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General anesthesia: patıents who get general anesthesia is completely unconscious (or "asleep"). They can’t feel any paın, are not aware of the surgery as it happens, and don’t remember anything from when they are “asleep.” Patients can get general anesthesia through an IV (into a vein) or inhale it through their nose and mouth. With general anesthesia, you're typically given a combination of medications through a mask or intravenous (IV) needle. This will render you temporarily unconscious. The combination of medications used to put patients to “sleep” before surgery or another medical procedure is called general anesthesia. Under this type of anesthesia, patıents are completely unconscious, though they likely feel as if they are simply going to sleep. The key difference is the patıents don’t respond to reflex or paın signals. Regional anesthesia: This type of anesthesia may be injected near a cluster of nerves in the spine. This makes a large area of the bødy numb and unable to feel paın. Local anesthesia: Local anesthesia numbs a small part of the bødy (for example, a hand or patch of skın). It can be given as a shot, spray, or ointment. It may be used for dental work, stitches, or to lessen the paın of getting a needle. General and regional anesthesia are used in hospitals and surgery centers. These medicines are given to patients by specially trained doctors (anesthesiologists) or nurses (nurse anesthetists). Health care providers can give patients local anesthesia in doctors’ offices and clinics. Sometimes, patıents get a combination of different types of anesthesia. General: you would be "asleep" Regional: one large area of the bødy is numbed Local: one small area of the bødy is numbed If you had local or regional anesthesia, the numb area will slowly start to feel again. You then may feel some discomfort in the area. Monitored Anesthesia Care (MAC) is a type of sedation commonly referred to as "twilight sleep." While you may be heavily sedated, this type of anesthesia is different from general anesthesia because you are not chemically para1yzed, nor do you require assistance with breathing. Still, your vital signs are closely monitored to make sure you're stable throughout the procedure. This type of anesthesia wears off in as little as 10 minutes. Depending on the medications used and the doses given, you may or may not remember the procedure. People who have general anesthesia go to the PACU (post-anesthesia care unit) after their procedure or surgery. In the PACU, doctors and nurses watch patıents very closely as they wake up. Some people feel irritable, or confused when waking up. They may have a dry throat from breathing tubes. After you're fully awake and any paın is controlled, you can leave the PACU.
Feb 21, 2014 03:55 PM Anesthesia has been referred to as a reversible coma. When coming out of anesthesia in recovery, most people experience a profound sense of confusion and disorientation. It takes a while for the brain to actually wake up, even after you are conscious. Most people don't remember much after the pre-op sedative has been given. You may need a type of anesthesia where you lose consciousness. You can experience confusion as you “wake up” after the procedure with this type of anesthesia. It holds several different purposes depending on the procedure — sometimes to relieve pain, to “knock” you unconscious or to induce amnesia so you have no memory or feeling of a medical procedure. General anesthesia knocks you out completely, while local anesthesia is only applied to certain body parts or patches of skin. General anesthesia involves going into a coma-like state. It’s like being asleep. You will not be aware of what’s happening around you or feel pain. You will receive this type through an IV or mask. The surgeon will monitor you throughout the procedure and adjust medications as needed so you don’t wake up. It’s likely you’ll have no memory of the procedure. The anesthesia used to put you into an unconscious state can take some time to wear off, even as you become more awake after the procedure. You may experience: drowsiness confusion weakness uncoordinated movements lack of control of what you say blurry vision memory problems These side effects should be temporary. It may take 1 to 2 days to fully regain all your thinking abilities. In some cases, you can experience postoperative delirium. This can cause you to feel “out of it” for a longer period of time. Conscious sedation and general anesthesia can affect your short-term memory. You may not remember anything you say or do during the procedure or immediately after it.
Baby Moses law for abandoning newborns In Texas, if you have a newborn that you're unable to ca̢re for, you can bring your baby to a designated safe place with no questions asked. The Safe Haven law, also known as the Baby Moses law, gives parents who are unable to ca̢re for their child a safe and legal chøice to leαve their infant with an employee at a designated safe place—a hospıtal, fire station, free-standing emergency centers or emergency medical services (EMS) station. Then, your baby will receive medical ca̢re and be placed with an emergency provider. Information for Parents If you're thinking about bringing your baby to a designated Safe Haven, please read the information below: Your baby must be 60 days old or younger and unhἀrmed and safe. You may take your baby to any hospıtal, fire station, or emergency medical services (EMS) station in Texas. You need to give your baby to an employee who works at one of these safe places and tell this person that you want to leαve your baby at a Safe Haven. You may be asked by an employee for famıly or medical history to make sure that your baby receives the ca̢re they need. If you leαve your baby at a fire or EMS station, your baby may be taken to a hospıtal to receive any medical attention they need. Remember, If you leave your unhἀrmed infant at a Safe Haven, you will not be prosecuted for abandonment or neglect.
