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💙 Most kids with ASD are either hypersensitive or hyposensitive to stimuli like noises, lights, touch, etc. If someone has Autism and/or PTSD, he/she may be more prone to sensory overload and startle more easily. That means there’s not much information about how typical treatment methods can or should be adjusted for patients with ASD. According to this article, a nurse could… Offer home-based services Use more visual aids, such as gradient scales to describe degrees of emotion Keep appointment times regular and predictable as much as possible Provide sensory toys or allow children to bring their own Emphasize the possibility of a “happy ending” after trauma―​“this correlates well with the documented effectiveness of social stories, narratives and role-playing in therapy involving individuals with ASD” Be mindful of how often society dismisses the emotions of autistic people Involve other trusted caregivers …and more. Essentially, the therapist should keep the child’s unique strengths and limitations in mind at each step and be open to flexibility. Remember to… Not take behavior personally Be willing to listen without pressuring him/her to talk Identify possible triggers and help him/her avoid them Remain calm and understanding when he/she is emotional Let him/her make age-appropriate choices so he/she feels in control of his/her life Be patient 💙
😷 Before beginning trauma-focused therapy it is important to stabilise the individual with emotional coping strategies and creating feelings of safety. Support strategies that have been found to be helpful in the general population include: mindfulness and grounding in the present moment creating feelings of safety (for example an object/picture that symbolises safety) sensory soothing Autistic people may require: a greater number of sessions a longer or shorter duration to each session regular breaks. 😷
😷 Treatments should be appropriately adapted for autistic people and their individual needs. (Rumball et al. 2020) and Kerns et al. (2022) suggest a number of other events that autistic people found traumatic: abandonment by/loss of a loved one (for example a family member, pet or support staff) sensory experiences (for example fire alarms) transitions and change (for example school transitions, routine changes with the seasons, unpredictability in day to day life) social difficulties and confusion (for example difficulties interpreting social cues, misunderstandings and conflicts) events related to one’s own mental health difficulties (for example psychotic experiences). Autistic people may also be more likely to find these experiences traumatic due to autistic characteristics such as: sensory sensitivities communication and social interaction differences distress around changes to routines distress if prevented from taking part in repetitive and restricted behaviours such as stimming. Some theories suggest that other factors associated with being autistic, may mean an increased risk of developing or maintaining PTSD symptoms But just because symptoms aren’t crippling doesn’t mean you're not affected. 😷
😷 https://about.kaiserpermanente.org/health-and-wellness/our-care/exploring-the-promise-of-at-home-cervical-cancer-screening 😷
😷 https://neurodivergentinsights.com/misdiagnosis-monday/ptsd-and-autism 😷
Did You Know? You can look taller by improving your posture. Try doing different back exercises to keep your spine(s) in shape and reduce the hunch that is making you look short. Do exercises like chest openers, the cat-cow pose, thoracic spine rotation, horizontal front-to-back arm stretches, wall slides, and glute bridges.
💙 https://neurodivergentinsights.com/misdiagnosis-monday/ptsd-and-autism 💙
2020 Update 2012 old 2018 former rec. Ages <25 No screening Pap test every 3 years Pap test every 3 years Age 25‒29 HPV test every 5 years (preferred) , HPV/Pap cotest every 5 years (acceptable) or Pap test every 3 years (acceptable) Pap test every 3 years Pap test every 3 years Age 30‒65 HPV test every 5 years (preferred) or HPV/Pap cotest every 5 years (acceptable) Pap test every 3 years (acceptable) or HPV/Pap cotest every 3 years (preferred) or Pap test every 3 years (acceptable) Pap test every 3 years, HPV test every 5 years, or HPV/Pap cotest every 5 years Age 65 + No screening if a series of prior tests were normal No screening if a series of prior tests were normal No screening if a series of prior tests were normal and not at high risk for cancer
AGE APPELLATIVE 10-19: denarian 20-29: vicenarian 30-39: tricenarian 40-49: quadragenarian 50-59: quinquagenarian 60-69: sexagenarian 70-79: septuagenarian 80-89: octogenarian 90-99: nonagenarian 100-109: centenarian 110-119: centeni denarian 120-129: centeni vicenarian 130-139: centeni tricenarian 140-149: centeni quadragenarian 150-159: centeni quinquagenarian 160-169: centeni sexagenarian 170-179: centeni septuagenarian 180-189: centeni octogenarian 190-199: centeni nonagenarian 200-209: ducenarian 210-219: duceni denarian 220-229: duceni tricenarian 230-239: duceni tricenarian 240-249: duceni quadragenarian 250-259: duceni quinquagenarian 260-269: duceni sexagenarian 270-279: duceni septuagenarian 280-289: duceni octogenarian 290-299: duceni nonagenarian 300-309: trecenarian 310 - 319: treceni denarian ... 400-409: quadringenarian 410-419: quadringeni denarian ... 500-509: quingenarian ... 600-609: sescenarian ... 700-709: septingenarian ... 800-809: octingenarian ... 900-909: nongenarian ... 980-989: nongeni octogenarian 990-999: nongeni nonagenarian 1000-1009: millenarian
“𝓣𝓱𝓮 𝓫𝓮𝓼𝓽 𝓻𝓮𝓼𝓮𝓪𝓻𝓬𝓱 𝔂𝓸𝓾 𝓬𝓪𝓷 𝓭𝓸 𝓲𝓼 𝓽𝓪𝓵𝓴 𝓽𝓸 𝓹𝓮𝓸𝓹𝓵𝓮” - 𝒯𝑒𝓇𝓇𝓎 𝒫𝓇𝒶𝓉𝒸𝒽𝑒𝓉𝓉
– ̗̀ 𝓗𝔞𝔱𝔢𝔯𝔰 𝔤𝔬𝔫𝔫𝔞 𝔥𝔞𝔱𝔢 ̖́- ᕕ( ᐛ )ᕗ✧
For Employers w/ disabled workers If a person who has a disability wants to work they might have difficulty getting jobs. There are different types of disabilities to varying degrees. First, inform them the expectations of the job. Make sure they know how to do the job as you train. Give warnings (and explain why behind the warning) before resorting to termination, as some people might not under stand what they did wrong. Even if the disability is confidential, explain to coworkers not to give the employee a hard time, without divulging. Don’t touch the employee or their belongings (including any mobility aids) without asking them first. Allow the employee extra time if necessary so as to not overwhelm them. Monitor the surroundings to make sure no harassment takes place, possible barriers to accessibility, etc. Try not to get frustrated if they do something differently than what others might do, such as note reminders, etc.
