵗᵒ ʸᵒᵘ‧" ᴬᵗ ᶠⁱʳˢᵗ⸴ ᵉᵛᵉʳʸᵗʰⁱⁿᵍ ʷᵃˢ ᵈᵃʳᵏ⸴ ᵐᵃᶜʰⁱⁿᵉʳʸ ᵇᵉᵉᵖⁱⁿᵍ ⁿᵒⁱˢᵉˢ ᵉᶜʰᵒⁱⁿᵍ ᵇᵘᵗ ᵍʳᵃᵈᵘᵃˡˡʸ ᵍᵉᵗᵗⁱⁿᵍ ˡᵒᵘᵈᵉʳ‧ ᵀʰᵉ ᶜˡⁱⁿⁱᶜⁱᵃⁿ ᵈⁱᵈⁿ'ᵗ ʷᵃⁿᵗ ᵗᵒ ᵇᵒᵐᵇᵃʳᵈ ᵗʰᵉ ᵈᵃᶻᵉᵈ ᵖᵃᵗⁱᵉⁿᵗ ᵒᵛᵉʳʷʰᵉˡᵐⁱⁿᵍˡʸ⸴ ʸᵉᵗ ʰᵉ ⁿᵒᵗⁱᶜᵉᵈ ʰⁱᵐ ʳᵉᵛⁱᵛⁱⁿᵍ‧ ᵀʰᵉ ᶠⁱʳˢᵗ ᵗʰⁱⁿᵍ ʰᵉ ᶜᵒᵘˡᵈ ᵗᵉˡˡ ᵃˢ ʰᵉ ˡᵒᵒᵏᵉᵈ ᵃʳᵒᵘⁿᵈ ʷᵃˢ ᵗʰᵉ ᶜᵒⁿᶠᵉˢˢ ᵃ ᵇᵉᵃʳ⸴ ᵃᶠᵗᵉʳ ʰⁱˢ ᵉʸᵉ ᵃᵈʲᵘˢᵗᵉᵈ‧ "ᴴⁱ; ʸᵒᵘ'ʳᵉ ᵃᵗ ᵗʰᵉ ʰᵉᵃˡᵗʰ ᶜᵉⁿᵗʳᵉ‧‧‧" ᔆᵉᵉⁱⁿᵍ ʰᵉ ˢᵘʳᵛⁱᵛᵉˢ⸴ ʰᵉ ʷᵃⁿᵗᵉᵈ ᵗᵒ ⁿᵒᵗⁱᶠʸ ᴹʳ‧ ᴷʳᵃᵇˢ‧ "ᴵ ᵃᵐ ᵍˡᵃᵈ ʸᵒᵘ ᶜᵃᵐᵉ ᵒᵘᵗ‧‧‧" ᴾˡᵃⁿᵏᵗᵒⁿ ˢᵗʳᵃⁱᵍʰᵗᵉⁿˢ ʰⁱᵐˢᵉˡᶠ ᵘᵖ⸴ ⁱⁿᵗᵉʳʳᵘᵖᵗⁱⁿᵍ‧ "ᵂʰᵃᵗ'ˢ ʰᵃᵖᵖᵉⁿⁱⁿᵍ‧‧‧" "ʸᵒᵘ ʰᵃᵛᵉ ᵃ ᵛⁱˢⁱᵗᵒʳ; ᴵ'ᵐ ˢᵘʳᵉ ʰᵉ ᶜᵃⁿ ʰᵉˡᵖ ʸᵒᵘ ʳᵉᵍᵃⁱⁿ‧‧‧" "ᴵ ᵈᵒⁿ'ᵗ ᵏⁿᵒʷ ʷʰ‧‧‧" "ᴵ'ˡˡ ᵇᵉ ᵇᵃᶜᵏ ʷⁱᵗʰ ᵗʰᵉ ᵛⁱˢⁱᵗᵒʳ‧" ᴹʳ‧ ᴷʳᵃᵇˢ ˢᵃʷ ᵗʰᵉ ᶜˡⁱⁿⁱᶜⁱᵃⁿ ᶠⁱⁿᵃˡˡʸ‧ "ᴴᵉ'ˢ ᵍᵒⁱⁿᵍ ᵗᵒ ˡⁱᵛᵉ⸴ ᵇᵘᵗ ⁱˢ ᶜᵒⁿᶠᵘˢᵉᵈ‧ ᔆᵗⁱˡˡ ᶜᵃⁿ ⁿᵒᵗ ᵗᵉˡˡ ʷʰᵃᵗ ʰᵉ'ᵈ ʳᵉᵐᵉᵐᵇᵉʳ‧‧‧" ᴹʳ‧ ᴷʳᵃᵇˢ ʷᵉⁿᵗ ᵃⁿᵈ ᶠᵒˡˡᵒʷᵉᵈ ʰⁱᵐ ⁱⁿ ᵗʰᵉ ᵃʳᵉᵃ ᵖˡᵃⁿᵏᵗᵒⁿ'ˢ ʳᵉᶜᵒᵛᵉʳⁱⁿᵍ ⁱⁿ‧‧‧ to be cont. Pt. 4
https://pubs.asahq.org/anesthesiology/article/96/5/1250/40049/An-Unexplained-DeathHannah-Greener-and-Chloroform
General anesthesia is a combination of medications that provide loss of consciousness, prevent memory formation, and eliminate pain. This allows a patient to have surgery without any memory of the event and to be completely pain free during the procedure. Most will get a little silly and lightheaded, thence may not even remember things about. The goal of general anesthesia is to make a person unconscious and keep him or her that way throughout a procedure. This is so the patient has no awareness or recollection of this procedure, so they have no knowledge it even happened. General anesthesia does a number of things on top of making a person unconscious. It relieves anxiety, minimizes pain, relaxes muscles (to keep the patient still), and helps block out the memory of the procedure itself. Most of the time, when you wake up and the anesthesia effect wears off, you will be confused and overwhelmed, even completely unaware of surroundings. Some will be talking without knowing what they’re saying.
