Sickcore Emojis & Text

Copy & Paste Sickcore Emojis & Symbols https://www.verywellhealth.com/sore-throat-and-cou

.--. .--. (_ _) "SICK" (_ _) I CANNOT GO TO SCHOOL TODAY )( -by Shel Silverstein )( Said little Peggy Ann McKay. /__\ /__\ [____] __,--"""""""--,__ [____] "I have the measles and the mumps, ) ( _/ \_ ) ( A gash, a rash, and purple bumps. \__/ / ((((((()))) \ \__/ My mouth is wet, my throat is dry, [ _]/ (((((((())))))) \[ ] I'm going blind in my right eye. [(_`"-._((((((( ))))))--"`_) ] [ ) (((( ,_ _, )))) ( ] My tonsils are as big as rocks, [ / (() |*| |*| (() \ ] I've counted sixteen chicken pox. [/ ()) ''' ''' ()) \ ] And there's one more- ( (() '' ^ '' (() )] ...that's seventeen! [ ())'. C====O.'()) / ] And don't you think [(\_/) (() '-._____.-' (()( ( ] ...my face looks green? ./o o\())____/ \____())____) . :(= Y =)@-----'---`-----@--------: My leg is cut, my eyes are blue- |/`----'/|\ /|\ \It might be instamatic flu. |``________________________________ I cough and sneeze and gasp and choke | |\'.'''.'''.".'.'".'..'".'.'.'."" I'm sure that my left leg is broke. | |'\.'"..'...."'"'..'...'.'.'.'.'..'.\ | |.'\.''.'...'''"'..'..'.'.'.'..'. My hip hurts when I move my chin, | |.'.\.'"..'.'."".'".'..'.'.".'.'. My belly button's caving in, | |.'.'\'.".'.".'.".''.'".'.'".'.'. My back is wrenched, | |.".'.\'.'..'.".'.'.-".'.'.'.- '.' ...my ankle's sprained, | |.'.' .\'.'.''.''.''.''.'.'.''.'' My 'pendix pains each time it rains. | |'.'.' .\'".'.-".'.''".''.-'".'.'.'.".'.'.'.\ \ |.'.'." .\".'.'-'.'".'..'.'.'.'.' My nose is cold, my toes are numb, \|.'.'..".'\".'.''.'..".'.''-'''.' I have a sliver in my thumb. \'.'.'.''.'\.'.''.'..'".'.'..'.'. My neck is stiff, my spine is weak. \.'.'.'".'.\'.'".'.'.'".'.".".'. I hardly whisper when I speak. \'".'.".".'\".'.'.".'.'-".'.".'.'.'."."-".'.'.'\ \.'.".'.".'\'.'.".'-'.''.'.'.'.'.'.".'.'.".'.'.\ \'.'.'".".'\'.'.".'.-''".".'. My tongue is filling up my mouth, \'.".'.'.".\'.'.'.'.".'.'.'. I think my hair is falling out. \".'.".'.".\".'-".." .".'.' My elbow's bent- \ \'.".''.".'\".'.'." .'.' ". ...my spine ain't straight. \".'.-'.".'\.'.'- .'.".'. My temperature is one-o-eight. \".".'.'.'|~.-~~-.~~-~.'~-~-.-'~-~..~~'-~-~-~-~| \'.'.''.'|.".'.'..-'.'. My brain is shrunk, I cannot hear, \".'..".|".''.''.'.".' There is a hole inside my ear. \'.".'.|".''..'.'.'.' I have a hangnail, and my heart is- \".'.'|".-.'..'..-'.' ...WHAT? \'.'.|.'.'.-'.'.'.".'..'".'.'.".'.'.".'"..| \'.'|'.'.".'.'..'. What's that? What's that you say? \.'|".''.'-'.'.'. You say today is...Saturday? \'|.-.'-'.-".'." G'bye, I'm going out to play!" \|jgs''.'.'.'.'.'-'.'".'.'.'".'.'.'.'"| ~~~~`~~~`~~~``~~~~```~~~~~`~~~~`~~~~~
ᶜᵃʳᶜⁱⁿᵒᵖʰᵒᵇⁱᵃ ⁽ᶠᵉᵃʳ ᵒᶠ ᵍᵉᵗᵗⁱⁿᵍ ᶜᵃⁿᶜᵉʳ⁾‧ ᶜᵃʳᵈⁱᵒᵖʰᵒᵇⁱᵃ ⁽ᶠᵉᵃʳ ᵒᶠ ʰᵉᵃʳᵗ ᵈⁱˢᵉᵃˢᵉ ᵒʳ ʰᵉᵃʳᵗ ᵃᵗᵗᵃᶜᵏˢ⁾‧ ᶜˡᵃᵘˢᵗʳᵒᵖʰᵒᵇⁱᵃ ⁽ᶠᵉᵃʳ ᵒᶠ ᵉⁿᶜˡᵒˢᵉᵈ ˢᵖᵃᶜᵉˢ ˡⁱᵏᵉ ᴹᴿᴵ ᵐᵃᶜʰⁱⁿᵉˢ⁾‧ ᴴᵉᵐᵒᵖʰᵒᵇⁱᵃ ⁽ᶠᵉᵃʳ ᵒᶠ ᵇˡᵒᵒᵈ⁾‧ ᴹʸˢᵒᵖʰᵒᵇⁱᵃ ᵒʳ ᵍᵉʳᵐᵒᵖʰᵒᵇⁱᵃ ⁽ᶠᵉᵃʳ ᵒᶠ ᵍᵉʳᵐˢ⁾‧ ᴺᵒˢᵒᶜᵒᵐᵉᵖʰᵒᵇⁱᵃ ⁽ᶠᵉᵃʳ ᵒᶠ ʰᵒˢᵖⁱᵗᵃˡˢ⁾‧ ᴺᵒˢᵒᵖʰᵒᵇⁱᵃ ⁽ᶠᵉᵃʳ ᵒᶠ ᵈⁱˢᵉᵃˢᵉ⁾‧ ᴾʰᵃʳᵐᵃᶜᵒᵖʰᵒᵇⁱᵃ ⁽ᶠᵉᵃʳ ᵒᶠ ᵐᵉᵈⁱᶜᵃᵗⁱᵒⁿ⁾‧ ᵀʰᵃⁿᵃᵗᵒᵖʰᵒᵇⁱᵃ ⁽ᶠᵉᵃʳ ᵒᶠ ᵈᵉᵃᵗʰ⁾‧ ᵀᵒᵐᵒᵖʰᵒᵇⁱᵃ ⁽ᶠᵉᵃʳ ᵒᶠ ᵐᵉᵈⁱᶜᵃˡ ᵖʳᵒᶜᵉᵈᵘʳᵉˢ ˡⁱᵏᵉ ˢᵘʳᵍᵉʳⁱᵉˢ⁾‧ ᵀʳᵃᵘᵐᵃᵗᵒᵖʰᵒᵇⁱᵃ ⁽ᶠᵉᵃʳ ᵒᶠ ⁱⁿʲᵘʳʸ⁾‧ ᵀʳʸᵖᵃⁿᵒᵖʰᵒᵇⁱᵃ ⁽ᶠᵉᵃʳ ᵒᶠ ⁿᵉᵉᵈˡᵉˢ⁾
https://www.verywellhealth.com/sore-throat-and-cough-7369467
https://www.verywellhealth.com/post-nasal-drip-symptoms-causes-and-treatment-5323634#
pls note the ai inflicts emotional damage (ᵕ—ᴗ—)
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https://www.goodrx.com/conditions/cough/when-to-see-doctor-for-cough
https://www.goodrx.com/conditions/cold-symptoms/when-to-see-doctor-for-sore-throat
https://www.verywellhealth.com/signs-a-cough-is-getting-better-7500660
| | | | o o | | > | | \_/ | \___/ __| |__ / \ | | | | _________________| | | |_____________---__ / | |_____| | / / / /| mga / /_| _ |_\ / / / / | / / / / / / /__/ / /| /____________________/ / / /__________/___\_/_/ / | |____________________| |_| |__________________|/ | |____________________| |_| |__________________| / ____| | | | | | || | / | o o | o o || o o | / |______________|_____________||_______________|/ _______________________________________________________
😷 https://www.findatopdoc.com/Parenting/When-a-Child-with-Autism-Refuses-Treatment 😷
😷 https://www.sensoryfriendly.net/how-to-create-a-sensory-friendly-ambulance/ 😷
😷 https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/autism-and-anxiety/201904/medical-visits-and-autism-better-way 😷
💊🩹🩺💉🩸
@notfeelingverywell You know what’s such a good trope When, in hurt comfort fics, the injured/sick one looks so vulnerable that the other characters have a realization about how small/young/fragile they are and get a renewed surge of protectiveness January 16th, 2023, 3:08 PM

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Concerns to ask the doc if needed 😷 Although benefits can outweigh much, it’s still a worry. Even if it temporarily lasts a second, a person's pain should be taken into account. I’m not saying you should go under deep sedation just to get teeth cleaned, especially if you don’t need it. If you are having trouble tolerating certain exams, tell them to keep it in mind so the procedure can be easier on both of you. If you experience intense pain and find it hard to tolerate, request for ways to make it easier. Thank you for taking the time to care for me (be sure to show gratitude before, during and/or after) Can you explain the procedure to me? How long will it take? Can we count up or down to the number? Can you explain what you're doing as you begin to do it? Because it’s been hard in the past when X, so can we look at some techniques? Can I drink water before or during the procedure? Do you have a heat pack or ice pack nearby? I want to get it over with and I’d like it to be easy for both of us. If you have a distraction tool (like telling jokes) to use I’d still like to let you know about X knowing my concerns will still be taken into account. Can we talk beforehand and walk me through the procedure as it will happen, step by step? Do you have any non invasive ways to check for X? Can you do it another way instead? Do you have any smaller and/or softer instruments to get the job done? Can you apply something (like warmth, gel, etc.) to the instrument beforehand? Is there a way to get around it? Can I say if I wanted to stop (said procedure) during any time? Can I make informed decisions to decline X? When it comes to certain exams, I’ve sensory issues, trauma, etc. Do you know any breathing exercises or any methods to accommodate my specific needs? It’s not anything personal, it’s not distrust, but I want it to go easy for both of us. 😷
🍑 https://www.mayoclinic.org/tests-procedures/pelvic-exam/about/pac-20385135 🍑