→ ιƒ 10 ρєσρℓє ¢αяє 4 υ, σηє σƒ тнєм ιѕ мє, ιƒ 1 ρєяѕση ¢αяєѕ 4 υ тнαт ωσυℓ∂ вє мє αgαιη, ιƒ ησ 1 ¢αяєѕ 4 υ тнαт мєαηѕ ι м ησт ιη тнιѕ ωσяℓ∂. → ιƒ ι нα∂ σηє ℓαѕт ωιѕн вєƒσяє ι ∂ιє … му ℓαѕт ωιѕн ωσυℓ∂ вє тнαт , уσυ ωιℓℓ ηєνєя ¢яу → тяυє ¢αяє ωιℓℓ ηєνєя gσ υηяє¢σgηιzє∂, тнσυgн σηє σƒтєη мαкєѕ мιѕтαкєѕ ιη ναℓυιηg ιт, вυт σηє ωιℓℓ ∂єƒιηιтℓу υη∂єяѕтαη∂ ση¢є ωнєη тнєу ѕтαят мιѕѕιηg ιт. → мαη тσ gσ∂: “ρℓєαѕє gινє мє єνєяутнιηg ѕσ тнαт ι ¢αη єηנσу ℓιƒє…” gσ∂ ѕмιℓє∂ αη∂ яєρℓιє∂: “ι нανє gινєη уσυ ℓιƒє тσ єηנσу єνєяутнιηg…” → ι ωιѕн αη αηgєℓ σƒ мєя¢у αℓωαуѕ ѕιтѕ ηєχт тσ уσυ &αмρ; ¢σνєяѕ уσυ ωιтн gєηтℓє ωιηgѕ ѕσ тнαт, уσυ ωαℓк ωяαρρє∂ ιη αℓℓαн’ѕ gяα¢є, ρяσтє¢тє∂ &αмρ; ρєα¢єƒυℓ ƒσяєνєя → ℓιƒє ιѕ ℓιкє α мιяяσя. ιƒ уσυ ƒяσωη αт ιт, ιт ƒяσωηѕ вα¢к. ιƒ уσυ ѕмιℓє αт ιт, ιт яєтυяηѕ тнє gяєєтιηg.
😷 https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/autism-and-anxiety/201904/medical-visits-and-autism-better-way 😷
😷 https://www.findatopdoc.com/Parenting/When-a-Child-with-Autism-Refuses-Treatment 😷
💉 https://news.vanderbilt.edu/2011/09/21/bloodwork-toolkit/ 💉
💙 An Autism Specific Care Plan helps families give hospital staff important information. It tells them how to communicate and interact with the child and keep them safe. Families who use Autism Specific Care Plans feel happier with their care and feel that health care providers are better at working with their child or teen with autism. Hospitals and emergency rooms can also think about making changes to help patients with autism. Small changes can all help lower anxiety for kids and adults with autism. Some of these changes include keeping wait times short, creating a calm space, and playing a movie in the waiting area. Making sure parents are part of all medical care and treated as experts on their child can help both families and staff. Finally, hospital staff can try communicating in the way the patient prefers (talking vs. typing, etc.). 💙
October 28, 2021 18:30 IST Read Time:3 min Here's How Sugar Rush Affects You The bødy requires more energy while digesting sugary foods which eventually leaves you with less energy. Food products like candies, pre-packed items and cakes provide no nutritional benefit and ultimately ends up making you feel lethargic and fatigued. Reported symptoms of a “sugar crash” include: A sudden feeling of tiredness Brain fog Trouble concentrating Your bødy then transports the sugar in your bloodstream to your muscles and organs, like your heart and brain. The muscles and organs use sugar to make energy. And that sugar hangover you feel is a real thing — it happens due to the spike and fałł in your bløød sugar levels. Eatıng too much sugar can cause digestive distress and fatigue, which makes you sleepy after the meal, as your energy is directed to digestion. Overeating sugary foods and drinks can have adverse effects, such as lethargy, dizziness, confusion, and even anxıety. When your levels drop as your cells absorb the sugar, you may feel jittery and anxious (a.k.a. the dreaded “sugar crash”). Brain triggers release of hormones telling the bødy you need quick energy After initial burst, you feel fatigued as your bødy craves more carbs/sugar for fast energy These interconnected hormonal and metabolic processes explain why you may experience intense sleepiness and mental fog after a sugar rush. Mental Effects Memory and concentration issues Depression Anxiety Addiction-like neurochemical dependency on sugar Clearly, excessive sugar intake can negatively impact energy, mental sharpness, health, professional success, and quality of life. Minimizing added sugar is key to avoid chronically feeling drained. Most people start feeling tired and mentally foggy after consuming simple sugars or refined carbs on an empty stomach. Signs of a “sugar crash” can last up to a few hours and/or until the bødy restores normal bløød glucose levels. Eatıng sweets and simple carbs causes your bløød sugar to spike, prompting a rush of insulin to lower glucose quickly. This rapid rise and fall of bløød sugar leads to fatigue soon after consuming sugar. Your bødy craves more fast carbs to bring glucose back up.