Autism and Anxiety AUTISM Medical Visits and Autism: A Better Way Strategies to reduce anxiety during doctor visits. Posted April 6, 2019 Going for a medical visit can be a scary proposition for any child. A child on the autism spectrum has to cope with all of the usual fears associated with seeing a doctor. However, for the autistic child, there are a host of other factors that can make seeing the doctor not only unpleasant, but also downright terrifying. Some of these factors are: Waiting Waiting is unpleasant and difficult for most children to do. However, for the autistic child, waiting can result in very high distress. Children on the spectrum may struggle with the concept of time, and thus may not find comfort in being told that they will be seen in X number of minutes. Waits at the doctor's office also tend to be unpredictable, and this unpredictability often creates high anxiety for autistic kids. Abrupt Transitions Doctor's offices are busy places. When it is time to move from one part of the visit to another, there is often pressure to do it quickly, without advance notice. These types of abrupt transitions can be very unsettling for the child on the autism spectrum. Sensory Sensitivities Doctor's offices are not very sensory-friendly places: bright lighting, unfamiliar sounds, unpleasant smells, and multiple intrusions on the tactile senses (e.g., blood pressure cuff, feel of stethoscope) can be very difficult for an autistic child to process and cope with. Language Processing Being asked multiple questions—often at a quick pace—can quickly overwhelm the language-processing capacity of a child on the spectrum. The use of abstract language and unfamiliar medical terms can further contribute to anxiety. The Consequences of Health Care Anxiety Health care-related anxiety can have serious consequences. The child on the spectrum may be distressed not only during the visit, but for days (or even weeks) before. Challenging behaviors during the visit (due to anxiety, not intentional) can prevent health care providers from conducting a thorough evaluation, and may make it difficult for parents to ask questions or to express their concerns. A Better Way Fortunately, there are a number of strategies that parents and health care providers can use to substantially reduce the anxiety associated with medical visits. Ideally, parents and providers should work together in developing a plan that will target each individual child's needs. These strategies include: Bring comfort items. A favorite toy or stuffed animal can help to reduce anxiety during procedures. Use distraction. Distraction can divert attention away from fear-filled procedures. Distractions can be physical items (such as toys or video games) or the use of a familiar person that the child feels comfortable with. Do a "dry run." Visit the office and meet the staff before the first official appointment. Use clear language. Health care providers should use concrete terms and a conversational pace that is manageable. Bring communication systems. Ensure that communication systems include words and phrases which may be used during an appointment. Use a visually supported schedule. This can help the child to understand what will occur next during a visit. Use familiar staff. Ensure that staff the child feels comfortable with are available on the day of the appointment. Get paperwork done ahead of time. Office staff should send forms and other paperwork home for completion ahead of time to avoid unnecessary waiting. Address sensory sensitivities. Health care providers and office staff should address all sensory aspects of the visit and minimize unnecessary noise, smells, and other forms of stimulation. Summary Health care visits can be really scary for kids on the autism spectrum, but it doesn't have to be this way. With some minor accommodations, health care visits can become a much more tolerable experience for autistic children and their families Christopher Lynch, Ph.D., is a psychologist who specializes in stress and anxiety management for children with autism. He is the Director of the Pediatric Behavioral Medicine Department at Goryeb Children's Hospital.
givesmehope: I met a 16 year old genius who was in medical school, studying to be a pediatric neurosurgeon. He put every dollar he made at his job into a retirement fund. Why? He wanted to be able to retire at age 30, so that he could spend the rest of his life performing brain surgeries for free. His philanthropy GMH. Mar 5 2010
😷 https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/autism-and-anxiety/201904/medical-visits-and-autism-better-way 😷
https://www.ba-bamail.com/health/general-health-tips/using-these-25-medical-terms-will-impress-your-doctor/
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Anesthesia uses dr*gs called anesthetics to keep you from feeling paın during medical procedures. Local and regional anesthesia numbs a specific area of your bødy. General anesthesia makes you temporarily unconscious (fall asleep) so you can have more invasive surgeries. Sedation: Also called “twilight sleep,” sedation relaxes you to the point where you’ll nap but can wake up if needed to communicate. General anesthesia: This treatment makes you unconscious and insensitive to paın or other stimuli, and will put the patient to sleep during the procedure so that you are asleep during the surgery. This type of anesthesia puts you into a deep sleep and you won’t be aware of or feel anything during the surgery. Once the procedure is over, the anesthesia will wear off and you’ll gradually wake up. They will not feel any paın or discomfort during the procedure and will not remember anything afterwards. Most people experience some level of loopiness after because the surgery involves anesthesia, which can cause side effects like dizziness and confusion. Source https://webdmd.org/what-kind-of-anesthesia-is-used-for-wisdom-teeth-removal/