😷 If it’s a same day appointment without any preparation beforehand, still let them know any needs. Even if it’s not worth it to spend nearly an hour on preparing something especially for you, still let them know what might work best for you. If they need to use a speculum, ask for a small one! Even if they can’t use all their time convincing you of how convenient something might be, still tell them if you cannot do certain methods while feeling safe. Is there something on hand to relieve even a little pain? Can it be self administered at home? Can you sit in a different chair? If you cannot possibly resolve something as much as you’d like, ask for them to at least tell you what’s going on and ask how they might cope with similar sensations. Can an X-ray be done instead of a biopsy? If not, ask for them to take your concerns into account and go from there, such as a less invasive tool designed for the same purpose. Wear a long skirt or a dress so you can just pull it up rather than take your clothes off. You can also bring a jacket or different pants to change into. Take headphones and listen to music, explain you're nervous and would not like to hear much about what's going on but just to be told when they've started and when they've finished. Focus in on what you're listening to. Say if it’s your first time doing a certain procedure and mention your concerns. Acknowledge you understand people don’t necessarily enjoy it for fun. Knowing can make you less anxious. It’s definitely worth asking something like ‘I do find this procedure extremely painful, could you try with a X?’ The procedure is easier for them to perform if you’re not squirming around in pain so there’s no reason for them not to at least try. Pamper yourself. Count as you breathe. Breathe in 1-2-3-4. Breathe out 1-2-3-4. If the doctor's good, they'll keep you talking and talk to you for further distraction, and walk you through each step they take. Most of the time, certain tests don't take much longer than 30 seconds and afterwards they'll leave you alone so you can recover if you need it. Talk to them beforehand so they know you're anxious, and see what they can do to help you get through it. Knowing options are always open to you if you need it can help put you at ease. Knowing what certain tests feel like can make it go smoother and easier to manage. Mentally walk yourself through the procedure before it happens while doing slow breathing exercises - breath in for five counts and out for five (or longer) while walking yourself through what to expect with your eyes closed. If at any point you get nervous, keep breathing and open your eyes. Once comfortable, continue through the procedure and just keep breathing. Don’t dismiss true concerns so you can decide what might be best for you. Gather all available facts to make informed decisions with the medics. Discuss the procedure with the medic and what they will do and when it happens. While the procedure happens, ask them to explain what which thing it is they’re doing next and how it might feel. Tell them if at any point you express discomfort, they check in with you and do not proceed until you give them the green light. Make sure nothing is put in you if you have not consented to or understand the purpose of. It’ll help you stay in some control if you are allowed to say if you wanted to stop at any given time to get through it. Anyone could find any experience distressing, but one’s distress can be magnified by the facts of how they are autistic, traumatized, etc. Just like with any other condition, doctors should have to take into account a particular person in their office and adjust what they’re doing to meet the needs of said patient. Jot down in advance everything you want to discuss to know exactly why, when and how something is to be. Ask for details and mention anything. Think about the muscles in your legs as you close your eyes. Imagine you’re at home, or think of a show. Anything to make it seem less intimidating. Give them notes you’ve taken. Ask if you can pace. Even if you aren’t a child, you still may need the catering even if you understand what medics are for. Make kits. Ask them to listen to you and to take time with you to make it more comforting. Advocate as feedback. 😷
Tips 😷 Depending on the procedure, meet the one treating you to see if they are a good fit for you. If they seem nice and willing, find something where you can both agree to make it better for the both of you. If you can notify them ahead of time, mention your needs. “I have autism which might contribute to my discomfort. What can I bring to the clinic? Can I leave my pants on, or can I wear a skirt instead of having to undress? Can you prepare smaller medical tools? Do you have sedatives? Are numbing agents readily available? Do you have a room with an adjustable seat? What’s the best treatment for me? Are there other options to make it easier to get care?” Look up pictures of the place, visit it, read any rule policies and see if they can accommodate to getting special permission for certain aspects. Get a personalized treatment plan. Use telemedicine, an appointment over video, phone call or text chat, when available and appropriate. Ask about at home tests you can send. Tell your doctor about your worries. They might be able to help you address them.
Tips 💉 Depending on the procedure meet the one treating you to see if they are a good fit for you. If they seem nice and willing, find something where you can both agree to make it better for the both of you. If you can notify them ahead of time, mention your needs. “I have autism which might contribute to my discomfort. What can I bring to the clinic? Can I leave my pants on, or can I wear a skirt instead of having to undress? Can you prepare smaller medical tools? Do you have sedatives? Are numbing agents readily available? Do you have a room with an adjustable seat? What’s the best treatment for me? Are there other options to make it easier to get care?” Look up pictures of the place, visit it, read any rule policies and see if they can accommodate to getting special permission for certain aspects. Get a personalized treatment plan. Mention you’ve special needs regarding X. Use telemedicine, an appointment over video, phone call or text chat, when available and appropriate. Ask about at home tests you can send. Tell your doctor about your worries. They might be able to help you address them.
😷 If it’s a same day appointment without any preparation beforehand, still let them know any needs. Even if it’s not worth it to spend nearly an hour on preparing something especially for you, still let them know what might work best. If they need to use a speculum, ask for a small one! Even if they can’t use all their time convincing you of how convenient something might be, still tell them if you cannot do certain methods while feeling safe. Is there something on hand to relieve even a little pain? Can it be self administered at home? Can you sit in a different chair? If you cannot possibly resolve something as much as you’d like, ask for them to at least tell you what’s going on and ask how they might cope with similar sensations. Can an X-ray be done instead of a biopsy? If not, ask for them to take your concerns into account and go from there, such as a less invasive tool designed for the same purpose. 😷
😷 Wear a long skirt or a dress so you can just pull it up rather than taking your clothes. You can also bring a jacket or different pants to change into. 😷
😷 Pamper yourself. Count as you breathe. Breathe in 1-2-3-4. Breathe out 1-2-3-4. If the doctor's good, they'll keep you talking and talk to you for further distraction walking you through each step they take. Most of the time, certain tests don't take much longer than 30 seconds and afterwards they'll leave you alone so you can recover if you need it. Talk to them beforehand so they know you're anxious and see what they can do to help you get through it. Knowing options are always open to you if you need them can help put you at ease.
Skin 🧴 Skin protects the insides of the body. Human skin can range from light peachy cream colour to dark brown depending on the amount of melanin produced. Sun exposure and genetics can also play a role. 🧴
Say if it’s your first time doing a certain procedure and mention your concerns. Acknowledge you understand people don’t necessarily enjoy it for fun. Knowing can make you less anxious. 😷 It’s definitely worth asking something like ‘I do find this procedure extremely painful, could you try with a X?’ The procedure is easier for them to perform if you’re not squirming around in pain so there’s no reason for them not to at least try.
😷 Take headphones and listen to music, explain you're nervous and would not like to hear much about what's going on but just to be told when they've started and when they've finished. Focus in on what you're listening to.