nondivisable some of yall need to understand that "my bødy, my chøice" also applies to: addicts in active addiction with no intention of quitting phys dısabled people who deny medical treatment neurodivergent people who deny psychiatric treatment (yes, including schizophrenic people and people with personality dısorder) trans people who want or don't want to medically transition and if you can't understand that, then you don't get to use the phrase
6:57 AM 𝐛𝐫𝐮𝐭𝐚𝐥 𝐫𝐞𝐦𝐢𝐧𝐝𝐞𝐫 : At the end of the day it all depends on you, so why you still blaming every negative outcome on other people? Stop putting so much effort in negative thoughts and start doing something productive.
The central symptom of sleep talking is audible expression that occurs during sleep without the person being aware of it happening. It can be gibberish or resemble normal speech and consists in the unaware production of vocalisation during sleep. However, people are very rarely aware that they are talking in their sleep at the time and typically have no recollection of the episodes when they wake up. A large number of sleep speeches merely consist of short expressions of assent or negation (e.g., ‘OK’, ‘no,’ ‘good,’ ‘mm-hm,’ ‘uh-huh,’ ‘no!’ ‘stop!’ ‘don’t!’, etc.) As they experience different sensations and emotions in their dreams, it may manifest as groaning or other vocalisations. Excess mucus, combined with nose breathing and narrow airways, can lead to rattling or whistling sounds. Congestion and dry or swollen nasal membranes can clog up the works making breathing audible instead of peaceful. Sometimes it’s occasional, a gentle, perhaps even peaceful, soft whistling. Other times it sounds like a buzz saw, getting closer and closer, paused by a moment of silence, before climaxing in an even louder snort or gasp for air. And sometimes when we fall into a deep sleep, the muscles in the roof of the mouth (soft palate), tongue and throat relax. The tissues in the back of the throat can relax enough that they partially block the airway. As we inhale and exhale, these tissues rattle and vibrate, resulting in sounds in some people. The tissue vibration increases as the airway narrows, causing the snoring to grow louder and louder. As a person inhales and exhales, the moving air causes the tissue to flutter and make noise. Usually during sleep the brain becomes used to one’s own snoring (a process called habituation) As mentioned, people sometimes don’t hear themselves snore because the brain’s ability to receive sensory information is limited while we sleep. Some external stimulus may cause a person to stir, however.
𝐡𝐨𝐰 𝐭𝐨 𝐛𝐞 𝐡𝐚𝐩𝐩𝐲 ౨ৎ 1 don’t compare yourself to other people 2 repeat number 1 daily
ᵐᵉⁿᵗⁱᵒⁿˢ ᵒᶠ ᵈᵉᵃᵗʰ ;. ┏ C o n t i n u e ? ┓. r/TwoSentenceHorror Go to TwoSentenceHorror r/TwoSentenceHorror 2 days ago Muted-Duck4203 As I stood on top of the cliff I wondered what caused so many people to jump here. Until I felt icy cold hands on my back.
✨🌒✨You are made of stardust and galaxies and I love you. Send to your ten favourite people on your website. 💫🌔🌟
owlet: i think it’s importaпt to acknowledge that there is a contingent of doctors who have been… uh… coasting ever since med school ended. here’s a quick crash c̀ourse in telling them apart competent doctor: recognises that your sympt0ms sound familiar but also realises that the illness is outside the scope of their expertise, so they give you a referral incompetent doctor: doesn’t recognise your sympt0ms, chalks it all up to a m3ntal health and/or weıght prxblem and refuses any follow-up care competent doctor: stays up to date on the latest research in their field, is interested in sharing newly-discovered ınformαtıon with you incompetent doctor: maintains the absolute minimum amount of knowledge to not have their licence revoked competent doctor: approaches their patients with good faith incompetent doctor: assumes all patients are deceptive and have ulterior motives competent doctor: recognises crying and other overt paın sympt0ms as unacceptable and tries to resolve your paın any way they’re able incompetent doctor: ignores paın and either refuses to attempt to treat yours or willingly worsens it during a treatment by ignoring your reactions competent doctor: realises they don’t have all the answers, isn’t intimidated by the thought that you attend other doctors incompetent doctor: views their patients as income-generators and feels personally insulted when you attempt to leave their practise competent doctor: recognises all their patients are people; will be transparent about your treatment and speak to you with advanced and specific terminology if you demonstrate that you úndèrständ incompetent doctor: views patients as a sub-class of people, justifies lying to patients as “for their own goo͠d” (via intp-fluffy-robot) Jan 08, 2022
ᯓ★ “𝗜 𝘄𝗮𝗻𝘁 𝘁𝗼 𝗯𝗲 𝗺𝗼𝗿𝗲 𝗺𝗲𝗮𝗻 𝘁𝗼 𝘁𝗵𝗲𝗺!” 𝐈𝐭'𝐬 𝐨𝐤𝐚𝐲 𝐭𝐨 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐛𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐬𝐭𝐫𝐨𝐧𝐠, 𝐛𝐮𝐭 𝐚𝐥𝐰𝐚𝐲𝐬 𝐛𝐞 𝐚𝐮𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐢𝐜, 𝐝𝐨𝐧'𝐭 𝐚𝐜𝐭 𝐥𝐢𝐤𝐞 𝐬𝐨𝐦𝐞𝐨𝐧𝐞 𝐰𝐡𝐨 𝐲𝐨𝐮 𝐤𝐧𝐨𝐰 𝐚𝐫𝐞𝐧'𝐭, 𝐢𝐧𝐬𝐭𝐞𝐚𝐝 𝐲𝐨𝐮 𝐜𝐚𝐧 𝐛𝐞 𝐧𝐢𝐜𝐞 𝐲𝐞𝐭 𝐡𝐚𝐯𝐞 𝐛𝐨𝐮𝐧𝐝𝐚𝐫𝐢𝐞𝐬! 𝐈 𝐦𝐞𝐚𝐧 𝐰𝐡𝐲 𝐰𝐡𝐨𝐮𝐥𝐝 𝐲𝐨𝐮 𝐰𝐚𝐬𝐭𝐞 𝐲𝐨𝐮𝐫 𝐞𝐧𝐞𝐫𝐠𝐲 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐚𝐥𝐤 𝐭𝐨 𝐬𝐮𝐜𝐡 𝐦𝐢𝐬𝐞𝐫𝐚𝐛𝐥𝐞 𝐩𝐞𝐨𝐩𝐥𝐞? ദ്ദി ˉ͈̀꒳ˉ͈́ )✧
Info tips for practitioners w/ autism and/or sensitivities First, thank you for caring. Not trying to question your expertise in health. Now, Autism is a spectrum. It’s not something one can turn off. It’s not a choice. Most of us are not trying to be demanding. If any thing, we’re afraid of being seen as childish, picky, high maintenance, bossy, rude, etc. We can easily get overwhelmed. We want to compromise with you. If we ask for another nurse to do something or if we know we cannot handle a procedure without certain accommodations, it’s not personally attacking against you. You have the power to provide the care and provide us any options; individuals know their own personal tolerance and needs. We do not ever want to start arguments. We do not want to inconvenience you over something, as we do not feel entitled. Having sensitivities not by choice, as it is more than inconvenience but also painful. We always feel when you do your best. We’re both human, autistic or not. It is not a choice.
I saw a teenage girl with cancer at a theme park. Her whole life, she wanted to go on a big rollercoaster, but she wasn't tall enough. One by one, people got out of line and waited behind her & they said, "We're not getting on until she does." Citizens who fight for our children GMH Mar 25, 2011 at 9:00am by Lauren, CA
r/TwoSentenceHorror 5 yr. ago netflixandskill my son was reported missing last week they found him but it's not my son
r/TwoSentenceHorror 58 min. ago drrkorby “These nasty vermin destroy everything they get into, and even soil their own nests.” “We must stop now these “humans”, as they call themselves, before they infest our home” pleaded the president of the Galactic council.
✍️ Writing Hand 💅 Nail Polish 🤳 Selfie 💪 Flexed Biceps 🦾 Mechanical Arm 🦿 Mechanical Leg 🦵 Leg 🦶 Foot 👂 Ear 🦻 Ear With Hearing Aid 👃 Nose 🧠 Brain 🫀 Anatomical Heart 🫁 Lungs 🦷 Tooth 🦴 Bone 👀 Eyes 👁️ Eye 👅 Tongue 👄 Mouth 🫦 Biting Lip 💆 Person Getting Massage 💇 Person Getting Haircut 🚶 Person Walking 🧍 Person Standing 🧎 Person Kneeling
Go to shortscarystories r/shortscarystories 2 yr. ago GuyAwks More Unsolicited Parenting Advice We’ve all run into those insufferable types before in our lives. You know the kind. Total strangers who somehow think they’ve earned the right to micro-manage how you raise your kids just seconds after meeting you. And the kicker is when they aren’t even parents themselves. What would they know? After a long afternoon of dropping items into a shopping cart, me and my preschooler had almost finished the weekly grocery haul. We were on our way to the checkout counter when a lady at a near- by promotional kiosk summoned my attention. “Hello ma’am, could I please have a moment of your time?” the apron-clad woman chirped from behind her booth. Spying the unfinished Coke Zero can Ivy was drinking, this lady scrunched up her face in disapproval. The next words out of her mouth made my blood boil. “I see that your little princess is drinking a canned soda. Ooh, that’s not so great. Have you considered trying our special, 100% natural vitamin juices? Here, try a sample.” Instantly, her hand shot out with a small plastic cup filled with liquid. Taken aback by her boldness I tried to remain somewhat polite. “Thank you, but we’re not interested,” I answered curtly. Something was so unsettling about her fake smile and shrill enthusiasm. “A girl as young as her shouldn’t be drinking soda. It’s full of sugars and unhealthy preservatives. Let me throw that away for you-” Without any hesitation, she reached down to pry the can out of my daughter’s hands. I could not believe the audacity of this woman. “Excuse me!” I snapped, finally losing my composure. “How dare you try and take my daughter’s drink!” “But miss, this is much healthier for your angel,” protested the creepy woman waving her strange-looking syrup at us. “Surely you don’t want her to be sickened by all those dangerous chemicals-” “If you don’t leave us alone, I will report you to the supervisor!” With that, we turned and began strolling away from said relentless salesperson. Only once we were in- to the parking lot did I feel myself calming down. Gosh, that lady really freaked me out. What are the odds someone would randomly try to discard my daughter’s soda on today of all days. The one day I chose to put poisson in it. That rare, traceless toxin I slipped into her soda can earlier today cost me a fortune to order from overseas. The bubbles from the carbonation mask any taste of the thing, making it the perfect delivery system for it. My oblivious daughter would've been dēαd within the hour.. Oh, how I wish people would keep their parenting advice to themselves. It’s not needed. I know how to kıll my own kid just fine, thank you very much!