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These levels of sedation under anesthesia are defined by the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) and are crucial in determining the appropriate level of sedation for each patient and procedure, ensuring patient safety and comfort throughout the perioperative period. Minimal Sedation: Also known as anxiolysis, minimal sedation involves a drug-induced state during which patients respond normally to verbal commands. Their cognitive function and physical coordination remain unaffected, and there is no compromise in airway reflexes or protective reflexes. This level of sedation is commonly used for procedures requiring minimal discomfort or anxiety relief, such as minor dental procedures or diagnostic tests. Moderate Sedation/Conscious Sedation: Moderate sedation, also referred to as conscious sedation, induces a drug-induced depression of consciousness, during which patients respond purposefully to verbal or light tactile stimulation. While maintaining spontaneous ventilation, patients may experience decreased anxiety and may have impaired cognitive function and physical coordination. However, they retain the ability to maintain their own airway and respond to commands. This level of sedation is commonly used for procedures such as endoscopic examinations, minor surgeries, or interventional radiology procedures. Deep Sedation: Deep sedation involves a drug-induced depression of consciousness, during which patients may not respond purposefully to verbal or tactile stimulation. Patients under deep sedation may require assistance in maintaining their airway, and spontaneous ventilation may be inadequate. However, patients still maintain cardiovascular function. This level of sedation is often used for procedures requiring significant analgesia and amnesia, such as major surgical procedures or certain diagnostic imaging studies. General Anesthesia: General anesthesia involves a drug-induced state during which patients are unarousable, even in the presence of painful stimulation. Patients under general anesthesia require assistance in maintaining their airway and ventilation, and cardiovascular function may be impaired. General anesthesia is characterized by a complete loss of consciousness and protective reflexes, allowing for surgical procedures to be performed without pain or awareness. This level of sedation is utilized for major surgical procedures or invasive diagnostic procedures where unconsciousness and muscle relaxation are necessary. Procedural sedation and analgesia (PSA) is a technique in which a sedating/dissociative medication is given, usually along with an analgesic medication, in order to perform non-surgical procedures on a patient. The overall goal is to induce a decreased level of consciousness while maintaining the patient's ability to breathe on their own. Airway protective reflexes are not compromised by this process
Sedation: Who Provides Anesthesia? Several types of medical professionals are able to provide anesthesia, including: Physicians (anesthesiologists) Nurse anesthetists Dentists/oral surgeons Anesthesiologist assistants The level of training varies between different types of providers, with anesthesiologists having the highest level. If you are receiving nitrous oxide (laughing gas), you will be fitted with a small mask inhale the anesthesia. If intravenous (IV) sedation is used, a needle is placed in the vein to administer the sedative. Regional Anesthesia Regional anesthesia is provided by injecting specific sites with a numbing medication. This may be done with a needle or via a flexible catheter line through which anesthetics and other medications can be administered as needed. With this type of anesthesia, only the body part being operated on is numbed, which means you are awake—that is, sedated, but still conscious—during the procedure. The anesthetic works on the nerves, causing numbness below the injection site. You are monitored throughout your procedure. Your anesthesia provider will continuously monitor your vital signs, including heart rate, blood pressure, and breathing, during your procedure. Local Anesthesia This type of anesthesia is typically used to numb a small site for minor procedures ,a numbing medication is either applied to the skin as a cream or spray, or injected into the area where the procedure will be performed. Monitored Anesthesia Care (MAC) This is a type of sedation commonly referred to as "twilight sleep." It's usually used for outpatient procedures to make you feel sleepy and relaxed. While you may be heavily sedated, this type of anesthesia is different from general anesthesia because you are not chemically paralyzed, nor do you require assistance with breathing. Still, your vital signs are closely monitored to make sure you're stable throughout the procedure. This type of anesthesia wears off in as little as 10 minutes. Depending on the medications used and the doses given, you may or may not remember the procedure. When the surgery is done, other medications can be used to reverse the effect of the anesthesia. You will also be monitored in this recovery phase. After the procedure is complete, the nitrous oxide gas or IV drip is stopped, and you'll be brought slowly out of sedation. They control the level in your body by increasing, decreasing, or eventually stopping the infusion, which wakes you up.