Knowing what certain tests feel like can make it go smoother and easier to manage. Mentally walk yourself through the procedure before it happens while doing slow breathing exercises - breath in for five counts and out for five (or longer) while walking yourself through what to expect with your eyes closed. If at any point you get nervous, keep breathing and open your eyes. Once comfortable, continue through the procedure and just keep breathing. 😷
💙 Most kids with ASD are either hypersensitive or hyposensitive to stimuli like noises, lights, touch, etc. If someone has Autism and/or PTSD, he/she may be more prone to sensory overload and startle more easily. That means there’s not much information about how typical treatment methods can or should be adjusted for patients with ASD. According to this article, a nurse could… Offer home-based services Use more visual aids, such as gradient scales to describe degrees of emotion Keep appointment times regular and predictable as much as possible Provide sensory toys or allow children to bring their own Emphasize the possibility of a “happy ending” after trauma―​“this correlates well with the documented effectiveness of social stories, narratives and role-playing in therapy involving individuals with ASD” Be mindful of how often society dismisses the emotions of autistic people Involve other trusted caregivers …and more. Essentially, the therapist should keep the child’s unique strengths and limitations in mind at each step and be open to flexibility. Remember to… Not take behavior personally Be willing to listen without pressuring him/her to talk Identify possible triggers and help him/her avoid them Remain calm and understanding when he/she is emotional Let him/her make age-appropriate choices so he/she feels in control of his/her life Be patient 💙
🍑 https://www.healthdirect.gov.au/blog/self-test-makes-cervical-screening-pap-smear-even-easier 🍑
😷 https://about.kaiserpermanente.org/health-and-wellness/our-care/exploring-the-promise-of-at-home-cervical-cancer-screening 😷
😷 https://www.health.gov.au/ministers/the-hon-ged-kearney-mp/media/pap-smears-can-be-replaced-by-do-it-yourself-cervical-cancer-tests 😷
🍑 https://www.health.gov.au/self-collection-for-the-cervical-screening-test 🍑
😷 Before beginning trauma-focused therapy it is important to stabilise the individual with emotional coping strategies and creating feelings of safety. Support strategies that have been found to be helpful in the general population include: mindfulness and grounding in the present moment creating feelings of safety (for example an object/picture that symbolises safety) sensory soothing Autistic people may require: a greater number of sessions a longer or shorter duration to each session regular breaks. 😷
😷 Treatments should be appropriately adapted for autistic people and their individual needs. (Rumball et al. 2020) and Kerns et al. (2022) suggest a number of other events that autistic people found traumatic: abandonment by/loss of a loved one (for example a family member, pet or support staff) sensory experiences (for example fire alarms) transitions and change (for example school transitions, routine changes with the seasons, unpredictability in day to day life) social difficulties and confusion (for example difficulties interpreting social cues, misunderstandings and conflicts) events related to one’s own mental health difficulties (for example psychotic experiences). Autistic people may also be more likely to find these experiences traumatic due to autistic characteristics such as: sensory sensitivities communication and social interaction differences distress around changes to routines distress if prevented from taking part in repetitive and restricted behaviours such as stimming. Some theories suggest that other factors associated with being autistic, may mean an increased risk of developing or maintaining PTSD symptoms But just because symptoms aren’t crippling doesn’t mean you're not affected. 😷
😷 https://neurodivergentinsights.com/misdiagnosis-monday/ptsd-and-autism 😷
💙 https://neurodivergentinsights.com/misdiagnosis-monday/ptsd-and-autism 💙
😷 Keep a diary of the situations that make you feel anxious and note how you’ve reacted in each situation. This will help you identify potential triggers for your anxiety. 😷
😷 Remember that you are not alone and can discuss these issues with a trusted mental health provider. Exploring treatment options with a healthcare provider Exercising to reduce stress Setting realistic goals Breaking up large tasks into smaller ones Spending time with friends and family Confiding in trusted friends or relatives Seeking out comforting situations, places, and people Seeking out support from friends and family Finding a support group Learning to feel good about one’s actions in the face of danger Having a positive coping strategy Being able to act and respond effectively despite feeling fearful Medication and expectation management strategies may also be included in an overall treatment plan. 😷
😷 If you can, look for a trauma-informed healthcare provider, or a provider that has experience helping people who have experienced trauma. If your current provider doesn’t listen to your concerns or makes you uncomfortable, remember that you can absolutely seek out a different practitioner. 😷
💉 https://news.vanderbilt.edu/2011/09/21/bloodwork-toolkit/ 💉
💙 An Autism Specific Care Plan helps families give hospital staff important information. It tells them how to communicate and interact with the child and keep them safe. Families who use Autism Specific Care Plans feel happier with their care and feel that health care providers are better at working with their child or teen with autism. Hospitals and emergency rooms can also think about making changes to help patients with autism. Small changes can all help lower anxiety for kids and adults with autism. Some of these changes include keeping wait times short, creating a calm space, and playing a movie in the waiting area. Making sure parents are part of all medical care and treated as experts on their child can help both families and staff. Finally, hospital staff can try communicating in the way the patient prefers (talking vs. typing, etc.). 💙
😷 https://theconversation.com/if-your-child-is-afraid-of-or-refusing-a-medical-procedure-heres-how-to-help-170923 😷
😷 https://www.statnews.com/2020/02/25/adults-dont-need-booster-vaccinations-for-tetanus-diphtheria-study/ 😷
😷 https://kidsinpain.ca/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/Vaccine-Pain-Needle-Fear-Resources-v2-November-2021.pdf 😷
💙 https://www.spectrumnews.org/features/deep-dive/unseen-agony-dismantling-autisms-house-of-pain/ 💙
💙 https://www.legalzoom.com/articles/what-is-medical-power-of-attorney 💙
💙 https://www.verywellhealth.com/guardianship-for-adults-with-autism-4165687 💙
💙 PFA TIPS: PAIN MANAGEMENT AND AUTISM By Alizah Patterson, MD, Pediatric Resident, PL-3 , The Herman & Walter Samuelson Children’s Hospital at Sinai Download a printable version of “Pain Management and Autism “ Sensory stimulation can be perceived very differently in people with autism spectrum disorder. It is common for children to be averse to certain types of taste, texture, and flavors. How they perceive pain, however, is not very well understood. Some people believe that people with autism may have a decreased sense of pain, but pain can manifest in different ways. Identifying and managing pain can be challenging for both healthcare providers and parents. Methods to assess pain Assessing pain in children can often be a challenge for providers and parents. For older children, the number pain scale is typically used with 0 representing no pain and 10 being the worst pain imaginable. The faces pain scale allows children to choose a face – images range from happy to crying – that shows how their pain is making them feel. For children who are nonverbal, the FLACC score is often utilized. This method looks at Facial expression, Leg positioning, Activity level, Crying and Consolability. This pain scale requires more time but can reliably assess pain responses in neurotypical individuals. People with ASD or intellectual disability, or any type of cognitive impairment may express pain in other ways and may require a customized FLACC scale. This would incorporate individualized pain behaviors which is more reliable in detecting pain in individuals with cognitive impairment. Again, this would require additional time and understanding of the scale. Research on autism and pain Not much research has been done on the topic of autism and pain, partly due to the challenges of assessing pain in children with communication difficulty and partly due to the common belief that people with autism have decreased sensitivity to pain or a high pain threshold. Studies conducted with people with high-functioning ASD tend to use a pain scale of 0-10. On this scale, patients tend to respond with lower numbers, but other methods of rating pain have shown varying results. Some studies have used observations of providers or parents, which also tended to show decreased sensitivity to pain in children with autism. Other studies have challenged the idea that people with autism experience less pain. These studies found that pain is expressed differently among those with autism. One study comparing children with autism, children with intellectual disabilities, and neurotypical children showed that both behavioral changes and physiologic changes (i.e. heart rate) were higher with pain, but face scores did not vary among the groups. Some case studies have found that when asked their pain score, verbal individuals with ASD respond with low scores, but when asked how much discomfort they have, the score tends to be higher. How does pain manifest in children with autism? Children with ASD may not express pain in typical ways – crying, moaning, or withdrawing from a painful stimulus – and therefore may often be labeled as less sensitive to pain. Several case studies have shown that though children may not show these typical signs or may not react to pain in the moment, they still have physiologic reactions and behavioral reactions. Even with no obvious reaction to a painful stimulus, they may start breathing fast or their heart rate may increase. They may have increased stimming behaviors, aggression, or anxiety after the painful incident. Individuals with ASD also tend to show behavior changes for longer after the painful incident than neurotypical children or children with intellectual disabilities. When assessing for pain in a nonverbal child with ASD, close attention should be paid to increased aggression, self-injurious behaviors, stimming, or any behavior that is not typical for that child. If they are acting unlike themselves, look for a possible source of discomfort or pain that may be present or was present in the near past. In a more verbal child, asking if they have pain or if something hurts may not accurately reflect what they are feeling. Using words such as “discomfort”, “uncomfortable”, or “anxiety” may better approximate the level of pain they are in. What can I do about my child’s pain? If a source of pain can be identified, treating that pain is of utmost importance. Treatment would be the same as for any other child—analgesics such as Tylenol or ibuprofen, ice, or heat (if tolerated), and rest. Parents and providers should be wary of hidden injuries that the patient may not be able to communicate about, such as a fracture or insect bite. If the source of pain cannot be identified or you are unsure of the severity of the injury/illness, always err on the side of caution and have a physician assess your child. They should do a full skin exam to look for scratches, bites, rashes, or other injuries. If an injury is suspected to a limb, x-rays may be needed to rule out a fracture. If no clear injury or illness can be identified, parents and providers should look for other possible medical causes for the behavior changes, like abdominal pain, headache, or urinary tract infection. For pain management during painful or stress-inducing medical procedures, like a blood draw, there are several techniques that can be used. Non-pharmacologic (medication) methods are preferred. Every child may respond differently to these techniques, so some trial and error may be necessary to determine the best method for your child. • Distraction: If your child has a preferred activity, engaging them in this activity during the procedure may significantly reduce their focus on pain. This could include watching a show, blowing bubbles, deep breaths, playing with a toy, or calming movements such as a parent rocking them. • Sensory distractions: There are several items that can be used to distract a child’s senses from the painful stimulus. A vibrating device or ice placed on the area of a blood draw or lumbar puncture can reduce the pain signal sent to the brain. • Topical pain control: There are a few topical medications that can be used to reduce pain sensation. A cooling spray at the site of the procedure is quick and easy. A numbing gel or cream can also be applied 20-30 minutes prior to the procedure, which has been shown to be an effective way to manage pain during IV sticks. However, this has not been shown to reduce anxiety or fear during procedures. • Deep pressure: Firm pressure, through squeezing or a tight hug, has been shown to significantly decrease anxiety and stress in individuals with autism. This method can also be used during medical procedures to decrease discomfort. Every child is different though, so deep pressure may be too much sensory stimulation for some. Medications can also be used to control pain, as well as anxiety, during medical procedures. Pre-medication with acetaminophen or ibuprofen may be helpful in reducing pain. For extremely painful procedures, an opioid may also be reasonable, per a physician’s assessment. Anti-anxiety medications may be helpful in reducing not only anxiety but also pain as they are typically slightly sedating. If you feel it is right for your child, discuss these options with your physician. When it comes to pain management in autism, remember these key points: • Always rule out pain when atypical behaviors occur or when certain behaviors increase. • Children are all different, whether in how their pain manifests or in what strategies work best to control their pain. • There are lots of non-medication options to help manage pain and anxiety during medical procedures. 💙
If feasible, other tests the patient fears might be performed while the patient is sedated. For example, before or after dental work, vaccines could be administered, blood could be drawn, and gynaecology or other physical exams could be done. This practise requires coordination and communication among providers. 💙 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3708482/
___ ___ ___ ___ (-|-)|_ _ (-| \ _ |_ | _ (-|-)_ '| (-| \ _ _ _| | |(/_ _|_/(_)|_||_)|(/_ _| (_||| _|_/(_)(_| ( ( ( ( ,_| - by Shel Silverstein {\______________/} Would you like to buy a dog ( ) with a tail at either end? /||~~~~~~~~~~||\ He is quite the strangest dog |_\\_ _//_| there is in town. "' ""' '"" '" Though he's not too good at knowing just exactly where he's going, He is very, very good at sitting down. He doesn't have a place to put a collar, And I'll admit it's rather __,,__ hard to lead him, .' `. And he cannot hear you call / )----( \ For he has no ears at all, {\/__||_ _||__\/} But it doesn't cost a ~ """''""" ~ single cent to feed him. ( He cannot bite, 8 he'll never bark or growl, 8 ) Just scratch him on his tails, ( 8 he'll find it pleasing. 8 , 8 But you'll have to take him out .=_`-. for twice as many walks, (_-__;_) And I'll bet that you can "'"'"'""""''"' quickly guess the reason.