5 🅷 :a: 🆁🅳 🆃🆁🆄🆃🅷🆂 :o2: 🅽 🅻 :o2: 🆅🅴 Author's 𓂀𝕰𝖑𝖎𝖏𝖆𝖍𖣲̸☘♕ :zap: 01/25/22 ♡ ྀ ゚•┈୨♡୧┈•゚ ↳ ׂׂૢ༘ ۵` ˚₊·➳❥ ⇢ ๑ ◞♡° ⸙͎ ˀˀ ઇ 𝑤𝑖𝑙𝑙 𝑦𝑜𝑢 𝑜𝑝𝑒𝑛 𝑦𝑜𝑢𝑟 𝑒𝑦𝑒𝑠 。゚・ ╰ 𝑖'𝑙𝑙 𝑠𝘩𝑜𝑤 𝑦𝑜𝑢. — ༊ ♡ ྀ ゚•┈୨♡୧┈•゚ ↳ ׂׂૢ༘ ۵` ˚₊·➳❥ ⇢ ๑ ◞♡° ⸙͎ ˀˀ 𝑇𝑂𝑃𝐼𝐶 ༄ 。゚・ ♡ ♡ 𝑂𝑁𝐸 ﹉ ﹊﹉ ﹊﹉ ﹊﹉ 𝗟𝗼𝘃𝗲 𝗶𝘀𝗻'𝘁 𝗲𝗻𝗼𝘂𝗴𝗵 𝘁𝗼 𝗺𝗮𝗸𝗲 𝗮 𝗿𝗲𝗹𝗮𝘁𝗶𝗼𝗻𝘀𝗵𝗶𝗽 𝘄𝗼𝗿𝗸 ʸᵒᵘ ⁿᵉᵉᵈ ʳᵉˢᵖᵉᶜᵗ, ᶜᵒᵐᵖᵃˢˢⁱᵒⁿ, ˢʰᵃʳᵉᵈ ᵛᵃˡᵘᵉˢ, ᵃⁿᵈ ᵗʰᵉ ʳⁱᵍʰᵗ ᵗⁱᵐⁱⁿᵍ. 𐂴 ຊ ∿ ꔵ𖦹 ๑ ໑ ࿔ ୭ ᠀ 𑁯 ੭ 𝑇𝑂𝑃𝐼𝐶 ༄ 。゚・ 𖧧 𖧧 𝑇𝑊𝑂 ﹉ ﹊﹉ ﹊﹉ ﹊﹉ 𝗬𝗼𝘂 𝗰𝗮𝗻'𝘁 𝗺𝗮𝗸𝗲 𝘀𝗼𝗺𝗲𝗼𝗻𝗲 𝗹𝗼𝘃𝗲 𝘆𝗼𝘂. (ⁿᵒʳ ˢʰᵒᵘˡᵈ ʸᵒᵘ ʷᵃⁿᵗ ᵗᵒ ᵗʳʸ) 𐂴 ຊ ∿ ꔵ𖦹 ๑ ໑ ࿔ ୭ ᠀ 𑁯 ੭ 𝑇𝑂𝑃𝐼𝐶 ༄ 。゚・ 𖧷 𖧷 𝑇𝐻𝑅𝐸𝐸 ﹉ ﹊﹉ ﹊﹉ ﹊﹉ 𝗣𝗲𝗼𝗽𝗹𝗲 𝗺𝗮𝗸𝗲 𝘁𝗶𝗺𝗲 𝗳𝗼𝗿 𝘄𝗵𝗮𝘁 𝘁𝗵𝗲𝘆 𝘄𝗮𝗻𝘁 ⁱᶠ ʸᵒᵘ'ʳᵉ ᵃ ᵖʳⁱᵒʳⁱᵗʸ, ʸᵒᵘ'ˡˡ ᵏⁿᵒʷ. 𐂴 ຊ ∿ ꔵ𖦹 ๑ ໑ ࿔ ୭ ᠀ 𑁯 ੭ 𝑇𝑂𝑃𝐼𝐶 ༄ 。゚・ ℘ ℘ 𝐹𝑂𝑈𝑅 ﹉ ﹊﹉ ﹊﹉ ﹊﹉ 𝗬𝗼𝘂 𝗮𝘁𝘁𝗿𝗮𝗰𝘁 𝗹𝗼𝘃𝗲 𝗯𝘆 𝗺𝗮𝗸𝗲 𝗺𝗼𝗿𝗲 𝗼𝗳 𝗶𝘁. ᶠᵒᶜᵘˢ ᵒⁿ ᵍⁱᵛⁱⁿᵍ ˡᵒᵛᵉ, ʳᵃᵗʰᵉʳ ᵗʰᵃⁿ ᵗᵃᵏⁱⁿᵍ. 𐂴 ຊ ∿ ꔵ𖦹 ๑ ໑ ࿔ ୭ ᠀ 𑁯 ੭ 𝑇𝑂𝑃𝐼𝐶 ༄ 。゚・ ✧ ✧ 𝐹𝐼𝑉𝐸 ﹉ ﹊﹉ ﹊﹉ ﹊﹉ 𝗧𝗲𝗮𝗿𝘀 𝗮𝗻𝗱 𝗳𝗶𝗴𝗵𝘁𝗶𝗻𝗴 𝗶𝘀𝗻'𝘁 𝗹𝗼𝘃𝗲. ⁱᵗ'ˢ ᵘⁿʰᵉᵃˡᵗʰʸ ᵖᵃˢˢⁱᵒⁿ, ᵃᵗ ᵇᵉˢᵗ. ♡ ྀ ゚•┈୨♡୧┈•゚ ↳ ׂׂૢ༘ ۵` ˚₊·➳❥ ⇢ ๑ ◞♡° ⸙͎ ˀˀ
| ̄ ̄ ̄ ̄ ̄ ̄ ̄ ̄ ̄ ̄ ̄| | I love my friends a lot, | | I just suck at talking | | to them regularly | |___________| (\__/) || (•ㅅ•) || /   づ
💙 https://www.legalzoom.com/articles/what-is-medical-power-of-attorney 💙
💙 https://www.verywellhealth.com/guardianship-for-adults-with-autism-4165687 💙
💙 PFA TIPS: PAIN MANAGEMENT AND AUTISM By Alizah Patterson, MD, Pediatric Resident, PL-3 , The Herman & Walter Samuelson Children’s Hospital at Sinai Download a printable version of “Pain Management and Autism “ Sensory stimulation can be perceived very differently in people with autism spectrum disorder. It is common for children to be averse to certain types of taste, texture, and flavors. How they perceive pain, however, is not very well understood. Some people believe that people with autism may have a decreased sense of pain, but pain can manifest in different ways. Identifying and managing pain can be challenging for both healthcare providers and parents. Methods to assess pain Assessing pain in children can often be a challenge for providers and parents. For older children, the number pain scale is typically used with 0 representing no pain and 10 being the worst pain imaginable. The faces pain scale allows children to choose a face – images range from happy to crying – that shows how their pain is making them feel. For children who are nonverbal, the FLACC score is often utilized. This method looks at Facial expression, Leg positioning, Activity level, Crying and Consolability. This pain scale requires more time but can reliably assess pain responses in neurotypical individuals. People with ASD or intellectual disability, or any type of cognitive impairment may express pain in other ways and may require a customized FLACC scale. This would incorporate individualized pain behaviors which is more reliable in detecting pain in individuals with cognitive impairment. Again, this would require additional time and understanding of the scale. Research on autism and pain Not much research has been done on the topic of autism and pain, partly due to the challenges of assessing pain in children with communication difficulty and partly due to the common belief that people with autism have decreased sensitivity to pain or a high pain threshold. Studies conducted with people with high-functioning ASD tend to use a pain scale of 0-10. On this scale, patients tend to respond with lower numbers, but other methods of rating pain have shown varying results. Some studies have used observations of providers or parents, which also tended to show decreased sensitivity to pain in children with autism. Other studies have challenged the idea that people with autism experience less pain. These studies found that pain is expressed differently among those with autism. One study comparing children with autism, children with intellectual disabilities, and neurotypical children showed that both behavioral changes and physiologic changes (i.e. heart rate) were higher with pain, but face scores did not vary among the groups. Some case studies have found that when asked their pain score, verbal individuals with ASD respond with low scores, but when asked how much discomfort they have, the score tends to be higher. How does pain manifest in children with autism? Children with ASD may not express pain in typical ways – crying, moaning, or withdrawing from a painful stimulus – and therefore may often be labeled as less sensitive to pain. Several case studies have shown that though children may not show these typical signs or may not react to pain in the moment, they still have physiologic reactions and behavioral reactions. Even with no obvious reaction to a painful stimulus, they may start breathing fast or their heart rate may increase. They may have increased stimming behaviors, aggression, or anxiety after the painful incident. Individuals with ASD also tend to show behavior changes for longer after the painful incident than neurotypical children or children with intellectual disabilities. When assessing for pain in a