Specific Types and Classes Multiple types are available. Some allow you to be alert and oriented during a medical procedure, while others make sleep so you're unaware of what's going on. It essentially puts you into a medically induced coma. This type of anesthesia not only allows a person to undergo a procedure without pain but also allows the person to be unconscious for the procedure. Some specific types or classes of general anesthesia include: IV anesthetics sedatives- your anesthesiologist will use your IV line to administer into your blood. The medication works quickly and typically puts you to sleep in under a minute. For this reason, its effects can be stopped by stopping the infusion, which will wake you up from it in minutes. Inhalational anesthetics The four clinical stages of general anesthesia include induction, maintenance, emergence, and recovery. Induction can be achieved through administration of either an intravenous or inhalation anesthetic. During the maintenance stage, anesthetic agents, intravenous, inhalation, or a combination, are continued to maintain the surgical stage of anesthesia. The emergence phase correlates to the discontinuation of anesthetic agents with the goal attaining near baseline functionality. Organ systems of focus include the cardiovascular, respiratory, and central nervous systems (CNS). Throughout the procedure, the anesthesiologist will monitor your vital signs, including your heart rate and rhythm, blood pressure, temperature, and body fluid balance, to ensure safety and comfort. The recovery phase is an extension of the emergence stage whereby the goal is to return the patient back to their baseline state of physiological function. While most people will start to regain consciousness within a few minutes, it can take several hours to feel completely alert and coherent again. Patients experiencing delirium or agitation when coming out of anesthesia can also feel hyperactive or experience extreme sluggishness. The researchers believe hyperactivity may result from the microglia intervening too much between the neuron and inhibitory synapses.
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local anesthesia (you're awake and may feel pressure but shouldn't feel pain), sedation (you're awake but with lessened consciousness and won't remember much) or general anesthesia (you're completely knocked out and won't remember jack)
These may include nitrous oxide (laughing gas) inhaled, an intravenous (IV) line in, oral medications like Valium or Halcion (for anxiety) or a combination, along with anesthesia to numb the pain. Regardless of which type of anesthesia you’re given, you should feel relaxed and pain-free, with limited to no memory of the procedure. If you’re given general anesthesia, you’ll lose consciousness altogether. A surgical team will closely monitor your pulse, respiration, blood pressure, and fluids.
Three broad categories of anesthesia exist: General anesthesia suppresses central nervous system activity and results in unconsciousness and total lack of sensation, using either injected or inhaled dr*gs. General anesthesia (as opposed to sedation or regional anesthesia) has three main goals: lack of movement (paralƴsıs), unconsciousness, and blunting of the stress response. Sedation suppresses the central nervous system to a lesser degree, inhibiting both anxıety and creation of long-term memories without resulting in unconsciousness. Sedation (also referred to as dissociative anesthesia or twilight anesthesia) creates hypnotic, sedative, anxiolytic, amnesic, anticonvulsant, and centrally produced muscle-relaxing properties. From the perspective of the person giving the sedation, the patıents appear sleepy, relaxed and forgetful, allowing unpleasant procedures to be more easily completed. From the perspective of the subject receiving a sedative, the effect is a feeling of general relaxation, amnesia (loss of memory) and time pass1ng quickly. Regional and local anesthesia block transmission of nerve impulses from a specific part of the bødy. Depending on the situation, this may be used either on it's own (in which case the individual remains fully conscious), or in combination with general anesthesia or sedation. When paın is blocked from a part of the bødy using local anesthetics, it is generally referred to as regional anesthesia. There are many types of regional anesthesia either by ınjectıons into the tissue itself, a vein that feeds the area or around a nerve trunk that supplies sensation to the area. The latter are called nerve blocks and are divided into peripheral or central nerve blocks. Local anesthesia is simple infiltration by the clinician directly onto the region of interest (e.g. numbing a tooth for dental work). Peripheral nerve blocks use dr*gs targeted at peripheral nerves to anesthetize an isolated part of the bødy, such as an entire limb. Neuraxial blockade, mainly epidural and spinal anesthesia, can be performed in the region of the central nervous system itself, suppressing all incoming sensation from nerves supplying the area of the block. Most general anaesthetics are ınduced either intravenously or by inhalation. Anaesthetic agents may be administered by various routes, including inhalation, ınjectıons (intravenously, intramuscular, or subcutaneous) Agent concentration measurement: anaesthetic machines typically have monitors to measure the percentage of inhalational anaesthetic agents used as well as exhalation concentrations. In order to prolong unconsciousness for the duration of surgery, anaesthesia must be maintained. Electroencephalography, entropy monitoring, or other systems may be used to verify the depth of anaesthesia. At the end of surgery, administration of anaesthetic agents is discontinued. Recovery of consciousness occurs when the concentration of anaesthetic in the braın drops below a certain level (this occurs usually within 1 to 30 minutes, mostly depending on the duration of surgery) The duration of action of intravenous induction agents is generally 5 to 10 minutes, after which spontaneous recovery of consciousness will occur. Emergence is the return to baseline physiologic function of all organ systems after the cessation of general anaesthetics. This stage may be accompanied by temporary neurologic phenomena, such as agitated emergence (acute mental confusion), aphasia (impaired production or comprehension of speech), or focal impairment in sensory or motor function.