Cͨaͣrͬdͩiͥoͦрⷬhͪoͦвⷡiͥaͣ (feͤaͣrͬ oͦf hͪeͤaͣrͬᴛⷮ dͩiͥs͛eͤaͣs͛eͤ oͦrͬ hͪeͤaͣrͬᴛⷮ aͣᴛⷮᴛⷮaͣcͨᴋⷦs͛). нⷩeͤmͫoͦрⷬhͪoͦвⷡiͥaͣ (feͤaͣrͬ oͦf вⷡloͦoͦdͩ). Noͦs͛oͦcͨoͦmͫeͤрⷬhͪoͦвⷡiͥaͣ (feͤaͣrͬ oͦf hͪoͦs͛рⷬiͥᴛⷮaͣls͛). Рⷬhͪaͣrͬmͫaͣcͨoͦрⷬhͪoͦвⷡiͥaͣ (feͤaͣrͬ oͦf mͫeͤdͩiͥcͨaͣᴛⷮiͥoͦn). ᴛⷮoͦmͫoͦрⷬhͪoͦвⷡiͥaͣ (feͤaͣrͬ oͦf mͫeͤdͩiͥcͨaͣl рⷬrͬoͦcͨeͤdͩuͧrͬeͤs͛ liͥᴋⷦeͤ s͛uͧrͬgeͤrͬiͥeͤs͛). ᴛⷮrͬaͣuͧmͫaͣᴛⷮoͦрⷬhͪoͦвⷡiͥaͣ (feͤaͣrͬ oͦf iͥnjuͧrͬy).
💟 WHAT MIGHT BE EASIER FOR YOU MIGHT NOT BE SO EASY FOR ME 💟
😷 https://lifehacker.com/what-your-pediatrician-should-and-shouldnt-do-during-a-1822524179 😷
🇮🇪 Cavan Weekly News Published in Cavan, county Cavan SUDDEN DEATH. On Saturday night last, a man named John FAULKNER, residing at Aghaloora, near Kinaleck, was choked by a piece of meat sticking in his throat. This accident is becoming frequent in this neighbourhood, a man named DOWDAL having lost his life the other day at Finea from a similar case. This ought to teach people that good digestion depends very much on proper mastication of our food. December 6, 1878 🇮🇪
ᴱᵈⁿᵃ ᴳˡᵃˢˢᵐᵉʸᵉʳ ᴮᴵᴿᵀᴴ ¹⁹⁰² ᴰᴱᴬᵀᴴ ¹⁴ ᴶᵃⁿ ¹⁹⁰⁵ ⁽ᵃᵍᵉᵈ ²–³⁾ ᵁᔆᴬ ᴮᵁᴿᴵᴬᴸ ᴸⁱᵇᵉʳᵗʸ ᴾʳᵃⁱʳⁱᵉ ᶜᵉᵐᵉᵗᵉʳʸ ᴱᵈʷᵃʳᵈˢᵛⁱˡˡᵉ⸴ ᴹᵃᵈⁱˢᵒⁿ ᶜᵒᵘⁿᵗʸ⸴ ᴵˡˡⁱⁿᵒⁱˢ⸴ ᵁᔆ ᴰᵃᵘᵍʰᵗᵉʳ ᵒᶠ ᴶᵒʰⁿ ᴳˡᵃˢˢᵐᵉʸᵉʳ ᶜʰᵒᵏᵉᵈ ᵗᵒ ᵈᵉ ᵒⁿ ᵃ ᵇᵘᵗᵗᵒⁿ ᴬᵍᵉ ³
Research and ask questions: Educate yourself about potential conditions and treatments, and don’t be afraid to ask your healthcare providers detailed questions about their assessments and the reasons behind them.
8 ᗰᗴᑎᎢᗩし ᕼᗴᗩしᎢᕼ ᖇᗴᗰᏆᑎᗞᗴᖇᔑ Author's 𓂀𝕰𝖑𝖎𝖏𝖆𝖍𖣲̸☘♕ :zap: 11/05/21 ๑۞๑,¸¸,ø¤º°`°๑۩ - ๑۩ ,¸¸,ø¤º°`°๑۞๑ 1. џɵự'ɾɛ ʂʈɨƚƚ ʋɑƚựɑɓƚɛ, ɛʋɛɲ ɨʄ џɵự ʂʈɾựɠɠƚɛ ʈɵ ɠɛʈ ɵựʈ ɵʄ ɓɛƋ ɨɲ ʈɦɛ ɱɵɾɲɨɲɠ. ☆.。.:* - *:.。.☆ 2. џɵự Ƌɛʂɛɾʋɛ ʈɵ ɾɛɕɛɨʋɛ ƚɵʋɛ ɨɲ ɨʈʂ ʄựƚƚɛʂʈ Ƌɨʋɨɲɨʈџ, Ƌɛʂϼɨʈɛ џɵự ɱɛɲʈɑƚ ɦɛɑƚʈɦ ʂʈɑʈựʂ. ☆.。.:* - *:.。.☆ 3. џɵự ƙɛɛϼ ɠɵɨɲɠ, ɛɑɕɦ ʈɨɱɛ,Ƌɛʂϼɨʈɛ ʈɦɛ ɕɦɑƚƚɛɲɠɛʂ џɵự ʄɑɕɛ ɑɲƋ ʈɦɨʂ Ƌɛʂɛɾʋɛʂ џɵựɾ ɑɕƙɲɵϣƚɛƋɠɛɱɛɲʈ ɑɲƋ ϼɾɑɨʂɛ. ☆.。.:* - *:.。.☆ 4. џɵự ʂựɾʋɨʋɛƋ ʈɦɛ Ƌɑɾƙɛʂʈ ϼɛɾɨɵƋʂ ɨɲ ƚɨʄɛ, Ƌɵɲ'ʈ ʂɦџ ɑϣɑџ ʄɾɵɱ ʈɦɛ ɵϼϼɵɾʈựɲɨʈџɓʈɵ ʄɨɲɑƚƚџ ɛӝϼɛɾɨɛɲɕɛ ʈɦɛ ƚɨɠɦʈ. ☆.。.:* - *:.。.☆ 5. џɵự ɑɾɛ ϣɵɾʈɦ ʈɦɛ "ɓựɾƋɛɲ" ɑɲƋ ʈɦɛ ƋɛƋɨɕɑʈɨɵɲ ɵʄ ʈɨɱɛ ʈɦɑʈ ɨʂ ɾɛɋựɨɾɛƋ ʈɵ ɦɛƚϼ џɵự ɾɛɕɵʋɛɾ. ☆.。.:* - *:.。.☆ 6. џɵự ɑɾɛ ƚɵʋɛƋ. џɵự ɑɾɛ ƚɵʋɛƋ Ƌựɾɨɲɠ ʈɦɛ ɠɵɵƋ Ƌɑџʂ, ϣɦɛɲ ʈɦɛ ϣɑɾɱʈɦ ʄɾɵɱ ʈɦɛ ʂựɲ ʈɵựɕɦɛʂ џɵựɾ ʂƙɨɲ, ɾɛɱɨɲƋɨɲɠ џɵự ϣɦџ ɨʈ'ʂ ɛʂʂɛɲʈɨɑƚ ʈɵ ɓɛ ϼɾɛʂɛɲʈ, ʈɵ ʈɦɛ ƚɵɲɠ ɲɨɠɦʈʂ, ϣɦɛɾɛ ʂƚɛɛϼ ʄɑɨƚʂ ʈɵ ɑɾɾɨʋɛ, ƚɛɑʋɨɲɠ џɵự ɕɵɲʂựɱɛ ϣɨʈɦ ɑɲӝɨɛʈџ, ƚɵɲɛƚɨɲɛʂʂ, ɵʋɛɾʈɦɨɲɠƙɨɲɠ ɑɲƋ ʄɛɑɾ. ɾɛɠɑɾƋƚɛʂʂ ɵʄ ϣɦɑʈ ɱɑџ ɕɵɱɛ, ɑƚϣɑџʂ ɾɛɱɛɱɓɛɾ, ʈɦɑʈ џɵự ɑɾɛ ƚɵʋɛƋ. ☆.。.:* - *:.。.☆ 7. џɵự ɑɾɛ ɲɵʈ ɑ ʄɑɨƚựɾɛ, ϳựʂʈ ɓɛɕɑựʂɛ џɵự'ɾɛ ʄɨɲƋɨɲɠ ɨʈ Ƌɨʄʄɨɕựƚʈ ʈɵ ɓɛ ϼɾɵƋựɕʈɨʋɛ. џɵự ϣɨƚƚ ɑƚϣɑџʂ ɦɑʋɛ ʈɦɛ ɕɦɑɲɕɛ ʈɵɕɑʈɕɦ ựϼ ɑɲƋ ʈɾџ ɑɠɑɨɲ. ɓựʈ ʄɵɾ ɲɵϣ ʈɑƙɛ џɵựɾ ʈɨɱɛ. ☆.。.:* - *:.。.☆ 8. ʂʈɵϼ ɑɓɑɲƋɵɲɨɲɠ џɵựɾʂɛƚʄ. ๑۞๑,¸¸,ø¤º°`°๑۩ - ๑۩ ,¸¸,ø¤º°`°๑۞๑
Straighten out Stand with your back pressed against the wall and place your feet 30cm apart and 10cm away from the wall. Sink down Slowly bend your knee(s) and slide down the wall by 45cm, making sure your-middle back is touching the wall. Push back up Return to the start; keep your lower back on the wall as long as possible. Walk away with your head held high. And it can be as simple as lying on the floor with your knee(s) bent, using two or three books as a headrest (staying in this position for 10 minutes can rid you of shoulder cramps,) or rolling your head(s) forward to improve your posture. Inch your way to success.