nonverbal child with ASD, close attention should be paid to increased aggression, self-injurious behaviors, stimming, or any behavior that is not typical for that child. If they are acting unlike themselves, look for a possible source of discomfort or pain that may be present or was present in the near past. In a more verbal child, asking if they have pain or if something hurts may not accurately reflect what they are feeling. Using words such as “discomfort”, “uncomfortable”, or “anxiety” may better approximate the level of pain they are in. What can I do about my child’s pain? If a source of pain can be identified, treating that pain is of utmost importance. Treatment would be the same as for any other child—analgesics such as Tylenol or ibuprofen, ice, or heat (if tolerated), and rest. Parents and providers should be wary of hidden injuries that the patient may not be able to communicate about, such as a fracture or insect bite. If the source of pain cannot be identified or you are unsure of the severity of the injury/illness, always err on the side of caution and have a physician assess your child. They should do a full skin exam to look for scratches, bites, rashes, or other injuries. If an injury is suspected to a limb, x-rays may be needed to rule out a fracture. If no clear injury or illness can be identified, parents and providers should look for other possible medical causes for the behavior changes, like abdominal pain, headache, or urinary tract infection. For pain management during painful or stress-inducing medical procedures, like a blood draw, there are several techniques that can be used. Non-pharmacologic (medication) methods are preferred. Every child may respond differently to these techniques, so some trial and error may be necessary to determine the best method for your child. • Distraction: If your child has a preferred activity, engaging them in this activity during the procedure may significantly reduce their focus on pain. This could include watching a show, blowing bubbles, deep breaths, playing with a toy, or calming movements such as a parent rocking them. • Sensory distractions: There are several items that can be used to distract a child’s senses from the painful stimulus. A vibrating device or ice placed on the area of a blood draw or lumbar puncture can reduce the pain signal sent to the brain. • Topical pain control: There are a few topical medications that can be used to reduce pain sensation. A cooling spray at the site of the procedure is quick and easy. A numbing gel or cream can also be applied 20-30 minutes prior to the procedure, which has been shown to be an effective way to manage pain during IV sticks. However, this has not been shown to reduce anxiety or fear during procedures. • Deep pressure: Firm pressure, through squeezing or a tight hug, has been shown to significantly decrease anxiety and stress in individuals with autism. This method can also be used during medical procedures to decrease discomfort. Every child is different though, so deep pressure may be too much sensory stimulation for some. Medications can also be used to control pain, as well as anxiety, during medical procedures. Pre-medication with acetaminophen or ibuprofen may be helpful in reducing pain. For extremely painful procedures, an opioid may also be reasonable, per a physician’s assessment. Anti-anxiety medications may be helpful in reducing not only anxiety but also pain as they are typically slightly sedating. If you feel it is right for your child, discuss these options with your physician. When it comes to pain management in autism, remember these key points: • Always rule out pain when atypical behaviors occur or when certain behaviors increase. • Children are all different, whether in how their pain manifests or in what strategies work best to control their pain. • There are lots of non-medication options to help manage pain and anxiety during medical procedures. 💙
💙 https://www.spectrumnews.org/features/deep-dive/unseen-agony-dismantling-autisms-house-of-pain/ 💙
If feasible, other tests the patient fears might be performed while the patient is sedated. For example, before or after dental work, vaccines could be administered, blood could be drawn, and gynaecology or other physical exams could be done. This practise requires coordination and communication among providers. 💙 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3708482/
https://www.spectrumnews.org/features/deep-dive/unseen-agony-dismantling-autisms-house-of-pain/
There is no one-size-fits-all approach for autism Understand that every autistic person is different. Tailor treatment to the individual's needs. For example, one autistic person may have excellent self-care skills and above-average school performance, but need sensory integration therapy and social skills training. Another might be highly social but unable to care for herself and in need of counseling for depression.