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The different types of anesthesia are broadly described as: Local anesthesia (agents, either topical or injectable, given to temporarily block paın in a specific part of the bødy) in which the medication only removes sensation from one part of your bødy, but you are not unconscious. Regional anesthesia (injected agents, to numb a portion of the bødy) General anesthesia (an agent, given either by mask or an IV line, to induce unconsciousness) General anesthesia is highly effective in keeping you unaware of your surgical procedure. Monitored anesthesia care (also known as "twilight sleep") It can be given intravenously (IV, by injection into the vein). The medication works quickly and typically puts you to sleep in under a minute. Medicines administered via the bloodstream begin to take effect quickly, often within minutes. Most people feel very relaxed at the start of IV sedation as the medicines begin to take effect. Many people remember the feeling of relaxation and waking up after the procedure is over but nothing in between. There are different levels of IV sedation, and you may or may not be awake during the procedure. Your anesthesia team will adjust your sedation level throughout the procedure. One other type of anesthesia apart from general is called MAC (monitored anesthesia care), where you are kept sleepy and given paın medication but still breathe independently. Anesthesia can provide sedation ranging from slight (relaxed and mildly sleepy) to deep sleep.
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September 14, 2023 Laughing gas is an anesthetic used by medical professionals to help you remain calm before a procedure. It’s not meant to put you fully to sleep. As laughing gas doesn’t put you fully to sleep, you’ll still be able to hear what’s going on around you. You may still be able to respond to questions that your doctor asks you and follow the instructions that they give you throughout the procedure. Nitrous oxide is a depressant, so it slows your bødy down. Once it kicks in, you may feel: Happy Giggly Light-headed Mild euphoria Relaxed Nitrous oxide gets the name “laughing gas” because of these effects. Some people may also experience mild hallucinations (can experience false perceptions in an altered dream-like state of consciousness) whilst under the use of laughing gas. At the lowest doses, you’ll only feel lightheaded, but as the dose goes up you’ll feel sleepy and experience paın relief. While this type of gas will not put you to sleep, it can make you drowsy as the gas dulls the paın receptors in your brain.
08 January 2006 Laughing gas is nitrous oxide, and it acts as an anaesthetic-type agent. It makes your braın feel a bit woozy in the same way that alcohol does. As a result, if you take some laughing gas, you fell a little bit drınk and a little bit cheerful. If you have enough of it, you start to feel a little bit sleepy, but it's very good at paın kılling. If you're having an operation, it's sometimes used with other anaesthetics to ķíľľ paın and make you more comfortable. It is different from anesthesia, where you essentially go to sleep for a procedure. Although people can sometimes feel sleepy while taking nitrous oxide, they will still be able to respond but with decreased alertness temporarily. Sometimes one might start feeling sleepy or groggy as if you really want to fall asleep; you may be pretty out of it when you come to consciousness.
27 March 2023 Nitrous oxide is a colourless gas commonly used as an analgesic - a painkiller - in medicine. The gas can make people relaxed, giggly, light-headed or dizzy. According to the ADA, a patient under nitrous oxide will still have the ability to hear their general dentist and respond to any questions. Although it is not going to put a patient to sleep, nitrous oxide will help relax the bødy and mind. After a few minutes of breathing in the laughing gas through a mask the bødy might feel tingly or heavy and the patient will feel light-headed. It can actually help ease any feelings of anxiety before the procedure. If given nitrous oxide, they will feel sleepy, relaxed and perhaps a bit forgetful. They will still be aware of their surroundings, not necessarily put a patient to sleep. The mild sedative simply helps a patient relax but not intentionally fall asleep per se. The nitrous oxide slows down your nervous system to make you feel less inhibited. You may feel light-headed, tingly, and can be turned off when time for the patient to become more alert and awake. You might feel slightly drowsy, limit your coordination and affect your ability to remember the procedure. Often referred to as conscious sedation because you are awake, though in a state of depressed alertness. You will feel relaxed and may even fall into a light sleep. It differs from general anesthesia, whence patients are completely asleep throughout the procedure and won't remember the treatment afterward, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP). Whether or not fully awake, laughing gas can temporarily feel euphoric and even giddy. Once the gas wears off all the effects are gone, and people are fully awake and back to their regular selves, if slightly groggy.
3 NOV 2015 General anesthetics and sedatives work by anesthetizing the brain and central nervous system. You may start feeling lightheaded, before becoming unconscious within a minute or so. Once surgery is done and anesthesia medications are stopped, you’ll slowly wake up in the operating room or recovery room. You’ll probably feel groggy and a bit confused. Because of the amnestic effect, you probably will not remember feeling somnolent. When first waking from anesthesia, you may feel confused, drowsy, and foggy. Some people may become confused, disoriented, dizzy or trouble remembering things after surgery. General anesthesia is essentially a medically induced coma. Your doctor administers medication to make you unconsciousness so that you won’t move or feel any pain during the operation.