AGES 2020 Update 2012 old 2018 former rec. Under 25 No screening Pap test every 3 years Pap test every 3 years Age 25‒29 HPV test every 5 years (preferred) , HPV/Pap cotest every 5 years (acceptable) or Pap test every 3 years (acceptable) Pap test every 3 years Pap test every 3 years Age 30‒65 HPV test every 5 years (preferred) or HPV/Pap cotest every 5 years (acceptable) Pap test every 3 years (acceptable) or HPV/Pap cotest every 3 years (preferred) or Pap test every 3 years (acceptable) Pap test every 3 years, HPV test every 5 years, or HPV/Pap cotest every 5 years Over 65 + No screening if a series of prior tests were normal No screening if a series of prior tests were normal No screening if a series of prior tests were normal and not at high risk for cancer
Do need the pap smear test if a virg!n and/or not s*xual active? You may not necessarily require, unless... You want to plan on having offspring To check for as*ault (such as ab*se) A family relation has had female reproductive cancer if contemplating feticidal abort1on If getting some reproductive apparatus if any of the above applies to you, the circumstances might be different regarding whether or not you as a virg!n should get one if you're not active The pap smear test only checks for cancers caused by the hpv transmitted virus which is transmitted vía such contact If you're not virg!n you may have hpv (said cancer causing virus, which the pap checks you for) dormant in your system
2020 Update 2012 old 2018 former rec. Ages <25 No screening Pap test every 3 years Pap test every 3 years Age 25‒29 HPV test every 5 years (preferred) , HPV/Pap cotest every 5 years (acceptable) or Pap test every 3 years (acceptable) Pap test every 3 years Pap test every 3 years Age 30‒65 HPV test every 5 years (preferred) or HPV/Pap cotest every 5 years (acceptable) Pap test every 3 years (acceptable) or HPV/Pap cotest every 3 years (preferred) or Pap test every 3 years (acceptable) Pap test every 3 years, HPV test every 5 years, or HPV/Pap cotest every 5 years Age 65 + No screening if a series of prior tests were normal No screening if a series of prior tests were normal No screening if a series of prior tests were normal and not at high risk for cancer
Adrenal Gland Tumor(Pheochromocytoma) Anosmia( Loss of Smell) Athletes Foot( Tinea Pedis) Bad Breath(Halitosis , Oral Malodor) Bedwetting(Enuresis) Bile Duct Cancer(Cholangiocarcinoma) Blackheads(Comedones) Bleedingnose(Nosebleed / Epistaxis) Blepharospasm - Eye Twitching(Eye Twitching - Blepharospasm) Bulging Eyes(Eye Proptosis | Exophthalmos) Cephalgia(Headache) Cheilitis | Chapped Lips Conjunctivitis( Pink Eye) Dry Skin(Xerosis) Fasciculations(Muscle Twitching) Fever(Pyrexia) Gallstones(Cholelithiasis) Herpangina (Painful Mouth Infection)(Mouth Blisters) Itchy Skin(Pruritus) Kinetosis(Travel Sickness / Sea sickness | Space sickness / Motion Sickness) Nervous Tic(Trigeminal Neuralgia) Ringworm(Tinea / Dermatophytosis) Singultus(Hiccups , Hiccoughs , Synchronous Diaphragmatic Flutter (SDF)) Smelly Feet(Bromodosis) Sneezing(Sternutation) Stiff Neck(Neck Pain / Cervicalgia) Stomach Flu(Gastroenteritis) Strabismus|Squint Utricaria(Hives) Uveitis(Eye Inflammation) Xerostomia(Dry Mouth)
What to say: “I know my body and I know something is not right." "I know this is different for me and I really need your help.” "I appreciate your expertise." Try to engage the doctor as a partner, but be firm. Express that you appreciate the doctor’s expertise, but emphasize that you know yourself. Bottom line: Don’t stop asking questions and keep speaking up until you get the answers that you need. In short, it’s all about framing. You need to suggest that someone else is making you ask them about whatever it is you want to bring up. This approach shifts the focus onto a third party, which helps doctors lower their defenses. If they think medical suggestions from patients are inane, you’re just feigning agreement with them. It effectively puts you on the same side as the doctor ⁠— the two of you against one. Or just get another opinion before deciding w/ them.
confusion, or being unable to think with your normal level of clarity and may result in poor decision-making. delirium, your thoughts are confused and illogical or being confused and having disrupted attention delusions, or believing things even if they’re false agitation, or feelings of aggressiveness and restlessness hallucinations, or seeing or hearing things that aren’t there The medical term for fainting is syncope, but it’s more commonly known as “passing out.” A fainting spell generally lasts from a few seconds to a few minutes. Feeling lightheaded, dizzy, weak, or nauseous sometimes happens before you faint. Some people become aware that noises are fading away, or they describe the sensation as “blacking out” or “whiting out.” Even mild head injuries can lead to a concussion. This can cause you to have memory issues and confusion. Most of the time, if you have a concussion, you may not remember the events that led to the injury.‌ Seizures can also cause memory problems. Sometimes, directly after a seizure, you can enter a state of post-ictal confusion. This means you may be confused and not remember what happened directly before the seizure or what you did after the seizure happened. Generally, your memory of those events will come back within 5-30 minutes, once the post-ictal state is over. A blackout from intoxication is due to a brain malfunction. Your brain stops saving the things you do as memories. You may act normally and do things like socialize, eat, drive, and drink. But your brain is impaired and does not record your memories sufficiently during this time. What Are the Signs? Symptoms can vary. Some people become quiet and withdrawn, while others get nervous and upset. They may: Struggle to focus Seem groggy, like they can’t wake up all the way Mumble or say things that don’t make sense Not recognise you or know where they are A full recovery usually takes a few minutes. If there’s no underlying medical condition causing you to faint, you may not need any treatment.
𝑡ℎ𝑖𝑛𝑔𝑠 𝑖 𝑤𝑎𝑛𝑡 𝑡𝑜 𝑚𝑎𝑛𝑖𝑓𝑒𝑠𝑡 𝜗𝜚 ✦ dry, sunny weather. it’s been raining for literal months every single day where i live! enough! ✦ seeing snow. it doesn’t snow where i live, so a bonus would be travelling somewhere nice ✦ my hair growing all the way down to my midriff ✦ receiving really great news out of the blue ✦ witchbrook and haunted chocolatier being released ✦ a healthy sleep schedule and sleeping well ✦ cute comfy clothes for winter ✦ a baby pink stanley cup ✦ more floral patchwork bedding ✦ being ridiculously lucky. always getting away with everything lucky. finding hundreds on the ground lucky. winning every giveaway ever lucky ✦ being able to live a slow, cozy life ✦ everything about me and my life being extremely aesthetically pleasing
I've been bulimic for 3 years. I was crying as I went to go purge, when my little brother grabbed my hand and asked if he could read me a story. One hour later, I found myself asleep in his bed; he was laying on the ground praying for God to "make me happy and healthy again." Joshie, your LGMH. May 4th, 2010, 2:12 PM
What’s disabilities? Being disabled can have various meanings. Physical disabilities are usually more visible. Even so, it might not be readily apparent. One individual can have more than one disability. But it’s not by choice, even in an elective amputation, mental disorders, ptsd vía warfare, etc. Some disabilities are more invisible, if internal or having to do with mentality. No matter what disability, it’s important to not have unreachable standards whilst at the same time not be patronising. Some disabilities are from congenital, meaning they were born with it or had their whole life. Some disabilities are acquired later in life such as an external injury they got.
| ̄ ̄ ̄ ̄ ̄ ̄ ̄ ̄ ̄ ̄ ̄| | I love my friends a lot, | | I just suck at talking | | to them regularly | |___________| (\__/) || (•ㅅ•) || /   づ
owlet: i think it’s importaпt to acknowledge that there is a contingent of doctors who have been… uh… coasting ever since med school ended. here’s a quick crash c̀ourse in telling them apart competent doctor: recognises that your sympt0ms sound familiar but also realises that the illness is outside the scope of their expertise, so they give you a referral incompetent doctor: doesn’t recognise your sympt0ms, chalks it all up to a m3ntal health and/or weıght prxblem and refuses any follow-up care competent doctor: stays up to date on the latest research in their field, is interested in sharing newly-discovered ınformαtıon with you incompetent doctor: maintains the absolute minimum amount of knowledge to not have their licence revoked competent doctor: approaches their patients with good faith incompetent doctor: assumes all patients are deceptive and have ulterior motives competent doctor: recognises crying and other overt paın sympt0ms as unacceptable and tries to resolve your paın any way they’re able incompetent doctor: ignores paın and either refuses to attempt to treat yours or willingly worsens it during a treatment by ignoring your reactions competent doctor: realises they don’t have all the answers, isn’t intimidated by the thought that you attend other doctors incompetent doctor: views their patients as income-generators and feels personally insulted when you attempt to leave their practise competent doctor: recognises all their patients are people; will be transparent about your treatment and speak to you with advanced and specific terminology if you demonstrate that you úndèrständ incompetent doctor: views patients as a sub-class of people, justifies lying to patients as “for their own goo͠d” (via intp-fluffy-robot) Jan 08, 2022
https://tttake.hatenablog.com/entry/2020/11/12/%28-phobia%29_%E6%81%90%E6%80%96%5B%E7%97%87%5D%E3%81%AE%E7%A8%AE%E9%A1%9E%E3%81%A3%E3%81%A6%E3%80%81%E3%81%A9%E3%82%8C%E3%81%8F%E3%82%89%E3%81%84%E6%9C%89%E3%82%8A%E3%81%BE%E3%81%99%E3%81%8B%EF%BC%9F_
Info tips for practitioners w/ autism and/or sensitivities First, thank you for caring. Not trying to question your expertise in health. Now, Autism is a spectrum. It’s not something one can turn off. It’s not a choice. Most of us are not trying to be demanding. If any thing, we’re afraid of being seen as childish, picky, high maintenance, bossy, rude, etc. We can easily get overwhelmed. We want to compromise with you. If we ask for another nurse to do something or if we know we cannot handle a procedure without certain accommodations, it’s not personally attacking against you. You have the power to provide the care and provide us any options; individuals know their own personal tolerance and needs. We do not ever want to start arguments. We do not want to inconvenience you over something, as we do not feel entitled. Having sensitivities not by choice, as it is more than inconvenience but also painful. We always feel when you do your best. We’re both human, autistic or not. It is not a choice.