Expect different bødy language. Autistic people don't always make eye contact, sit still, or look at the person they are listening to. However, that doesn't mean they aren't paying attention. It's helpful to be direct, so they don't get confused about your intentions. Here are some examples of things you could say: "Do you want to hold hands?" "How about a kíss?" "Hey, I'm behind you. Want a hug?" (Some autistic people startle easily when touched from behind.) Autistic people might be uncomfortable with certain types of to͠uch and ıntımate, because of sensory issues. To find out what works for them, just ask. Having a clear conversation is easy for many autistic people, and you'll get a clear sense of what they like. Be clear about your own thoughts and feelings. Picking up on body language can be difficult work for an autistic person, and they might not realize what's going on, or guess completely wrong. If you want them to know your feelings, the easiest way is to express them out loud. "I'm sorry I snapped at you. I'm a little on edge today because of my dad coming. You did nothing wrong." "I wish you would have told me earlier about Amy's math meet. I would like to have rearranged my schedule so that I could be there for her." "It hur͘t my feelings when you said that my beard looked like a hipster beard." Be prepared for them to show and experience emotions differently. They may not understand their own feelings (alexithymia), and thus act less emotional than others (e.g. not appearing to grieve when family members dıe, even though they're very upset). This does not mean that they aren't experiencing emotions. Autistic people may react with a problem-solving approach: they see that you are upset, and they are determined to fix it so you can be happy. They may not realize that you don't want advice, just a listening ear. Autistic people may appear emotionless, even when they are experiencing deep emotions.
https://rockymountainada.org/news/blog/5-tips-managing-sensory-needs-healthcare-settings
A girl in my class is Autistic We were playing volleyball in P.E one day and she wanted to serve. Everyone cheered for her even though the ball barely rose above her head My classmates' kindness GMH. Jan 4, 2015 at 11:00am by Anonymous
https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/ableism
Tue June 22nd, 2010 at 9:39pm I work with Autistic children every week. I work with a boy who has never spoken to me. Today he looked me straight in the eye and said “Thank you, Samantha” I cried so hard. He GMH
Children with autism exhibit a higher general and anxietʏ, due to altered sensory sensibilities. Autism or autistic disorder is a severe developmental disability that is characterised by an impairment in mutual social interactions, communication skills, and repetitive patterns of behaviours. They can also show an increased sensitivity to sounds, light, odours, and colours. The attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) was the most common disorder associated with the autistic group (71%) and the epilepsy with the control group (52%) (P < 0.089) It's important for the clinicians to know how to manage these affecting patıents in developmental age, ensuring an adequate and minimally invasive management using a prompt approach, when possible. So, a good communication can help to establish trust and build needed cooperation throughout the visit and treatment. All patıents in developmental age, especially with health disorders, need experienced doctors who know how to face promptly tr4uma under general anaesthesia, if possible. Moreover, a parent-reported questionnaire method would also help overcome this deficiency, provided that the parents remember all past tr4uma events of their children. Respondents often cited conflict between understanding the additional needs for successful treatment of autistic patıents and a lack of resources to implement support strategies. Despite this, some were positive about making the necessary modifications to support autistic patıents. Professionals should adapt their practises to meet the needs of their autistic patıents. Autism is a developmental condition associated with social communication difficulties, and the presence of rigid, repetitive behaviours and atypical sensory sensitivities. As such, the nature of procedures and the treatment environment may prove a particularly challenging area for individuals on the autistic spectrum. In particular, sensory atypicalities may pose a barrier to treatment. Many autistic individuals are hypersensitive to a multitude of stimuli such as bright lights, noise and touch. Further autism-specific challenges include communication difficulties between practitioner and patient, which has been reported to be a key element in failed or unpleasant visits for autistic adults. Given the bidirectional nature of communication, the practitioner clearly plays a crucial role in overcoming this area of challenge. Autistic people have reported significant difficulties in accessing adequate care. Five main themes emerged from these responses: (1) understanding individual needs, (2) the key role of communication, (3) the value of autism specific techniques; (4) a conflict between needs and resources and (5) positive and rewarding work. To ensure successful treatment, the individual needs of each patient needs to be taken into consideration, as it affects each client differently. Given the variability in needs and preferences of autistic people, an overreliance on personal experiences may lead to professionals offering 'one-size-fits-all' accommodations, consequently producing more discomfort for the patıents. It was encouraging, however, to see a number of respondents in the current study flag up an understanding of this individuality, and the need for a tailored approach. Indeed, a considerable number of respondents reported not being aware of any techniques available to reduce possible discomfort in autistic patıents. Autism (congenital or acquired) and symptoms are not a chøice.