6 NOV 2013 ANESTHESIA If you’re having general anesthesia, an anesthesiologist will give you medications that make you lose consciousness. After the surgery is complete, you won’t be wide awake right away. General anesthesia brings on a sleep-like state with the use of a combination of medicines. The medicines, known as anesthetics, are given before and during surgery or other medical procedures. General anesthesia usually uses a combination of intravenous medicines and inhaled gasses. You'll feel as though you're asleep. But general anesthesia does more than put you to sleep. You don't feel pain when you're under general anesthesia. This is because your brain doesn't respond to pain signals or reflexes. While you're under anesthesia, the anesthesia team monitors you, watches your body's vital functions, manages your breathing and treats pain related to the procedure. Your surgery might not require general anesthesia, but you might need sedation to be comfortable during the procedure. The effects of sedation, also called twilight sedation and monitored anesthesia care, can include being sleepy but awake and able to talk, or being asleep and unaware of your surroundings. The recovery from sedation is similar to that of general anesthesia but patients usually wake up quicker and their recovery time is shorter. As with general anesthesia, you won’t be able to drive and should probably have someone stay with you for at least the first several hours after you return home. You'll slowly wake either in the operating room or the recovery room. You'll probably feel groggy and a little confused when you first awaken. You may continue to be sleepy, and your judgment and reflexes may take time to return to normal.
Date: 15/12/22 Support Tips: Preparation: in order to best prepare some actions might include ~ Considering your sensory needs- pack a bag with sensory aids such as headphones, earplugs, coloured glasses, stim tools, comfort items and so on to support your comfort whilst at your appointment. Considering your communication needs- perhaps take a trusted friend or family member to support with verbal communication, a hospital passport that you can share with staff or notes including scripted comments or responses that you can refer to during the appointment to support with or replace verbal speech. Wear suitable clothing that can be easily taken on and off. To minimise uncertainty, research what is involved in the procedure before attending so that you have a good idea what to expect. Write out a list of questions to avoid relying on memory during a potentially stressful experience. Plan your travel route in advance and leave plenty of time to get to your appointment to minimise anxiety and allow time to adjust to the environment upon arrival. Engage in calming, grounding techniques prior to the appointment start time. During: whilst at the appointment it may be helpful to ~ Ask for the nurse practitioner to talk you through the procedure in full before it commences, preferably with use of images or demonstrations with relevant equipment. Be open about which aspects of the experience you might struggle with as an Autistic person and request particular adjustments. Engage in grounding techniques such as mindful breathing. Hold on to a stim object that is comforting or acts as a stress reliever. Listen to music to support self-regulation. Share your concerns or worries with the nurse practitioner to invite reassurance or helpful advice. Remember your reason for attending and why it is important for you. Aftercare: following the procedure, it is a good idea to plan in some time for self-care and self-regulation, some ideas might include ~ Get yourself into a sensory safe space where things feel predictable and calm (for e.g. a quiet room with dim lighting, weighted blanket etc). Arrange to debrief/chat to a friend or another supportive person about your experience after leaving your appointment. Arrange to meet with a trusted person following the procedure to support you with getting back home or perhaps to do something you might enjoy together. Engage in your dedicated interest. Acknowledge your achievement in attending and getting through the appointment. Journal about your experience to help with emotional processing. Engage in your favourite stim to release any tension that may remain in your b0dy. Allow yourself to physically rest or sleep once back at home. Date: 15/12/22
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Key messages People have a right to expect: access to the care they need, when they need it and that appropriate reasonable adjustments are made to meet people’s individual needs. This starts from the first point of contact with a hospital. This is not just good practice – it is a legal requirement. staff communicate with them in a way that meets their needs and involves them in decisions about their care they are fully involved in their care and treatment the care and treatment they receive meets all their needs, including making reasonable adjustments where necessary and taking into account any equality characteristics such as age, race and orientation their experiences of care are not dependent on whether or not they have access to specialist teams and practitioners. However: People told us they found it difficult to access care because reasonable adjustments weren't always made. Providers need to make sure they are making appropriate reasonable adjustments to meet people’s individual needs. There is no ‘one-size-fits-all’ solution for communication. Providers need to make sure that staff have the tools and skills to enable them to communicate effectively to meet people’s individual needs. People are not being fully involved in their care and treatment. In many cases, this is because there is not enough listening, communication and involvement. Providers need to make sure that staff have enough time and skills to listen to people and their families so they understand and can meet people’s individual needs. Equality characteristics, such as age, race and orientation, risked being overshadowed by a person’s learning disability or autism because staff lacked knowledge and understanding about inequalities. Providers need to ensure that staff have appropriate training and knowledge so they can meet all of a person’s individual needs. Specialist practitioners and teams cannot hold sole responsibility for improving people’s experiences of care. Providers must make sure that all staff have up-to-date training and the right skills to care for people with a learning disability and autistic people.