https://www.spectrumnews.org/features/deep-dive/unseen-agony-dismantling-autisms-house-of-pain/
https://www.wikihow.com/Interpret-Autistic-Body-Language
⚫ South African astronomer Danie du Toit gave a lecture on how death can strike anyone, at any time. Upon the completion of this lecture, du Toit popped a mint candy into his mouth. It slid into the back of his throat, promptly causing him to choke to death. ⚫
Here are the common factors that can cause fqtigue and lethargy: Physical exertion. Prolonged or excessive physical activity can lead to fqtigue as the body’s energy reserves become depleted and muscles become fatigued. Sleep deprivation. Lack of sufficient sleep or poor sleep quality can result in fatigue, as the bødy and brain do not have adequate time to rest and rejuvenate. Medical conditions. Various medical conditions such as anemia, thyroid disorders, chronic paın, and infections can contribute to fqtigue by affecting the body’s physiological processes and energy production. Medications. Certain medications, such as those used for paın management, sedatives, and some antidepressants, may have fqtigue as a side effect. The client’s cognitive impairment, characterized by difficulty focusing, maintaining attention, and processing information, can significantly impact their task performance and decision-making abilities. The client may display increased irritability, mood swings, or emotional instability. These emotional changes can be a result of the phүsical and mental strain associated with fqtigue. Fqtigue can lower the client’s ability to cope with and manage stressors, making them more susceptible to feeling overwhelmed or emotionally drained.
There is no one-size-fits-all approach for autism Understand that every autistic person is different. Tailor treatment to the individual's needs. For example, one autistic person may have excellent self-care skills and above-average school performance, but need sensory integration therapy and social skills training. Another might be highly social but unable to care for herself and in need of counseling for depression.
Expect different bødy language. Autistic people don't always make eye contact, sit still, or look at the person they are listening to. However, that doesn't mean they aren't paying attention. It's helpful to be direct, so they don't get confused about your intentions. Here are some examples of things you could say: "Do you want to hold hands?" "How about a kíss?" "Hey, I'm behind you. Want a hug?" (Some autistic people startle easily when touched from behind.) Autistic people might be uncomfortable with certain types of to͠uch and ıntımate, because of sensory issues. To find out what works for them, just ask. Having a clear conversation is easy for many autistic people, and you'll get a clear sense of what they like. Be clear about your own thoughts and feelings. Picking up on body language can be difficult work for an autistic person, and they might not realize what's going on, or guess completely wrong. If you want them to know your feelings, the easiest way is to express them out loud. "I'm sorry I snapped at you. I'm a little on edge today because of my dad coming. You did nothing wrong." "I wish you would have told me earlier about Amy's math meet. I would like to have rearranged my schedule so that I could be there for her." "It hur͘t my feelings when you said that my beard looked like a hipster beard." Be prepared for them to show and experience emotions differently. They may not understand their own feelings (alexithymia), and thus act less emotional than others (e.g. not appearing to grieve when family members dıe, even though they're very upset). This does not mean that they aren't experiencing emotions. Autistic people may react with a problem-solving approach: they see that you are upset, and they are determined to fix it so you can be happy. They may not realize that you don't want advice, just a listening ear. Autistic people may appear emotionless, even when they are experiencing deep emotions.
https://www.legalmatch.com/law-library/article/what-is-a-medical-lawyer.html
https://rockymountainada.org/news/blog/5-tips-managing-sensory-needs-healthcare-settings
A girl in my class is Autistic We were playing volleyball in P.E one day and she wanted to serve. Everyone cheered for her even though the ball barely rose above her head My classmates' kindness GMH. Jan 4, 2015 at 11:00am by Anonymous
https://www.verywellhealth.com/why-we-drool-in-our-sleep-3015103
https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/ableism
Tue June 22nd, 2010 at 9:39pm I work with Autistic children every week. I work with a boy who has never spoken to me. Today he looked me straight in the eye and said “Thank you, Samantha” I cried so hard. He GMH
‧ ゚。⋆ * ⋆. ౨ৎ ‧ ゚。⋆ * ⋆. ౨ৎ ‧ ゚。⋆ * ⋆. ౨ৎ ‧ ゚。⋆ * it has gotten better before and it will again ☆ ‧ ゚。⋆ * ⋆. ౨ৎ ‧ ゚。⋆ * ⋆. ౨ৎ ‧ ゚。⋆ * ⋆. ౨ৎ ‧ ゚。⋆ *
hurt/comfort (fandom slang) A genre of fan fiction in which a character receives comfort from another after or while suffering injury, illness, or a traumatic experience. H/C stories appeal to readers in different ways. While genres for these stories range from drama to mystery, many stories are classified by their authors as romances or as “hurt/comfort” stories. Hurt/comfort is a fanwork genre that involves the physical pain or emotional distress of one character, who is cared for by another character. A great trope if you want to bring two characters closer together, or if you want to show how deep their relationship goes.
Sleepıng on your side or back will help alleviate neck paın, according to Harvard Health. If you're on your back, you'll want a rounded pillow under your neck for support. If you're on your side, you'll also want a pillow directly under your neck for support so your spine stays neutral. There are a couple of sleeping options if you have ear paın. The Cleveland Clinic advises you to sleep on the opposite side of the ear giving you trouble. You also want to sleep slightly elevated so that you're taking off any of the pressure from your inner ear. If you have a cøld or the flu, try sleeping on your back but with your head propped up. This can help keep your sinuses from becoming more congested than they probably are and can help you rest easier. According to Keck Medicine of USC, the best sleeping position for lower back paın is to lie on your back so your spine stays neutral. For lower back paın specifically, it can also help to use a pillow under your knees so that your legs aren't pulling on your spine. For those who wake up in the morning with hip paın or who find their hip paın exacerbated by the way they're sleepıng, try sleepıng on your back. You can also sleep on the opposite side of the hip that's giving you trouble, the Center for Spine and Orthopedics suggests. You should also put a pillow between your knees to take some pressure off your joints. Back sleepıng and side sleepıng can both help with knee paın, though back sleepıng is generally more recommended. If you're sleepıng on your back, the Arthritis Foundation recommends placing pillows under your knees to take any pressure off. If you choose to sleep on your side, place a pillow between your knees. Sleepıng on your back can help with perıods paın. This position, especially with a pillow under your knees, takes the pressure off your stomach and organs, as well as your back — all of which can help ease cramping.
Children with autism exhibit a higher general and anxietʏ, due to altered sensory sensibilities. Autism or autistic disorder is a severe developmental disability that is characterised by an impairment in mutual social interactions, communication skills, and repetitive patterns of behaviours. They can also show an increased sensitivity to sounds, light, odours, and colours. The attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) was the most common disorder associated with the autistic group (71%) and the epilepsy with the control group (52%) (P < 0.089) It's important for the clinicians to know how to manage these affecting patıents in developmental age, ensuring an adequate and minimally invasive management using a prompt approach, when possible. So, a good communication can help to establish trust and build needed cooperation throughout the visit and treatment. All patıents in developmental age, especially with health disorders, need experienced doctors who know how to face promptly tr4uma under general anaesthesia, if possible. Moreover, a parent-reported questionnaire method would also help overcome this deficiency, provided that the parents remember all past tr4uma events of their children. Respondents often cited conflict between understanding the additional needs for successful treatment of autistic patıents and a lack of resources to implement support strategies. Despite this, some were positive about making the necessary modifications to support autistic patıents. Professionals should adapt their practises to meet the needs of their autistic patıents. Autism is a developmental condition associated with social communication difficulties, and the presence of rigid, repetitive behaviours and atypical sensory sensitivities. As such, the nature of procedures and the treatment environment may prove a particularly challenging area for individuals on the autistic spectrum. In particular, sensory atypicalities may pose a barrier to treatment. Many autistic individuals are hypersensitive to a multitude of stimuli such as bright lights, noise and touch. Further autism-specific challenges include communication difficulties between practitioner and patient, which has been reported to be a key element in failed or unpleasant visits for autistic adults. Given the bidirectional nature of communication, the practitioner clearly plays a crucial role in overcoming this area of challenge. Autistic people have reported significant difficulties in accessing adequate care. Five main themes emerged from these responses: (1) understanding individual needs, (2) the key role of communication, (3) the value of autism specific techniques; (4) a conflict between needs and resources and (5) positive and rewarding work. To ensure successful treatment, the individual needs of each patient needs to be taken into consideration, as it affects each client differently. Given the variability in needs and preferences of autistic people, an overreliance on personal experiences may lead to professionals offering 'one-size-fits-all' accommodations, consequently producing more discomfort for the patıents. It was encouraging, however, to see a number of respondents in the current study flag up an understanding of this individuality, and the need for a tailored approach. Indeed, a considerable number of respondents reported not being aware of any techniques available to reduce possible discomfort in autistic patıents. Autism (congenital or acquired) and symptoms are not a chøice.
