Diabetescore Emoji Combos

Copy & Paste Diabetescore Emojis & Symbols 💉 Subcutaneous injections tend to be less painful

😷 If it’s a same day appointment without any preparation beforehand, still let them know any needs. Even if it’s not worth it to spend nearly an hour on preparing something especially for you, still let them know what might work best for you. If they need to use a speculum, ask for a small one! Even if they can’t use all their time convincing you of how convenient something might be, still tell them if you cannot do certain methods while feeling safe. Is there something on hand to relieve even a little pain? Can it be self administered at home? Can you sit in a different chair? If you cannot possibly resolve something as much as you’d like, ask for them to at least tell you what’s going on and ask how they might cope with similar sensations. Can an X-ray be done instead of a biopsy? If not, ask for them to take your concerns into account and go from there, such as a less invasive tool designed for the same purpose. Wear a long skirt or a dress so you can just pull it up rather than take your clothes off. You can also bring a jacket or different pants to change into. Take headphones and listen to music, explain you're nervous and would not like to hear much about what's going on but just to be told when they've started and when they've finished. Focus in on what you're listening to. Say if it’s your first time doing a certain procedure and mention your concerns. Acknowledge you understand people don’t necessarily enjoy it for fun. Knowing can make you less anxious. It’s definitely worth asking something like ‘I do find this procedure extremely painful, could you try with a X?’ The procedure is easier for them to perform if you’re not squirming around in pain so there’s no reason for them not to at least try. Pamper yourself. Count as you breathe. Breathe in 1-2-3-4. Breathe out 1-2-3-4. If the doctor's good, they'll keep you talking and talk to you for further distraction, and walk you through each step they take. Most of the time, certain tests don't take much longer than 30 seconds and afterwards they'll leave you alone so you can recover if you need it. Talk to them beforehand so they know you're anxious, and see what they can do to help you get through it. Knowing options are always open to you if you need it can help put you at ease. Knowing what certain tests feel like can make it go smoother and easier to manage. Mentally walk yourself through the procedure before it happens while doing slow breathing exercises - breath in for five counts and out for five (or longer) while walking yourself through what to expect with your eyes closed. If at any point you get nervous, keep breathing and open your eyes. Once comfortable, continue through the procedure and just keep breathing. Don’t dismiss true concerns so you can decide what might be best for you. Gather all available facts to make informed decisions with the medics. Discuss the procedure with the medic and what they will do and when it happens. While the procedure happens, ask them to explain what which thing it is they’re doing next and how it might feel. Tell them if at any point you express discomfort, they check in with you and do not proceed until you give them the green light. Make sure nothing is put in you if you have not consented to or understand the purpose of. It’ll help you stay in some control if you are allowed to say if you wanted to stop at any given time to get through it. Anyone could find any experience distressing, but one’s distress can be magnified by the facts of how they are autistic, traumatized, etc. Just like with any other condition, doctors should have to take into account a particular person in their office and adjust what they’re doing to meet the needs of said patient. Jot down in advance everything you want to discuss to know exactly why, when and how something is to be. Ask for details and mention anything. Think about the muscles in your legs as you close your eyes. Imagine you’re at home, or think of a show. Anything to make it seem less intimidating. Give them notes you’ve taken. Ask if you can pace. Even if you aren’t a child, you still may need the catering even if you understand what medics are for. Make kits. Ask them to listen to you and to take time with you to make it more comforting. Advocate as feedback. 😷
Tips 😷 Depending on the procedure, meet the one treating you to see if they are a good fit for you. If they seem nice and willing, find something where you can both agree to make it better for the both of you. If you can notify them ahead of time, mention your needs. “I have autism which might contribute to my discomfort. What can I bring to the clinic? Can I leave my pants on, or can I wear a skirt instead of having to undress? Can you prepare smaller medical tools? Do you have sedatives? Are numbing agents readily available? Do you have a room with an adjustable seat? What’s the best treatment for me? Are there other options to make it easier to get care?” Look up pictures of the place, visit it, read any rule policies and see if they can accommodate to getting special permission for certain aspects. Get a personalized treatment plan. Use telemedicine, an appointment over video, phone call or text chat, when available and appropriate. Ask about at home tests you can send. Tell your doctor about your worries. They might be able to help you address them.
💉 Subcutaneous injections tend to be less painful than intramuscular injections because the needles are smaller and do not have to push through as much tissue. 💉
Concerns to ask the doc if needed 😷 Although benefits can outweigh much, it’s still a worry. Even if it temporarily lasts a second, a person's pain should be taken into account. I’m not saying you should go under deep sedation just to get teeth cleaned, especially if you don’t need it. If you are having trouble tolerating certain exams, tell them to keep it in mind so the procedure can be easier on both of you. If you experience intense pain and find it hard to tolerate, request for ways to make it easier. Thank you for taking the time to care for me (be sure to show gratitude before, during and/or after) Can you explain the procedure to me? How long will it take? Can we count up or down to the number? Can you explain what you're doing as you begin to do it? Because it’s been hard in the past when X, so can we look at some techniques? Can I drink water before or during the procedure? Do you have a heat pack or ice pack nearby? I want to get it over with and I’d like it to be easy for both of us. If you have a distraction tool (like telling jokes) to use I’d still like to let you know about X knowing my concerns will still be taken into account. Can we talk beforehand and walk me through the procedure as it will happen, step by step? Do you have any non invasive ways to check for X? Can you do it another way instead? Do you have any smaller and/or softer instruments to get the job done? Can you apply something (like warmth, gel, etc.) to the instrument beforehand? Is there a way to get around it? Can I say if I wanted to stop (said procedure) during any time? Can I make informed decisions to decline X? When it comes to certain exams, I’ve sensory issues, trauma, etc. Do you know any breathing exercises or any methods to accommodate my specific needs? It’s not anything personal, it’s not distrust, but I want it to go easy for both of us. 😷
pls note the ai inflicts emotional damage (ᵕ—ᴗ—)
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Related Text & Emojis