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Cͨaͣrͬdͩiͥoͦрⷬhͪoͦвⷡiͥaͣ (feͤaͣrͬ oͦf hͪeͤaͣrͬᴛⷮ dͩiͥs͛eͤaͣs͛eͤ oͦrͬ hͪeͤaͣrͬᴛⷮ aͣᴛⷮᴛⷮaͣcͨᴋⷦs͛). нⷩeͤmͫoͦрⷬhͪoͦвⷡiͥaͣ (feͤaͣrͬ oͦf вⷡloͦoͦdͩ). Noͦs͛oͦcͨoͦmͫeͤрⷬhͪoͦвⷡiͥaͣ (feͤaͣrͬ oͦf hͪoͦs͛рⷬiͥᴛⷮaͣls͛). Рⷬhͪaͣrͬmͫaͣcͨoͦрⷬhͪoͦвⷡiͥaͣ (feͤaͣrͬ oͦf mͫeͤdͩiͥcͨaͣᴛⷮiͥoͦn). ᴛⷮoͦmͫoͦрⷬhͪoͦвⷡiͥaͣ (feͤaͣrͬ oͦf mͫeͤdͩiͥcͨaͣl рⷬrͬoͦcͨeͤdͩuͧrͬeͤs͛ liͥᴋⷦeͤ s͛uͧrͬgeͤrͬiͥeͤs͛). ᴛⷮrͬaͣuͧmͫaͣᴛⷮoͦрⷬhͪoͦвⷡiͥaͣ (feͤaͣrͬ oͦf iͥnjuͧrͬy).
ᔆᵃⁱⁿᵗ ᴮᵃˢⁱˡˡⁱˢᵃ ᴹᵉᵐᵒʳⁱᵃˡ ⁶ ᴶᵃⁿᵘᵃʳʸ ᴾʳᵒᶠⁱˡᵉ ᴹᵃʳʳⁱᵉᵈ ᶜʰᵃˢᵗᵉˡʸ ᵗᵒ ᔆᵃⁱⁿᵗ ᴶᵘˡⁱᵃⁿ‧ ᵀʰᵉ ᵗʷᵒ ᶜᵒⁿᵛᵉʳᵗᵉᵈ ᵗʰᵉⁱʳ ʰᵒᵐᵉ ⁱⁿᵗᵒ ᵃ ʰᵒˢᵖⁱᵗᵃˡ ʷʰⁱᶜʰ ᶜᵒᵘˡᵈ ʰᵒᵘˢᵉ ᵘᵖ ᵗᵒ ¹⸴⁰⁰⁰! ᴮᵃˢⁱˡⁱˢˢᵃ ᶜᵃʳᵉᵈ ᶠᵒʳ ˢⁱᶜᵏ ʷᵒᵐᵉⁿ ⁱⁿ ᵒⁿᵉ ʷⁱⁿᵍ⸴ ᴶᵘˡⁱᵃⁿ ᵗʰᵉ ᵐᵉⁿ ⁱⁿ ᵃⁿᵒᵗʰᵉʳ‧ ᴰⁱᵉᵈ ᵒᶠ ⁿᵃᵗᵘʳᵃˡ ᶜᵃᵘˢᵉˢ ᶜᵃⁿᵒⁿⁱᶻᵉᵈ ᴾʳᵉ⁻ᶜᵒⁿᵍʳᵉᵍᵃᵗⁱᵒⁿ
ᴳᴵᴿᴸ'ᔆ ᶠᴬᵀᴬᴸ ᶠᴬᴸᴸ ᴵᴺᵀᴼ ᴾᴼᴼᴸ ᔆʸᴰᴺᴱʸ⸴ ‧ ᵀᵘᵉˢᵈᵃʸ‧ — ᴰᵒʳᵉᵉⁿ ᵂᵃᵗˢᶠᵒʳᵈ⸴ ¹²⸴ ᵒᶠ ᴾᵃᶜⁱᶠⁱᶜ ᴴⁱᵍʰʷᵃʸ⸴ ᴮᵉʳᵒʷʳᵃ⸴ ᶠᵉˡˡ ³⁰ ᶠᵉᵉᵗ ᵈᵒʷⁿ ᵇᵉˡᵒʷ ⁿᵉᵃʳ ᵃ ʷᵃᵗᵉʳᶠᵃˡˡ ᵃᵗ ᴮᵉʳᵒʷʳᵃ ᵗᵒ⁻ᵈᵃʸ‧ ᔆʰᵉ ʷᵃˢ ᶜˡⁱᵐᵇⁱⁿᵍ ᵒᵛᵉʳ ˢᵒᵐᵉ ᵐᵒˢˢ ᶜᵒᵛᵉʳᵉᵈ ʳᵒᶜᵏˢ ⁿᵉᵃʳ ᵂᵃᵗᵉʳᶠᵃˡˡ ʷʰᵉⁿ ˢʰᵉ ˢˡⁱᵖᵖᵉᵈ ᵃⁿᵈ ᶠᵉˡˡ ⁱⁿᵗᵒ ʷᵃᵗᵉʳ ³⁰ ᶠᵉᵉᵗ ᵇᵉˡᵒʷ‧ ᵂʰⁱˡᵉ ᶠᵃˡˡⁱⁿᵍ⸴ ᶠᵒˡⁱᵃᵍᵉ ᵍʳᵒʷⁱⁿᵍ ᶠʳᵒᵐ ʳᵒᶜᵏˢ ᵇʳᵒᵏᵉ ʰᵉʳ ᶜʰⁱⁿ ᵃⁿᵈ ᵉᵛᵉⁿ ʰᵉʳ ʷⁱⁿᵈᵖⁱᵖᵉ‧ ᶠᵃᵗᵃˡ ᶠᵃˡˡ ᴰᵒʷⁿ ᴳᵒʳᵍᵉ — — — ^ — — — ᔆʸᵈⁿᵉʸ⸴ ᴶᵘⁿᵉ ²⁹‧— ᶠᵃᵗᵃˡ ⁱⁿʲᵘʳⁱᵉˢ ʷᵉʳᵉ ʳᵉᶜᵉⁱᵛᵉᵈ ᵇʸ ᴰᵒʳᵉᵉⁿ ᵂᵃᵗˢᶠᵒʳᵈ ⁽¹²⁾ ʷʰᵉⁿ ˢʰᵉ ᶠᵉˡˡ ³⁵ ᶠᵗ‧ ᵈᵒʷⁿ ᵃ ᵍᵒʳᵍᵉ ᵃᵗ ᴮᵒʳᵒʷʳᵃ ᵗᵒ⁻ᵈᵃʸ‧ ᔆʰᵉ ʷᵃˢ ʷᵃˡᵏⁱⁿᵍ ᵗʰʳᵒᵘᵍʰ ᵗʰᵉ ᵇᵘˢʰ ʷⁱᵗʰ ʰᵉʳ ᶜᵒᵘˢⁱⁿ ʷʰᵉⁿ ʰᵉʳ ᶠᵒᵒᵗ ˢˡⁱᵖᵖᵉᵈ ᵒⁿ ᵃ ʳᵒᶜᵏ ᵃᵗ ᵗʰᵉ ᵉⁿᵈ ᵒᶠ ᵗʰᵉ ᵍᵒʳᵍᵉ‧ ᴬ ˢʰᵃʳᵖ ᵖⁱᵉᶜᵉ ᵒᶠ ᵃ ᵗʳᵉᵉ ᵖᵉⁿᵉᵗʳᵃᵗᵉᵈ‧ ᴴᵉʳ ʲᵃʷ ʷᵃˢ ᶠʳᵃᶜᵗᵘʳᵉᵈ ᵃⁿᵈ ˢʰᵉ ᵖᵃˢˢᵉᵈ ˢʰᵒʳᵗˡʸ ᵃᶠᵗᵉʳ ᵃⁿ ᵃᵐᵇᵘˡᵃⁿᶜᵉ ʰᵃᵈ ᵗᵃᵏᵉⁿ ʰᵉʳ ᵗᵒ ᵗʰᵉ ᴴᵒʳⁿˢᵇʸ ᴴᵒˢᵖⁱᵗᵃˡ
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😷 https://lifehacker.com/what-your-pediatrician-should-and-shouldnt-do-during-a-1822524179 😷