General anaesthesia is a state of controlled unconsciousness. During a general anaesthetic, medicines are used to send you to sleep, so you're unaware of surgery and do not move or feel pain while it's carried out. General anaesthesia is used for surgical procedures where it's safer or more comfortable for you to be unconscious. It's usually used for long operations or those that would otherwise be very painful. Just before you have surgery, you'll usually be taken to a room where your anaesthetist will give you the general anaesthetic. It will either be given as a: liquid that's injected into your veins through a cannula (a thin, plastic tube that feeds into a vein, usually on the back of your hand) gas that you breathe in through a mask The anaesthetic should take effect very quickly. The anaesthetist will stay with you throughout the procedure. They'll make sure you continue to receive the anaesthetic and that you stay in a controlled state of unconsciousness. They'll also give you painkilling medicine into your veins, so that you're comfortable when you wake up. Recovery After your operation, the anaesthetist will stop the anaesthetic and you'll gradually wake up. You'll usually be in a recovery room at first, before being transferred to a ward. General anaesthetics can affect your memory, concentration and reflexes for a day or two, so it's important for a responsible adult to stay with you for at least 24 hours after your operation, if you're allowed to go home.
https://www.sleepfoundation.org/parasomnias/hypnic-jerks
ᵀⁱᵐᵉ ᵃᶠᵗᵉʳ ᵗⁱᵐᵉ pt. 2 ⁽ˢᵖᵒⁿᵍᵉᵇᵒᵇ ᶠᵃⁿᶠⁱᶜ⁾ ʷᵃʳⁿⁱⁿᵍ ᶠᵒʳ ᵛⁱᵒˡᵉⁿᵗ, ᵘᵖˢᵉᵗᵗⁱⁿᵍ ᴱᵛᵉⁿ ᵃˢ ᴹʳ‧ ᴷʳᵃᵇˢ ᵃᵇˡᵉ ᵗᵒ ᵍᵒ ʰᵒᵐᵉ ʰᵉ ᵏᵉᵖᵗ ᵍᵒⁱⁿᵍ ᵇᵃᶜᵏ ᶠᵒʳ ᴾˡᵃⁿᵏᵗᵒⁿ‧ ᴴᵉ ᵗᵒˡᵈ ᴷᵃʳᵉⁿ ᵖᵉʳˢᵒⁿᵃˡˡʸ⸴ ᵗᵒ ᶠⁱⁿᵈ ᵗʰᵉʸ ʰᵃᵛᵉ ᶜᵃˡˡᵉᵈ ʰᵉʳ ᵇᵉᶠᵒʳᵉ‧ ᴵᵗ'ˢ ᵗʰᵉ ᵐᵒʳⁿⁱⁿᵍ ᵃᶠᵗᵉʳ ᵗʰᵉ ˢᵉᵃ ʳʰⁱⁿᵒᶜᵉʳᵒˢ ᵃᵗᵗᵃᶜᵏ⸴ ʷʰᵉʳᵉ ᴾˡᵃⁿᵏᵗᵒⁿ ˢᵃᵛᵉᵈ ᴹʳ‧ ᴷʳᵃᵇˢ ˡⁱᶠᵉ ᵇʸ ˢᵃᶜʳⁱᶠⁱᶜⁱⁿᵍ ʰⁱˢ‧‧‧ "ᴵ ˢᵉᵉ ʸᵒᵘ'ᵛᵉ ʳᵉᵗᵘʳⁿᵉᵈ ᴹʳ‧ ᴷʳᵃᵇˢ‧‧‧" "ᴵ ʲᵘˢᵗ ʷᵃⁿⁿᵃ ˢᵉᵉ ᵗᵒ ᴾˡᵃⁿᵏᵗᵒⁿ‧" ᴹʳ‧ ᴷʳᵃᵇˢ ˢᵃᵗ ʳⁱᵍʰᵗ ᵇʸ ᴾˡᵃⁿᵏᵗᵒⁿ'ˢ ˢⁱᵈᵉ‧ "ᔆʰᵉˡᵈᵒⁿ ᵖˡᵉᵃˢᵉ‧‧‧" ᴷʳᵃᵇˢ ᵗʳⁱᵉᵈ ⁿᵒᵗ ᵗᵒ ˢᵒᵇ‧ "ᴵ ʷᵒᵘˡᵈⁿ'ᵗ ᵉᵛᵉⁿ ᵇᵉ ᵐᵃᵈ ⁱᶠ ⁱᵗ'ˢ ᵃⁿᵒᵗʰᵉʳ ᵖˡᵃⁿ ᵒᶠ ʸᵒᵘʳˢ; ᴵ ʲᵘˢᵗ ʷᵃⁿⁿᵃ ᵏⁿᵒʷ ʸᵉˡˡ ᵇᵉ ᶠⁱⁿᵉ! ᴵᶠ ʸᵒᵘ ᶜᵃⁿ ʰᵉᵃʳ ᵐᵉ ᵍⁱᵛᵉ ᵐᵉ ᵃ ˢⁱᵍⁿ‧‧‧" ᴾˡᵃⁿᵏᵗᵒⁿ ᵒᶠ ᶜᵒᵘʳˢᵉ ᵈⁱᵈⁿ'ᵗ ʳᵉˢᵖᵒⁿᵈ ⁱⁿ ᵗʰᵉ ˢˡⁱᵍʰᵗᵉˢᵗ‧ "ᴵ'ᵈ ᵇᵉ ʰᵃᵖᵖʸ ⁱᶠ ʸᵒᵘ ⁱⁿˢᵘˡᵗᵉᵈ ᵐᵉ! ʸᵒᵘ ᵏⁿᵒʷ⸴ ʸᵒᵘʳ ʷⁱᶠᵉ ᵐⁱˢˢᵉˢ ʸᵒᵘ; ʷᵉ ᵃˡˡ ᵈᵒ‧‧‧" ᴹʳ‧ ᴷʳᵃᵇˢ ᶜᵃˡˡᵉᵈ ʰⁱˢ ᵉᵐᵖˡᵒʸᵉᵉˢ ᵗᵒ ᶜˡᵒˢᵉ ᵗʰᵉ ᵏʳᵘˢᵗʸ ᵏʳᵃᵇ ᵃⁿᵈ ˡᵉᵃᵛᵉ ⁱᵗ ᵃˢ ˢᵘᶜʰ ᵘⁿᵗⁱˡ ᴾˡᵃⁿᵏᵗᵒⁿ'ˢ ˢᵗᵃᵗᵉ ˢᵒᵐᵉʰᵒʷ ᶜʰᵃⁿᵍᵉˢ‧ "ʸᵒᵘ ⁿᵉᵉᵈ ᵗᵒ ᵇᵉ ᵖˡᵃⁿⁿⁱⁿᵍ ᵗᵒ ᵈᵒᵐⁱⁿᵃᵗᵉ⸴ ⁿᵒᵗ ᵇᵉ ⁱⁿ ᶜʳⁱᵗⁱᶜᵃˡ ᶜᵒⁿᵈⁱᵗⁱᵒⁿ!" ᴹʳ‧ ᴷʳᵃᵇˢ ᵗʰᵃⁿᵏᵉᵈ ᵗʰᵉ ᶜˡⁱⁿⁱᶜⁱᵃⁿ ᵃⁿᵈ ˡᵉᶠᵗ ᶠᵒʳ ᵗʰᵉ ᵈᵃʸ‧ ᴮᵘᵗ ʲᵘˢᵗ ᵗʰᵉ ⁿᵉˣᵗ ᵈᵃʸ ʰᵒʷᵉᵛᵉʳ⸴ ᴹʳ‧ ᴷʳᵃᵇˢ ᵈⁱᵈⁿ'ᵗ ᶜᵒᵐᵉ ᵉᵐᵖᵗʸ ʰᵃⁿᵈᵉᵈ; ʰᵉ ᵇʳᵒᵘᵍʰᵗ ᵃ ˢᵗᵘᶠᶠᵉᵈ ᵗᵒʸ ᵗᵉᵈᵈʸ ᵇᵉᵃʳ ᶠʳᵒᵐ ᵗʰᵉⁱʳ ᶜʰⁱˡᵈʰᵒᵒᵈ⸴ ᶜᵃˡˡᵉᵈ ᶜᵒⁿᶠᵉˢˢⁱᵒⁿ ᵇᵉᵃʳ‧ ᴴᵉ ᵗᵒˡᵈ ᔆᵖᵒⁿᵍᵉᴮᵒᵇ ᵃᵇᵒᵘᵗ ᶜᵒⁿᶠᵉˢˢⁱᵒⁿ ᵇᵉᵃʳ⸴ ʷʰᵒ ᵗʰᵉⁿ ᵖʳᵉᵗᵉⁿᵈᵉᵈ ᵗᵒ ᵇᵉ ᵒⁿᵉ ᵗᵒ ˢᵖʸ ᵒⁿ ᴾᵃᵗʳⁱᶜᵏ‧ ᶜᵒⁿᶠᵉˢˢⁱᵒⁿ ᵇᵉᵃʳ ʷᵃˢ ʲᵘˢᵗ ʷʰᵃᵗ ᵗʰᵉʸ ᶜᵃˡˡᵉᵈ ⁱᵗ⸴ ᵃˢ ᵗʰᵉʸ ᵇʳᵒᵘᵍʰᵗ ⁱᵗ ʷʰᵉⁿ ˢᵗᵃʸⁱⁿᵍ ᵒᵛᵉʳ ʷⁱᵗʰ ᵉᵃᶜʰ ᵒᵗʰᵉʳ ᵃˢ ʸᵒᵘᵗʰˢ‧ ᴬˡᵗʰᵒᵘᵍʰ ʲᵘˢᵗ ᵃ ʳᵉᵍᵘˡᵃʳ ᵖˡᵘˢʰⁱᵉ⸴ ⁱᵗ ˢᵗⁱˡˡ ʰᵉˡᵈ ᵛᵃˡᵘᵉ‧ ᴹʳ‧ ᴷʳᵃᵇˢ ᵒⁿˡʸ ˡᵉᶠᵗ ʷʰᵉⁿ ᵛⁱˢⁱᵗⁱⁿᵍ ʰᵒᵘʳˢ ʰᵃᵛᵉ ᵉⁿᵈᵉᵈ‧ ᵂʰᵉⁿ ᵗʰᵉ ⁿᵉˣᵗ ᵈᵃʸ ᶜᵃᵐᵉ⸴ ᵗʰᵉ ᶜˡⁱⁿⁱᶜⁱᵃⁿ ᶜᵃˡˡᵉᵈ ᴹʳ‧ ᴷʳᵃᵇˢ‧ "ᴷⁿᵒʷⁱⁿᵍ ʸᵒᵘ ˡᵒᵒᵏᵉᵈ ᵒᵘᵗ ᶠᵒʳ ᵗʰᵉ ᵖᵃᵗⁱᵉⁿᵗ⸴ ᴵ ᵗʰᵒᵘᵍʰᵗ ʸᵒᵘ'ᵈ ʷᵃⁿᵗ ᵗᵒ ˢᵉᵉ ʰⁱᵐ‧ ᴵᶠ ˢᵒ ʸᵒᵘ ⁿᵉᵉᵈ ᵗᵒ ʰᵘʳʳʸ‧" ᴵˢ ʰᵉ‧‧‧" "ᔆⁱʳ⸴ ᵗʰᵉʳᵉ'ˢ ⁿᵒ ᵗⁱᵐᵉ ᵗᵒ ᵉˣᵖˡᵃⁱⁿ ʰⁱˢ ˢᵗᵃᵗᵉ; ⁱᶠ ʸᵒᵘ ᵍᵒ ⁿᵒʷ⸴ ʸᵒᵘ ᵐⁱᵍʰᵗ ʰᵃᵛᵉ ʲᵘˢᵗ ᵉⁿᵒᵘᵍʰ ᵗⁱᵐᵉ ᵗᵒ ʰᵃᵛᵉ ᵒⁿᵉ ᵐᵒʳᵉ ᵐᵒᵐᵉⁿᵗ ᵃˡᵒⁿᵉ ʷⁱᵗʰ ʰⁱᵐ‧‧‧" to be cont. Pt. 3
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• 3y ago • Doctor in the UK here The NHS information on the pap (smear test we call it here) is fairly comprehensive: https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/cervical-screening/why-its-important/ The recommendation here is if you have ever had any such contact then you should have regular screening. In the UK you may choose not to have screening if you've never had said contact, as a) the majority of change and cancers are caused by HPV, which is transmitted and b) changes and cancers not caused by HPV don't tend to be detected by screening (the pap smear) but by symptoms (intermenstrual abnormal discharge) instead You should never feel pressured into an examination., and you always have the option of declining to answer a question, receive all or any part of an examination, or have an investigation such as a bløød test̕ or imaging study. It's called "shared decision making" and I encourage all patıents to ask 3 questions if they're ever unsure: What are my options? What are the pros and cons of each option for me? How do I get support to help me make a decision that is right for me?