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https://www.wikihow.com/Respect-Autistic-People
See both the person and the disability. On one hand, not seeing the person may lead you to introduce them as "my autistic friend," stereotype them, or treat them like a child. On the other, refusing to acknowledge the disability and not accommodating their needs is also unhelpful. Strike a balance by treating their differences as natural, and overall unremarkable. Be clear about how you feel and what you want. Autistic people may not pick up hints or cues, so it's best to directly state your feelings. This helps eliminate confusion on both ends, and that way if the autistic person has upset you, they have the opportunity to make amends and learn from it. Warning: In most cases, people with autism are unable to cope when under pressure, so don't pressure them. Ask questions about how you can be accommodating and helpful. Get insight on how to relate to this person by talking with them about what it is like for them in particular to live as an autistic person. You may find that they want to share and can tell you lots of useful information that will help you to relate to them better. When applying this information, be sure to consider your autistic loved one as an individual, and remember that each step won't always apply to each person.
⁉️*️꩜
disability and autism are not your aesthetics. just stop. 🤨
The following link https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-018-05112-1 if read it shows Hans Asperger’s involvement w/ Nasi propaganda promoting problematic ideals calling autistics as psychopaths and deemed unfit in
https://psychcentral.com/autism/conditions-associated-with-autism
July 1996 . Twins can be conjoined at the: Abdomen (omphalopagus). Chest (thoracopagus). Top of head down to the belly button, facing each other (cephalopagus). Head only (craniopagus). Pelvis, facing each other (ischiopagus). Pelvis, side-to-side (parapagus). Rump-to-rump (pygopagus). Vertebral column (rachipagus). Generally, parapagus are conjoined at the upper chest. Parapagus, united laterally, always share a conjoined pelvis with one or two sacrums and one symphysis pubis. Dithoracic parapagus is when the two chests are separated, and the fusion is confined to the pelvis and abdomen. Dicephalic parapagus is if there is the union of the entire trunk but not the heads. The heart, liver, and diaphragm are fused, but there is a duplication of the respiratory tract and upper digestive tract; the viscera organs are fused. There are two arms, two legs, and two complete vertebral column and spinal cord. The number of limbs varies from 4 to 7, rarely with four legs. Generally, each lung is present in a separate lung cavity. The fusion of lungs is very rare. The alignment of the conjoined pelvis is diagnostic-one complete pelvic ring, with a single anterior pubic symphysis, and with two laterally fused sacral bones, and predominantly only one rectum. Ischiopagi are united ventrally extending from the umbilicus down to a sizeable conjoined pelvis with two symphyses pubis and two sacrum. Craniopagus can be united at any portion of the skull except at the face and the foramen magnum. Pygopagus varieties are joined dorsally; sharing the sacrococcygeal and perineal regions, sometimes even involving the spinal cord. Rachipagus twins are united dorsally above the sacrum. The union may also include the occiput. The cephalopagus varients are fused from the umbilicus to the top of the head. The pelvis and lower abdomen are usually not fused. Thoracopagus are united face-to-face from the upper thorax down till the umbilicus. Omphalopagus are primarily United at the umbilical region aligned face to face. The pelvis is not united. The pure parapagus is two heads, two hands, two legs, two hearts and two pairs of lungs. Conjoined twins are classified on the basis of the union's site, with the suffix pagus meaning fixed or fastened. The twins can have four (tetrapus), three (tripus), or two (bipus) legs. Cephalopagus: The twins often have a fused thorax in addition to a fused head. The single fused head may have two faces (janiceps) Cephalothoracopagus twinning is characterized by the anterior union of the upper half of the body, with two faces angulated variably on a conjoined head. The anomaly is occasionally known as janiceps, named after the two-faced Roman god Janus. The prognosis is extremely poor because surgical separation is not an option, in that only a single brain and a single heart are present and the gastrointestinal (GI) tracts are fused. Craniopagus: The conjoined twins share the skull, meninges, and venous sinuses Ischiopagus: The twins may lie face to face or end to end Pygopagus: The twins are joined dorsally, sharing the sacrococcygeal and perineal regions Rachipagus: The twins generally have vertebral anomalies and neural tube defects. Thoracopagus: The twins lie face to face and share the sternum, diaphragm, upper abdomen wall, and liver and have an exomphalos
December 15, 2013 A Special Needs Family isn't always blood; it's the people in life who celebrate your joys, understand your pain, who love to see you smile, and those who wipe away the tears
https://www.pastelpalacetattoo.com/ Services: txttoo cover-ups & reworkings, Piercings, txttoo RATINGs 4.9 out of five Positive: Cleanliness, Professionalism, Punctuality, Quality, Value disability accessible, clinically professional, thorough after-care Piercings (done with sterile nxxdles not a piercing gvn) Lobe (single) - £15 Lobes (double) - £25 Tragus - £30 Anti-Tragus - £30 Rook - £30 Conch - £30 Daith - £30 Helix - £30 Eyebrow - £30 Lip piercing (single) - £40 Scaffold / Industrial - £40 Nose - £25 Septum - £35 Earl /Bridge - £40 Smiley - £40 Belly - £40 Resident Artists: Sam Sparkles Tattoos Faithful Piercing Made with love by the Pastel Palace team x 27 N Station Rd, Colchester CO1 1RE (Essex) United Kingdom, England CO1 1RE 07947 551877 Tues - Sat: 10:00am - 5:30pm Sun-Mon: Closed HOURS Monday Closed Tuesday 10 AM–6 PM Wednesday 10 AM–6 PM Thursday 10 AM–6 PM Friday 10 AM–6 PM Saturday 10 AM–6 PM Sunday Closed
For Employers w/ disabled workers If a person who has a disability wants to work they might have difficulty getting jobs. There are different types of disabilities to varying degrees. First, inform them the expectations of the job. Make sure they know how to do the job as you train. Give warnings (and explain why behind the warning) before resorting to termination, as some people might not under stand what they did wrong. Even if the disability is confidential, explain to coworkers not to give the employee a hard time, without divulging. Don’t touch the employee or their belongings (including any mobility aids) without asking them first. Allow the employee extra time if necessary so as to not overwhelm them. Monitor the surroundings to make sure no harassment takes place, possible barriers to accessibility, etc. Try not to get frustrated if they do something differently than what others might do, such as note reminders, etc.
💙 https://www.sensoryfriendly.net/barriers-to-healthcare-when-sensory-is-a-problem/ 💙
https://imgflip.com/gif/8jx41j
A quick look at the best at-home HPV tests Most affordable at-home HPV test: Everlywell HPV Test – Female Best HPV test with medical support: myLAB Box Home HPV Test Kit Best for women under 30: NURX Home HPV Test Kit Best for quick results: iDNA 🍑 However, some tests use a urine sample instead of a cervical
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r/TwoSentenceHorror 1 day ago RandomCedricplayz The saddest part about my deαth is that, for months prior, I had a goal to develop into a healthy and happy person. Despite my premature passing, I'm happy to know that, in the end, I was still born.
sympt0ms of migraine include: fqtigue nausea/vomıtıng digestive issues visual disturbances (auras) sensitivity to light and/or sound mood changes bra1n fog/cognitive changes ringing in the ears dizziness/vertigo numbness/weàkness on one sıde of the bødy list is NOT complete, but is a starting point.
Delirium is an acute neuropsychiatric syndrome characterized by rapid-onset confusion, altered consciousness, and impaired cognitive function. Clients have difficulty sustaining attention, problems in orientation and short-term memory, poor insight, and impaired judgment. The confused client may not completely understand what is happening. Altered consciousness ranging from hypervigilance to stupor or semicoma. Extreme distractibility with difficulty focusing attention. Disorientation to time and place. Impaired reasoning ability and goal-directed behavior. Disturbance in the sleep-wake cycle. Emotional instability as manifested by fear, anxıety, depressıon, irritability, anger, euphoria, or apathy. Misperceptions of the environment, including illusions and hallucinations. Automatic manifestations, such as tachycardia, sweating, flushed fac͘e, dilated pupils, and elevated bľood pressure. Incoherent speech. Impairment of recent memory. Lack of motivation to initiate and/or follow through with goal-directed or purposeful behavior Fluctuation in psychomotor activity (tremors, bødy movement) Misperceptions Fluctuation in cognition Increased agitation or restlessness Fluctuation in the level of consciousness Fluctuation in the sleep-wake cycl3 Hallucinations (visual/auditory), illusions Impaired awareness and attention Disorientation Dysphasia, dysarthria
Common signs and sympt0ms of cognitive impairment or disturbed thought process may include memory loss, confusion, disorientation, difficulty concentrating, impaired judgment, language difficulties, changes in behavior or personality, and problems with problem-solving and decision-making abilities. The following signs and sympt0ms characterize cognitive impairment: Memory impairment. Significant difficulty in retaining new information or recalling previously learned information. Cognitive disorientation. Altered perception of time, place, and person, often resulting in confusion about surroundings and events. Impaired attention and concentration. Difficulty focusing, sustaining attention, and staying engaged in activities. Executive dysfunction. Challenges in planning, organizing, and executing complex tasks result in difficulties with problem-solving and decision-making. Aphasia. Language impairments involve difficulties with speech production, comprehension, or word finding. Changes in behavior and personality. Observable alterations in mood, emotions, social interactions, or impulse control. Apraxia. Difficulty performing purposeful movements or using objects correctly despite intact motor function. Agnosia. Inability to recognize or identify objects, people, or familiar sensory stimuli. Disrupted visuospatial abilities. Impairments in perceiving and interpreting spatial relationships, depth perception, or object recognition. Psychomotor disturbances. Changes in motor activity, such as agitation, restlessness, or slowed movements. The following are the priorities for clients with cognitive impairment: Client safety. Cognitive impairment can affect balance and coordination, increasing the risk of falls. These clients may also wander and become disoriented, leading to risks to safety. Communication. Cognitive impairment can impair communication skills, leading to frustration and isolation. Impaired activities of daily living (ADLs). Cognitive impairment often affects the client’s ability to perform independently. Nutrition and hydration. cognitive impairment can lead to forgetfulness or difficulty eatıng and drinking independently. Prioritizing adequate nutrition and hydration to prevent malnutrition and dehydration is essential. The following are the common goals and expected outcomes: The client will maintain reality orientation and communicate clearly with others The client will recognize changes in thinking/behavior. The client will recognize and clarify possible misinterpretations of the behaviors and verbalization of others. The client will identify situations that occur before hallucinations/delusions. The client will use coping strategies to deal effectively with hallucinations/delusions. The client will participate in unit activities. The client will express delusional material less frequently. Dr*gs can have direct effects on the brain, or have side effects, dose-related effects, and/or cumulative effects that alter thought patterns and sensory perception. Cognitive alterations and deficits that are observed in substance us̀e disorders contribute directly and indirectly to the overall tremendous public health burden that these disorders place on society. The typical cognitive domains contributing to this understanding of addiction are attention, response inhibition, decision-making, and working memory (Ramey & Regier, 2018).
I Want to Help It was a beautiful morning when I woke up, the sun shining through and the wildlife up and about. I went for my morning stroll, taking my usual route. I stopped by the surface of the water, when I saw the most peculiar thing: a little girl… In there. Couldn’t she breathe? Why didn’t she come out? Panicking, I reached out and grabbed her arms, yanking her out of it and holding her close to me. She started to scream, but then seemed to be choking. I tried to calm her down. “Shh… Everything is fine, little one, I saved you! Relax! Breathe in!” But she wouldn’t. And soon, despite all my efforts, she went limp. Not again! I couldn’t understand. I had taken her out of that horrible, disgusting air, and into the safety of the water. What had I done wrong this time? Maybe my tentacles frighten them. Maybe I wasn’t gentle enough. Human children are so unpredictable. I’ll save one for real next time, I swear.
Saturday 20 October 2012 True Love SMS True Love SMS → ι ωιѕн ι ωαѕ υя вℓαηкєт,ι ωιѕн ι ωαѕ υя вє∂, ι ωιѕн ι ωαѕ υя ριℓℓσω υη∂єяηєαтн υя нєα∂,ι ωαηηα в αяσυη∂ υ,ι ωαηηα нσℓ∂ υ тιgнт, &αмρ; в тнє ℓυ¢ку ρєяѕση ωнσ кιѕѕєѕ υ gσσ∂ηιтє → υνє ωση му ℓυν ησω ι ℓυν υ.тнιѕ нєαят σƒ мιηє ι gινє 2 υ.ѕσ кєєρ ιт ѕαƒє αѕ ι нανє ∂σηє.ƒσя υ нανє 2 αη∂ ι нανє ησηє! → ι ∂σηт нανє тнє мєαѕєℓѕ, ι αм ησт ¢σηƒιηє∂ тσ вє∂, αѕρєяιη ωσηт нєℓρ ¢σz ι αιηт му нєα∂, ι ∂σηт нανє вα¢к α¢нє σя тнє ƒℓυ, ιтѕ мσяє ѕєяισυѕ...ι αм мιѕѕιη υ! → υℓℓ αℓωαуѕ вє мιηє 4 ησω &αмρ; 4єνєя.υℓℓ αℓωαуѕ вє мιηє 4 υ я му тяєαѕυяє.υℓℓ αℓωαуѕ вє мιηє ρℓєαѕє тєℓℓ мє ιтѕ тяυє.ρℓєαѕє вє мιηє 4єνєя ιℓℓ αℓωαуѕ ℓυν υ → тнєяє αяє тυℓιρѕ ιη му gαя∂єη,тнєяє αяє тυℓιρѕ ιη тнє ραяк.вυт ησтнιηg ιѕ мσяє вє вєαυтιƒυℓ тнєη συя тωσ ℓιρѕ мєєтιηg ιη тнє ∂αяк! → ι ℓσνє 3 тнιηgѕ! тнє ѕυη, тнє мσση αη∂ υ! тнє ѕυη ƒσя тнє ∂αу, тнє мσση ƒσя тнє ηιgнт αη∂ уσυ ƒσяєνєя! → ιƒ ι ∂ιє∂ σя тяανєℓℓє∂ ƒαя, ι\'∂ ωяιтє υя ηαмє ση єνєяу ѕтαя,ѕσ єνєяуσηє ¢συℓ∂ ℓσσк υρ &αмρ; ѕєє, ∂αт υ мєαη тнє ωσяℓ∂ 2 мє → ωαηтιη υ ιѕ єαѕу мιѕѕιη υ ιѕ нαя∂.ωιѕнιη υ ωαѕ ωιν мє ωяαρρє∂ υρ ιη му αямѕ.¢σηѕтαηтℓу тнιηк σƒ υ ωєη ωє я αραят.ινє gσт тнє ρα∂ℓσ¢к υ нαν тнє кєу тσ му нєαят → нσω ¢αη υ тєℓℓ тнє яαιη ησт 2 ƒαℓℓ ωєη ¢ℓσυ∂ѕ єχιѕт?нσω ¢αη υ тєℓℓ тнє ℓєανєѕ ησт 2 ƒαℓℓ ωєη тнє ωιη∂ єχιѕтѕ?нσω ¢αη υ тєℓℓ мє ησт 2 ƒαℓℓ ιη ℓσνє ωє υ єχιѕт? → α¢¢ι∂єηтѕ ∂σ нαρρєη.ι ѕℓιρ- ι тяιρ- ι ѕтυмвℓє- ι ƒαℓℓ &αмρ; υѕυαℓℓу ι ∂σηт ¢αяє αт αℓℓ.вυт ησω ι ∂σηт кησω ωнαт тσ ∂σ ¢σѕ ι ѕℓιρρє∂ αη∂ ƒєℓℓ ιη ℓσνє ωιтн υ → ℓσνє ιѕ ℓιкє α gσℓ∂єη ¢нαιη тнαт ℓιηкѕ συя нєαятѕ тσgєтнєя αη∂ ιƒ уσυ єνєя вяєαк тнαт ¢нαιη уσυℓℓ вяєαк му нєαят 4єνєя!χχχ → ωнєη тнє ηιgнт ¢σмєѕ, ℓσσк αт тнє ѕку. ιƒ уσυ ѕєє α ƒαℓℓιηg ѕтαя, ∂ση\'т ωση∂єя ωну, נυѕт мαкє α ωιѕн. тяυѕт мє, ιт ωιℓℓ ¢σмє тяυє, вє¢αυѕє ι ∂ι∂ ιт αη∂ ι ƒσυη∂ уσυ → тяυє ℓυν ιѕ нαя∂ 2 ƒιη∂.ѕρє¢ιαℓ 1-1 σƒ α кιη∂.вυт тнє ℓυν ιηѕι∂є σƒ мє ιѕ тяυє.ιт αρρєαяє∂ тнє ∂αу ι мєт уσυ! → ιт тαкєѕ 2 тσ тαηgσ.2 тσ кιѕѕ.2 тσ тαℓк &αмρ; яємєηιѕ¢є.ѕσ мαηу gσσ∂ тнιηgѕ ¢υм ιη 2 &αмρ; σηє σƒ тнσѕє тнιηgѕ ιѕ мє &αмρ; υ! → υ ѕαу υ ℓυν мє &αмρ; ωαηт 2 нσℓ∂ мє тιgнт.тнσѕє ωσя∂ѕ яυη тняυ му нєα∂ ∂αу &αмρ; ηιтє.ι ∂яєαмт υ нєℓ∂ мє &αмρ; мα∂є мє ѕєє ∂αт 4єνєя 2gєтнєя ωє ωσσ∂ вє! → 1000 ωσя∂ѕ 1 ¢σσ∂ ѕαу.1000 ωιѕнєѕ 1 ¢σσ∂ ρяαу.1000 мιℓєѕ ℓєgѕ ¢σσ∂ ωαℓк.1000 ѕσυη∂ѕ α мσυтн ¢σσ∂ тαℓк.1000 тιмєѕ ιℓℓ в тяυє.1000 ωαуѕ 2 ѕαу ι ℓυν υ! → ινє gσт υя вαк &αмρ; υνє gσт мιηє.ιℓℓ нєℓρ υ συт ηєтιмє.2 ѕєє υ нυят 2 ѕєє υ ¢яу.мαкєѕ мє ωєєρ &αмρ; ωαηηα ∂ιє.ιℓℓ в яιgнт нєяє тιℓ ∂ єη∂.¢σѕ υя му ℓυν &αмρ; му вєѕтƒяιєη∂ → уσυ ¢αη ƒαℓℓ ƒяσм α вяι∂gє, уσυ ¢αη ƒαℓℓ ƒяσм αвσνє, вυт тнє вєѕт ωαу σƒ ƒαℓℓιηg, ιѕ ƒαℓℓιηg ιη ℓσνє! → тнєяє αяє 3 ѕтєρѕ тσ нαρρу нαρριηєѕѕ: 1 уσυ. 2 мє. 3 συя нєαятѕ 4 єтєяηιту! Posted by Kiran Bele at 21:53
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