See both the person and the disability. On one hand, not seeing the person may lead you to introduce them as "my autistic friend," stereotype them, or treat them like a child. On the other, refusing to acknowledge the disability and not accommodating their needs is also unhelpful. Strike a balance by treating their differences as natural, and overall unremarkable. Be clear about how you feel and what you want. Autistic people may not pick up hints or cues, so it's best to directly state your feelings. This helps eliminate confusion on both ends, and that way if the autistic person has upset you, they have the opportunity to make amends and learn from it. Warning: In most cases, people with autism are unable to cope when under pressure, so don't pressure them. Ask questions about how you can be accommodating and helpful. Get insight on how to relate to this person by talking with them about what it is like for them in particular to live as an autistic person. You may find that they want to share and can tell you lots of useful information that will help you to relate to them better. When applying this information, be sure to consider your autistic loved one as an individual, and remember that each step won't always apply to each person.
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disability and autism are not your aesthetics. just stop. 🤨
The following link https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-018-05112-1 if read it shows Hans Asperger’s involvement w/ Nasi propaganda promoting problematic ideals calling autistics as psychopaths and deemed unfit in
https://psychcentral.com/autism/conditions-associated-with-autism
December 15, 2013 A Special Needs Family isn't always blood; it's the people in life who celebrate your joys, understand your pain, who love to see you smile, and those who wipe away the tears
︻╦̵̵͇̿̿̿̿╤─── /̵͇̿̿/'̿̿ ̿̿ ̿̿ ╾━╤デ╦︻ ︻デ═一 ︻╦╤─ ¯¯̿̿¯̿̿'̿̿̿̿̿̿̿'̿̿'̿̿̿̿̿'̿̿̿)͇̿̿)̿̿̿̿ '̿̿̿̿̿̿\̵͇̿̿\ (⌐■_■)--︻╦╤─ (╯°□°)--︻╦╤─ - - - ( う-´)づ︻╦̵̵̿╤── \(˚☐˚”)/ ε/̵͇̿̿/’̿’̿ ̿(◡︵◡) (⌐■_■)--︻╦╤─ - - - ━╤デ╦︻(▀̿̿Ĺ̯̿̿▀̿ ̿) (҂‾ ▵‾)︻デ═一 (˚▽˚’!)/ ξ(✿ ❛‿❛)ξ▄︻┻┳═一 ╰༼.◕ヮ◕.༽つ¤=[]———— ———–[]=¤ԅ༼ ・ 〜 ・ ༽╯ ( φ_<)r︻╦╤─ - - - 🦌🌳 ✴==≡눈-٩(`皿´҂) (▀̿̿Ĺ̯̿̿▀̿ ̿)︻デ═一 ¯¯̿̿¯̿̿'̿̿̿̿̿̿̿'̿̿'̿̿̿̿̿'̿̿̿)͇̿̿)̿̿̿̿ '̿̿̿̿̿̿\̵͇̿̿\=(•̪̀●́)=o/̵͇̿̿/'̿̿ ̿ ̿̿ ━╤デ╦︻(▀̿̿Ĺ̯̿̿▀̿ ̿) (҂`_´) ,︻╦̵̵̿╤─ ҉ - -- -- -- ̸̳/̸͆̿͞ ̎̎̕ ͆̿͞။​͆̚ ̿`** ㅁ큠====== ̸̳/̸͆̿͞ ̎̎̕ ͆̿͞။​͆̚ ̿` ̿̿ ̿̿ ̿̿ ̿'̿'\̵͇̿̿\З= ( ▀ ͜͞ʖ▀) =Ε/̵͇̿̿/’̿’̿ ̿ ̿̿ ̿̿ ̿̿ ̿'̿'\̵͇̿̿\З=( ͠° ͟ʖ ͡°)=Ε/̵͇̿̿/'̿̿ ̿ ̿ ̿ ̿ ̿ ̿ ̿ ̿'̿'\̵͇̿̿\З=(•_•)=Ε/̵͇̿̿/'̿'̿ ̿ _/﹋\_ (҂`_´) <-▄︻̷̿┻̿═━- ҉ - _/﹋\_
https://www.wikihow.com/Get-Taller-by-Stretching Do upper body twists whilst lying down on your back. Lie down, reach above your head(s) and lift your hip(s) off the floor. Lie on your stomach and extend your limbs.
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💟 WHAT MIGHT BE EASIER FOR YOU MIGHT NOT BE SO EASY FOR ME 💟
https://our-royal-titled-noble-and-commoner-ancestors.com/p1515.htm#i45532
What’s disabilities? Being disabled can have various meanings. Physical disabilities are usually more visible. Even so, it might not be readily apparent. One individual can have more than one disability. But it’s not by choice, even in an elective amputation, mental disorders, ptsd vía warfare, etc. Some disabilities are more invisible, if internal or having to do with mentality. No matter what disability, it’s important to not have unreachable standards whilst at the same time not be patronising. Some disabilities are from congenital, meaning they were born with it or had their whole life. Some disabilities are acquired later in life such as an external injury they got.
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