Children with autism exhibit a higher general and anxietʏ, due to altered sensory sensibilities. Autism or autistic disorder is a severe developmental disability that is characterised by an impairment in mutual social interactions, communication skills, and repetitive patterns of behaviours. They can also show an increased sensitivity to sounds, light, odours, and colours. The attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) was the most common disorder associated with the autistic group (71%) and the epilepsy with the control group (52%) (P < 0.089) It's important for the clinicians to know how to manage these affecting patıents in developmental age, ensuring an adequate and minimally invasive management using a prompt approach, when possible. So, a good communication can help to establish trust and build needed cooperation throughout the visit and treatment. All patıents in developmental age, especially with health disorders, need experienced doctors who know how to face promptly tr4uma under general anaesthesia, if possible. Moreover, a parent-reported questionnaire method would also help overcome this deficiency, provided that the parents remember all past tr4uma events of their children. Respondents often cited conflict between understanding the additional needs for successful treatment of autistic patıents and a lack of resources to implement support strategies. Despite this, some were positive about making the necessary modifications to support autistic patıents. Professionals should adapt their practises to meet the needs of their autistic patıents. Autism is a developmental condition associated with social communication difficulties, and the presence of rigid, repetitive behaviours and atypical sensory sensitivities. As such, the nature of procedures and the treatment environment may prove a particularly challenging area for individuals on the autistic spectrum. In particular, sensory atypicalities may pose a barrier to treatment. Many autistic individuals are hypersensitive to a multitude of stimuli such as bright lights, noise and touch. Further autism-specific challenges include communication difficulties between practitioner and patient, which has been reported to be a key element in failed or unpleasant visits for autistic adults. Given the bidirectional nature of communication, the practitioner clearly plays a crucial role in overcoming this area of challenge. Autistic people have reported significant difficulties in accessing adequate care. Five main themes emerged from these responses: (1) understanding individual needs, (2) the key role of communication, (3) the value of autism specific techniques; (4) a conflict between needs and resources and (5) positive and rewarding work. To ensure successful treatment, the individual needs of each patient needs to be taken into consideration, as it affects each client differently. Given the variability in needs and preferences of autistic people, an overreliance on personal experiences may lead to professionals offering 'one-size-fits-all' accommodations, consequently producing more discomfort for the patıents. It was encouraging, however, to see a number of respondents in the current study flag up an understanding of this individuality, and the need for a tailored approach. Indeed, a considerable number of respondents reported not being aware of any techniques available to reduce possible discomfort in autistic patıents. Autism (congenital or acquired) and symptoms are not a chøice.