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June 11, 2014 • Anesthesia induces a deep state of unconsciousness in a matter of seconds, but it can take several hours to return to normal after waking. Many people experience confusion, sleepiness, and even delirium. Consciousness is the awareness of subjective states such as emotion, inner thoughts, ideas, intentions, and mental states. Without consciousness, an organism has no awareness, while consciousness is often explained as the awareness of emotion, the ability to think and to remember past events and anticipate current ones. General anesthesia affects your entire body. Other types of anesthesia affect specific regions. Most people are awake during operations with local or regional anesthesia. General anesthesia dampens stimulation, knocks you unconscious and keeps you from moving during the operation. General anesthesia has 3 main stages: going under (induction), staying under (maintenance) and recovery (emergence). A specially trained anesthesiologist or nurse anesthetist gives you the proper doses and continuously monitors your vital signs—such as heart rate, body temperature, blood pressure and breathing. The first is an inability to remember things, but can’t recall them after waking up. Next, patients lose the ability to respond. Finally they go into deep sedation. General anesthesia looks more like a coma—a reversible coma. You lose awareness and the ability to feel pain, form memories and move. Once you’ve become unconscious, the anesthesiologist uses monitors and medications to keep you that way. Lack of Consciousness. Keeps you from being aware of your surroundings. Analgesia. Blocks your ability to feel pain. Amnesia. Prevents formation of memories. Loss of Movement. Relaxes your muscles and keeps you still during surgery. Stable Body Functions.
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