ᴸᵉᵍ ᵘᵖ ⁽ᔆᵖᵒⁿᵍᵉᴮᵒᵇ ᶠᵃⁿᶠⁱᶜ⁾ ᵀʰᵉ ʳᵒᶜᵏʸ ᵇᵒᵗᵗᵒᵐ ᵒᶠ ᵗʰᵉ ˢʰᵃˡˡᵒʷ ˡᵃᵏᵉ ˢᵖᵒⁿᵍᵉ ᵇᵒᵇ ᵃⁿᵈ ˢᑫᵘⁱᵈʷᵃʳᵈ ʷᵉʳᵉ ᵃᵗ‧ ᴾˡᵃⁿᵏᵗᵒⁿ ˢᵖⁱᵉᵈ ᵒⁿ ᵗʰᵉᵐ⸴ ʳᵘⁿⁿⁱⁿᵍ ʷʰᵉⁿ ʰⁱˢ ᶠᵒᵒᵗ ˢˡⁱᵖᵖᵉᵈ ᶠʳᵒᵐ ᵘⁿᵈᵉʳ ʰⁱᵐ⸴ ᵗʰᵉ ˢᵃᵐᵉ ˡᵉᵍ ʰⁱᵗᵗⁱⁿᵍ ᵗʰᵉ ʳᵒᶜᵏ‧ ᴮᵒᵗʰ ᵒᶠ ᵗʰᵉᵐ ʰᵉᵃʳᵈ ᵃ ᶜʳᵃᶜᵏ ˢᵒᵘⁿᵈ⸴ ᵗᵘʳⁿⁱⁿᵍ ᵃʳᵒᵘⁿᵈ ᵗᵒ ˢᵉᵉ ʰⁱᵐ ᶠᵃˡˡ ᵒⁿ ʰⁱˢ ˡᵉᵍ ᵃᵍᵃⁱⁿˢᵗ‧ ʸᵒᵘ ˢᵉᵉ⸴ ᴹʳ‧ ᴷʳᵃᵇˢ ˢᵉⁿᵗ ʰⁱˢ ᵗʷᵒ ᵉᵐᵖˡᵒʸᵉᵉˢ ᵗᵒ ᵇᵒⁿᵈ ʷʰⁱˡᵉ ʰᵉ ˢᵗᵃʸᵉᵈ ᵃᵗ ˢᵖᵒⁿᵍᵉᵇᵒᵇˢ ʰᵒᵐᵉ ᵇᵉᶜᵃᵘˢᵉ ᵖᵉᵃʳˡ ʷᵃˢ ʰᵃᵛⁱⁿᵍ ᵃ ᵍⁱʳˡˢ ᵈᵃʸ ᵃᵗ ᵗʰᵉ ʰᵒᵘˢᵉ‧ "ᵂᵉ ˢʰᵒᵘˡᵈ ᵗᵃᵏᵉ ʰⁱᵐ ᵗᵒ ʸᵒᵘʳ ᵖˡᵃᶜᵉ!" ᔆᵖᵒⁿᵍᵉᵇᵒᵇ ᵗᵒˡᵈ ˢᑫᵘⁱᵈʷᵃʳᵈ⸴ ᵗʳʸⁱⁿᵍ ᵗᵒ ᵖⁱᶜᵏ ᵘᵖ ᴾˡᵃⁿᵏᵗᵒⁿ ᵘᵖ‧ ᴾˡᵃⁿᵏᵗᵒⁿ ˢᵗʳᵘᵍᵍˡᵉᵈ ᵗᵒ ˢᵗᵃⁿᵈ ᵘᵖ⸴ ʰⁱˢ ˡᵉᵍ ᵖʳᵉᵛᵉⁿᵗˢ ʰⁱᵐ ᶠʳᵒᵐ ᵈᵒⁱⁿᵍ ˢᵒ‧ ᵀʰᵉʸ ᵗᵒᵒᵏ ʰⁱᵐ ᵗᵒ ˢᑫᵘⁱᵈʷᵃʳᵈ'ˢ‧ ᵀʰᵉʸ ˢᵉᵗ ʰⁱᵐ ᵈᵒʷⁿ‧ "ʸᵒᵘ ʰᵒˡᵈ ˢᵗⁱˡˡ‧‧‧" ᔆᑫᵘⁱᵈʷᵃʳᵈ ᵗᵒˡᵈ ᴾˡᵃⁿᵏᵗᵒⁿ ᵃˢ ʰᵉ ᵈᵒᶜᵗᵒʳᵉᵈ ᵗʰᵉ ˡᵉᵍ‧ "ᴾˡᵃⁿᵏⁱᵉ ᵈᵒ ʸᵒᵘ ⁿᵉᵉᵈ ᵃ ʰᵉᵃᵗⁱⁿᵍ ᵖᵃᵈ‧‧‧" "ᑫᵘⁱᵗ ᵇᵃᵇʸⁱⁿᵍ ᵐᵉ⸴ ᔆᵖᵒⁿᵍᵉᵇᵒᵇ!" ᴴᵉ ˢⁿᵃᵖᵖᵉᵈ‧ ᔆᵖᵒⁿᵍᵉᵇᵒᵇ ʷᵉⁿᵗ ᵗᵒ ˢᑫᵘⁱᵈʷᵃʳᵈ ⁱⁿ ᵗᵉᵃʳˢ ᵃᶠᵗᵉʳ ᵃⁿ ᵃʷᵏʷᵃʳᵈ ˢⁱˡᵉⁿᶜᵉ ᵃᵗ ᵗʰᵉ ᵒᵘᵗᵇᵘʳˢᵗ‧ "ᔆᵖᵒⁿᵍᵉᴮᵒᵇ'ˢ ᵒⁿˡʸ ᵗʳʸⁱⁿᵍ ᵗᵒ ʰᵉˡᵖ ʸᵒᵘ ᵈⁱᵐʷⁱᵗ!" "ᔆᑫᵘⁱᵈʷᵃʳᵈ⸴ ᵈᵒⁿ'ᵗ ᵇᵉ ᵘᵖˢᵉᵗ ᵖˡᵉᵃˢᵉ‧‧‧" ᔆᵖᵒⁿᵍᵉᵇᵒᵇ ᵗᵒˡᵈ ʰⁱᵐ‧ ᵂᵃᵗᶜʰⁱⁿᵍ ᵗʰᵉᵐ ʰᵃᵈ ᴾˡᵃⁿᵏᵗᵒⁿ ᶠᵉᵉˡ ᵉᵛᵉⁿ ᵐᵒʳᵉ ˡᵉᶠᵗᵒᵘᵗ⸴ ˢᵉᵉⁱⁿᵍ ᔆᵖᵒⁿᵍᵉᵇᵒᵇ ᶜᵒᵐᶠᵒʳᵗ ˢᑫᵘⁱᵈʷᵃʳᵈ‧ ᴺᵒᵗ ᵐᵘᶜʰ ᵒⁿ ˡᵒᵛᵉ ˡᵃⁿᵍᵘᵃᵍᵉ⸴ ᴾˡᵃⁿᵏᵗᵒⁿ ᵗʳⁱᵉᵈ ᵗᵒ ᵗʰⁱⁿᵏ ᵒᶠ ˢᵒᵐᵉ ᵗʰⁱⁿᵍ ᵗᵒ ˢᵃʸ‧ "ᔆᵖᵒⁿᵍᵉ‧‧‧" "ᶻⁱᵖ ⁱᵗ ᴾˡᵃⁿᵏᵗᵒⁿ!" ᔆᑫᵘⁱᵈʷᵃʳᵈ ⁱⁿᵗᵉʳʳᵘᵖᵗᵉᵈ⸴ ᵐᵃᵏⁱⁿᵍ ʰⁱᵐ ˢʰʳⁱⁿᵏ ᵇᵃᶜᵏ‧ ᴬᶠᵗᵉʳ ᵇᵉⁱⁿᵍ ˢⁿᵃᵖᵖᵉᵈ ᵃᵗ ʰⁱᵐˢᵉˡᶠ ʲᵘˢᵗ ʰᵃᵈ ʰⁱᵐ ʳᵉᵃˡⁱˢᵉ ʷʰᵃᵗ ˢᵖᵒⁿᵍᵉᵇᵒᵇ ᵐᵘˢᵗ'ᵛᵉ ᶠᵉˡᵗ‧ ᔆᑫᵘⁱᵈʷᵃʳᵈ ʷᵃˢ ᵐᵃᵏⁱⁿᵍ ˢᵒᵐᵉ ᶠᵘⁿⁿʸ ᶠᵃᶜᵉˢ ᵗᵒ ˡⁱᵍʰᵗᵉⁿ ᔆᵖᵒⁿᵍᵉᴮᵒᵇ'ˢ ᵐᵒᵒᵈ⸴ ˢᵖᵒⁿᵍᵉᵇᵒᵇ ᵇᵘʳˢᵗⁱⁿᵍ ᵒᵘᵗ ⁱⁿᵗᵒ ˡᵃᵘᵍʰᵗᵉʳ‧ ᴱᵛᵉⁿ ˢᑫᵘⁱᵈʷᵃʳᵈ ʰⁱᵐˢᵉˡᶠ ˢᵗᵃʳᵗᵉᵈ ᵗᵒ ˡᵃᵘᵍʰ ʳⁱᵍʰᵗ ᵃˡᵒⁿᵍ ʷⁱᵗʰ ʰⁱᵐ‧ ᴾˡᵃⁿᵏᵗᵒⁿ ᶜᵒᵘˡᵈⁿ'ᵗ ʰᵒˡᵈ ᵇᵃᶜᵏ ᵃˡˡ ᵗʰᵉ ᵗᵉᵃʳˢ ᵃⁿʸ ˡᵒⁿᵍᵉʳ⸴ ᔆᵉᵉⁱⁿᵍ ˢᑫᵘⁱᵈʷᵃʳᵈ ᵃⁿᵈ ˢᵖᵒⁿᵍᵉ ᵇᵒᵇ ᵃᵇˡᵉ ᵗᵒ ᵇᵉ ᶠʳⁱᵉⁿᵈˢ‧ "ᴵ ᵐᵉᵃⁿ⸴ ʷʰᵃᵗ ᵈᵒ ʸᵒᵘ ʷᵃⁿᵗ ᵘˢ ᵗᵒ ᵈᵒ ᴾˡᵃⁿᵏᵗᵒⁿ; ʲᵘˢᵗ ˢⁱᵗ ᵃʳᵒᵘⁿᵈ ᵃⁿᵈ ᶠᵉᵉˡ ˢᵒʳʳʸ ᶠᵒʳ ʸᵒᵘ‽ ᴵᵗ'ˢ ᵃˡˡ ʸᵒᵘ ˢᵉᵉᵐ ʸᵒᵘ ʷᵃⁿᵗ ᵘˢ ᵗᵒ ᵈᵒ‧‧‧" ᔆᑫᵘⁱᵈʷᵃʳᵈ ˡᵉᶠᵗ ᵗᵒ ᵍᵒ ᵘᵖˢᵗᵃⁱʳˢ ˡᵉᵃᵛⁱⁿᵍ ᔆᵖᵒⁿᵍᵉᵇᵒᵇ ʷⁱᵗʰ ᴾˡᵃⁿᵏᵗᵒⁿ ʷʰᵒ ⁱˢ ᵐᵒʳᵉ ᵘᵖˢᵉᵗ‧ "ᴾˡᵃⁿᵏᵗᵒⁿ ᴵ ᵗᵒᵗᵃˡˡʸ ᵘⁿᵈᵉʳˢᵗᵃⁿᵈ; ʸᵒᵘ'ʳᵉ ᵒᵇᵛⁱᵒᵘˢˡʸ ˢᵗʳᵉˢˢᵉᵈ ᵒᵘᵗ⸴ ᵃⁿᵈ ʷʰᵃᵗ ᔆᑫᵘⁱᵈʷᵃʳᵈ ˢᵃⁱᵈ ᵗᵒ ʸᵒᵘ'ˢ ᶜᵒᵐᵖˡᵉᵗᵉˡʸ ᵘⁿᶜᵃˡˡᵉᵈ ᶠᵒʳ! ᴮᵉˢⁱᵈᵉˢ⸴ ᴵ ˡⁱᵏᵉ ˢᵖᵉⁿᵈⁱⁿᵍ ᵗⁱᵐᵉ ʷⁱᵗʰ ʸᵒᵘ! ᴮᵉᶜᵃᵘˢᵉ ⁱᵗ'ˢ ʷʰᵃᵗ ᶠʳⁱᵉⁿᵈˢ ᵈᵒ!" ᴾˡᵃⁿᵏᵗᵒⁿ ᵍᵃˢᵖᵉᵈ⸴ ᵐᵒʳᵉ ᵗᵉᵃʳˢ ᶜᵒᵐⁱⁿᵍ ᵗᵒ‧ "ᴵ'ᵐ ᵍᵒⁱⁿᵍ ᵗᵒ ᵍᵒ ᵗᵃˡᵏ ᵗᵒ ˢᑫᵘⁱᵈʷᵃʳᵈ‧‧‧" ᔆᵖᵒⁿᵍᵉᵇᵒᵇ ˡᵉᶠᵗ‧ ᵁˢⁱⁿᵍ ʷʰᵃᵗᵉᵛᵉʳ ᵃʳᵐ ˢᵗʳᵉⁿᵍᵗʰ ʰᵉ ᶜᵒᵘˡᵈ ᵐᵘˢᵗᵉʳ⸴ ᴾˡᵃⁿᵏᵗᵒⁿ ᵈʳᵃᵍˢ ʰⁱᵐˢᵉˡᶠ ᵖᵃⁱⁿᶠᵘˡˡʸ ˢˡᵒʷ ᵗᵒ ᵉᵃᵛᵉˢᵈʳᵒᵖ‧ "ʸᵒᵘ ᶠʳᵃᵗᵉʳⁿⁱˢⁱⁿᵍ ʷⁱᵗʰ ᵃⁿ ᵉⁿᵉᵐʸ ʰᵉ ᵃˡˢᵒ ᵈᵒᵉˢⁿ'ᵗ ᵇᵉˡᵒⁿᵍ‧‧‧" "ᴾˡᵃⁿᵏᵗᵒⁿ'ˢ ʰᵘʳᵗⁱⁿᵍ ᵃⁿᵈ ᴵ'ᵐ ʰⁱˢ ᶠʳⁱᵉⁿᵈ‧‧‧" "ᔆᵖᵒⁿᵍᵉᵇᵒᵇ⸴ ᵗᵉˡˡ ᵐᵉ ᵒⁿᵉ ᵗⁱᵐᵉ ʰᵉ'ˢ ᵇᵉᵉⁿ ᵃ ᶠʳⁱᵉⁿᵈ ᵗᵒ ʸᵒᵘ; ʸᵒᵘ ᶜᵃⁿⁿᵒᵗ⸴ ᶜᵃⁿ ʸᵒᵘ‧ ᴾˡᵃⁿᵏᵗᵒⁿ ʰᵃˢ ⁿᵉᵛᵉʳ ᶜᵃʳᵉᵈ ᶠᵒʳ ʸᵒᵘ ˢᵖᵒⁿᵍᵉᵇᵒᵇ⸴ ʲᵘˢᵗ ʰⁱᵐˢᵉˡᶠ!" ᴾˡᵃⁿᵏᵗᵒⁿ ᵇᵃᶜᵏᵉᵈ ᵃʷᵃʸ ʰᵉᵃʳⁱⁿᵍ ˢᑫᵘⁱᵈʷᵃʳᵈ ᶠᵃⁱˡⁱⁿᵍ ᵗᵒ ˢᵉᵉ ᵗʰᵉ ˢᵗᵉᵖˢ; ʰᵉ ˢˡⁱᵖᵖᵉᵈ ᵒⁿᶜᵉ ᵃᵍᵃⁱⁿ⸴ ʰᵘʳᵗⁱⁿᵍ ʰⁱˢ ⁱⁿʲᵘʳᵉᵈ ˡᵉᵍ ᵐᵒʳᵉ‧ ᴮᵒᵗʰ ˢᑫᵘⁱᵈʷᵃʳᵈ ᵃⁿᵈ ˢᵖᵒⁿᵍᵉᵇᵒᵇ ʰᵉᵃʳᵈ ᵗᵒᵖᵖˡⁱⁿᵍ ⁿᵒⁱˢᵉˢ ᵍᵒ ᵈᵒʷⁿ ᵗʰᵉ ˢᵗᵃⁱʳᶜᵃˢᵉ‧ ᴾˡᵃⁿᵏᵗᵒⁿ ʷᵃˢ ˢᵗⁱˡˡ ᵉˣᶜᵉᵖᵗ ᶠᵒʳ ˢᵒᵐᵉ ᵗʷⁱᵗᶜʰⁱⁿᵍ‧ ᶠᵒˡˡᵒʷⁱⁿᵍ ᔆᑫᵘⁱᵈʷᵃʳᵈ'ˢ ᵍᵃᶻᵉ ᔆᵖᵒⁿᵍᵉᵇᵒᵇ ˢᵃʷ ʰᵒʷ ᴾˡᵃⁿᵏᵗᵒⁿ'ˢ ⁿᵒᵗ ᵉᵛᵉⁿ ˡᵒᵒᵏⁱⁿᵍ ᵘᵖ‧ ᴴⁱˢ ˡᵉᵍ ᵇˡᵉᵈ‧ ᔆᑫᵘⁱᵈʷᵃʳᵈ ʰᵘʳʳⁱᵉᵈˡʸ ʳᵃⁿ‧ ᔆᵖᵒⁿᵍᵉ ᵇᵒᵇ ᵗᵒᵒᵏ ᵒᶠᶠ ᵗʰᵉ ᵇᵃⁿᵈᵃᵍᵉˢ ᵃⁿᵈ ᵗʳⁱᵉᵈ ᵗᵒ ᵏᵉᵉᵖ ʰⁱˢ ᶜᵒᵐᵖᵒˢᵘʳᵉ⸴ ˢᵉᵉⁱⁿᵍ ʰᵒʷ ᵇʳᵘⁱˢᵉᵈ ⁱᵗ ˡᵒᵒᵏᵉᵈ‧ "ᴾˡᵃⁿᵏᵗᵒⁿ⸴ ᵃⁿˢʷᵉʳ ᵐᵉ‧‧‧" ᴾˡᵃⁿᵏᵗᵒⁿ'ˢ ᶜᵒᵐᵖˡᵉᵗᵉˡʸ ˢᵘʳʳᵒᵘⁿᵈᵉᵈ ᵇʸ ᵖᵃⁱⁿ ᵖᵒᵘⁿᵈⁱⁿᵍ ᶠʳᵒᵐ ʰⁱˢ ʰᵘʳᵗ ˡᵉᵍ‧ ᴱᵛᵉʳʸ ᵗʰⁱⁿᵍ ᵉⁿᵛᵉˡᵒᵖᵉᵈ ʰⁱᵐ ᵃˢ ˢᑫᵘⁱᵈʷᵃʳᵈ ᶜᵃᵐᵉ ʷⁱᵗʰ ᵗʰᵉ ᶠⁱʳˢᵗ ᵃⁱᵈ‧ "ᔆᑫᵘⁱᵈʷᵃʳᵈ ᵖˡᵉᵃˢᵉ ᵇᵉ ᵍᵉⁿᵗˡᵉ!" ᶜʳⁱᵉᵈ ˢᵖᵒⁿᵍᵉᵇᵒᵇ‧ "ᴳᵉᵗ ᵐᵉ ˢᵒᵐᵉ ⁱᶜᵉ ᵃⁿᵈ ᵃ ʷᵃˢʰᶜˡᵒᵗʰ; ʰᵘʳʳʸ!" ᔆᑫᵘⁱᵈʷᵃʳᵈ ʸᵉˡˡˢ‧ ᔆᑫᵘⁱᵈʷᵃʳᵈ ᶠᵉˡᵗ ᵍᵘⁱˡᵗʸ ᵃⁿᵈ ˢᶜᵃʳᵉᵈ ᶠᵒʳ ᵉᵛᵉʳʸ ᵗʰⁱⁿᵍ⸴ ʷᵒʳʳʸⁱⁿᵍ ᵃᵇᵒᵘᵗ ᴾˡᵃⁿᵏᵗᵒⁿ ᵃⁿᵈ ʰᵒʷ ᵇᵃᵈˡʸ ʰᵉ ᵗʳᵉᵃᵗᵉᵈ ʰⁱᵐ‧ ᴴᵉ ᵗʳⁱᵉᵈ ᵗᵒ ᵗᵃᵏᵉ ⁱᵗ ᵉᵃˢʸ ᵃˢ ᴾˡᵃⁿᵏᵗᵒⁿ ʷⁱⁿᶜᵉᵈ ⁱⁿ ʰⁱˢ ⁱⁿˢᵉⁿˢⁱᵇˡᵉ ˢᵗᵃᵗᵉ‧ ᴬᶠᵗᵉʳ ᶜᵒᵐᵖˡᵉᵗᵉˡʸ ᵈʳᵉˢˢⁱⁿᵍ ᵗʰᵉ ʷᵒᵘⁿᵈᵉᵈ ˡᵉᵍ ᵃⁿᵈ ᵖᵘᵗᵗⁱⁿᵍ ᵗʰᵉ ᶠⁱʳˢᵗ ᵃⁱᵈ ᵏⁱᵗ ᵇᵃᶜᵏ⸴ ˢᑫᵘⁱᵈʷᵃʳᵈ ˢᵃᵗ ᵈᵒʷⁿ ᵃⁿᵈ ˢⁱᵍʰᵉᵈ‧ ᴾˡᵃⁿᵏᵗᵒⁿ ᵍʳᵃᵈᵘᵃˡˡʸ ᵇᵉᶜᵃᵐᵉ ᵐᵒʳᵉ ᵃʳᵒᵘˢᵃᵇˡᵉ/ʳᵉˢᵖᵒⁿˢⁱᵛᵉ ᵃˢ ᵗʰᵉ ᵖᵃⁱⁿ ᵈʷⁱⁿᵈˡᵉᵈ ᵗʰᵃⁿᵏˢ ᵗᵒ ˢᑫᵘⁱᵈʷᵃʳᵈ‧ "ᴴᵘʰ‧‧‧" ᴾˡᵃⁿᵏᵗᵒⁿ ᵒᵖᵉⁿᵉᵈ ʰⁱˢ ᵉʸᵉ‧ "ᴵ ʷᵃⁿᵗ ʸᵒᵘ ᵗᵒ ᶠᵉᵉˡ ᵇᵉᵗᵗᵉʳ‧" ᔆᑫᵘⁱᵈʷᵃʳᵈ ᵗᵒˡᵈ ᴾˡᵃⁿᵏᵗᵒⁿ ʷʰᵒ'ˢ ˢᵒᵐᵉʷʰᵃᵗ ᵈᵃᶻᵉᵈ‧ ᔆᑫᵘⁱᵈʷᵃʳᵈ⸴ ʷʰᵒ ᵖʳᵃᶜᵗⁱˢᵉᵈ ᵃⁿᵈ ᵖᵉʳᶠᵉᶜᵗᵉᵈ ᵗʰᵉ ᶜˡᵃʳⁱⁿᵉᵗ⸴ ᵖˡᵃʸᵉᵈ ᴾˡᵃⁿᵏᵗᵒⁿ ᵃ ⁿⁱᶜᵉ ˢᵒⁿᵍ‧ ᵀʰᵉ ᶜᵃˡᵐⁱⁿᵍ ᵐᵉˡᵒᵈʸ ᵃˡᵒⁿᵍ ʷⁱᵗʰ ᶠᵉᵉˡⁱⁿᵍ ᵈʳᵒʷˢʸ ʳᵉˡᵃˣᵉᵈ ᴾˡᵃⁿᵏᵗᵒⁿ ᵉⁿᵒᵘᵍʰ ᵗᵒ ʳᵉⁿᵈᵉʳ ʰⁱᵐ ˢˡᵉᵉᵖʸ‧ ᔆᵘʳᵉ ᵉⁿᵒᵘᵍʰ ᶜˡᵒˢⁱⁿᵍ ʰⁱˢ ᵉʸᵉ ʰᵉ ᶠᵉˡˡ ᶠᵃˢᵗ ᵃˢˡᵉᵉᵖ ᵒⁿ ˢᑫᵘⁱᵈʷᵃʳᵈ ᵃˢ ʰⁱˢ ʰᵉᵃᵈ ˡᵉᵃⁿⁱⁿᵍ ᵇᵃᶜᵏ ᵃᵍᵃⁱⁿˢᵗ ᔆᑫᵘⁱᵈʷᵃʳᵈ ˢᵗⁱˡˡ ᵖˡᵃʸⁱⁿᵍ ᵗʰᵉ ᶜˡᵃʳⁱⁿᵉᵗ‧ "ᔆᵉᵉᵐˢ ˡⁱᵏᵉ ʰᵉ ᶜᵒᵘˡᵈⁿ'ᵗ ˢᵗᵃʸ ᵘᵖ ᵃⁿʸ ˡᵒⁿᵍᵉʳ‧‧‧" ᔆᵖᵒⁿᵍᵉᵇᵒᵇ ˢᵃⁱᵈ ˢᵉᵉⁱⁿᵍ ʰⁱᵐ ᶠᵃˡˡ ᵃˢˡᵉᵉᵖ‧ ᴬᶠᵗᵉʳ ᵃ ˡᵒⁿᵍ ᵗⁱᵐᵉ⸴ ᴾˡᵃⁿᵏᵗᵒⁿ ᵇᵉᵍⁱⁿˢ ᵗᵒ ˢᵗⁱʳ ᶠʳᵒᵐ ʰⁱˢ ᵘⁿⁱⁿᵗᵉⁿᵗⁱᵒⁿᵃˡ ⁿᵃᵖ‧ ᶠᵉᵉˡⁱⁿᵍ ᵃʷᵏʷᵃʳᵈ⸴ ʰᵉ ˡᵒᵒᵏᵉᵈ ᵗᵒ ˢᵉᵉ ˢᑫᵘⁱᵈʷᵃʳᵈ ʷᵃᵗᶜʰ ˢᵖᵒⁿᵍᵉᵇᵒᵇ ᵈᵒ ˢᵒᵐᵉᵗʰⁱⁿᵍ ʷⁱᵗʰ ᵖˡᵃʸⁱⁿᵍ ᶜᵃʳᵈˢ‧ "ᴼʰ ʰᵉʸ ᴾˡᵃⁿᵏᵗᵒⁿ!" "ᔆᵖᵒⁿᵍᵉ ᵇᵒᵇ'ˢ ˢʰᵒʷⁱⁿᵍ ᵐᵉ ˢᵒᵐᵉ ᶜᵃʳᵈ ᵗʳⁱᶜᵏˢ‧‧‧" ᔆᑫᵘⁱᵈʷᵃʳᵈ ᵗᵒˡᵈ ʰⁱᵐ‧ "ʸᵒᵘ ᵏⁿᵒʷ ᵃⁿʸ?" ᴾˡᵃⁿᵏᵗᵒⁿ ˢʰᵒᵒᵏ ʰⁱˢ ʰᵉᵃᵈ⸴ ˢᵗⁱˡˡ ᶠᵉᵉˡⁱⁿᵍ ᵗʰᵉ ᵍʳᵒᵍᵍʸ ˢᵗᵃᵗᵉ‧ "ᴴᵒʷ'ˢ ʸᵒᵘʳ ˡᵉᵍ⸴ ᵒʳ ᵈᵒ ʸᵒᵘ ⁿᵒᵗ ʷᵃⁿⁿᵃ ᵗᵃˡᵏ ᵃᵇᵒᵘᵗ ⁱᵗ‧‧‧" "ᴵ ˢᵗⁱˡˡ ᶠᵉᵉˡ ᵃ ᵇⁱᵗ ˢᵒʳᵉ⸴ ⁿᵒᵗ ᵃˢ ⁱⁿᵗᵉⁿˢᵉ‧‧‧" "ᴴᵉʸ⸴ ᔆᑫᵘⁱᵈʷᵃʳᵈ ᵈᵉᵃˡ ᵘˢ ᵉᵃᶜʰ ᵃ ᵈᵉᶜᵏ!" ᔆʰᵘᶠᶠˡⁱⁿᵍ ᵗʰᵉ ᶜᵃʳᵈˢ⸴ ᵗʰᵉʸ ᵖˡᵃʸᵉᵈ ᵃˢ ᶠʳⁱᵉⁿᵈˢ ˢʰᵒᵘˡᵈ ᵈᵒ‧
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Uhm important things ˚₊꒷୭୧ Hii, looking for a discord server to join? You should join us! join.... SLUMBERING MOON ‼️ ୧ ‧₊˚ 🌙 ⋅ (alzo srry that we keep advertising this server, were desperate for members and idk why) [https://discord.gg/Hj2BW6NpqN] We are a sfw, social, crk themed server :3 Our offers are.... - Daily wot and qotd - A nice and loving community - Fun events ( Ex : Gartic phone , roblox , etc.) - Lots of bots to not make u bored - Lastly... A large server layout with fun things u can do ! NOTE : our servers a bit dead..
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