🍑 https://www.mayoclinic.org/tests-procedures/pelvic-exam/about/pac-20385135 🍑
😷 https://lifehacker.com/what-your-pediatrician-should-and-shouldnt-do-during-a-1822524179 😷
😷 If it’s a same day appointment without any preparation beforehand, still let them know any needs. Even if it’s not worth it to spend nearly an hour on preparing something especially for you, still let them know what might work best. If they need to use a speculum, ask for a small one! Even if they can’t use all their time convincing you of how convenient something might be, still tell them if you cannot do certain methods while feeling safe. Is there something on hand to relieve even a little pain? Can it be self administered at home? Can you sit in a different chair? If you cannot possibly resolve something as much as you’d like, ask for them to at least tell you what’s going on and ask how they might cope with similar sensations. Can an X-ray be done instead of a biopsy? If not, ask for them to take your concerns into account and go from there, such as a less invasive tool designed for the same purpose. 😷
😷 Wear a long skirt or a dress so you can just pull it up rather than taking your clothes. You can also bring a jacket or different pants to change into. 😷
😷 Pamper yourself. Count as you breathe. Breathe in 1-2-3-4. Breathe out 1-2-3-4. If the doctor's good, they'll keep you talking and talk to you for further distraction walking you through each step they take. Most of the time, certain tests don't take much longer than 30 seconds and afterwards they'll leave you alone so you can recover if you need it. Talk to them beforehand so they know you're anxious and see what they can do to help you get through it. Knowing options are always open to you if you need them can help put you at ease.
Tips 💉 Depending on the procedure meet the one treating you to see if they are a good fit for you. If they seem nice and willing, find something where you can both agree to make it better for the both of you. If you can notify them ahead of time, mention your needs. “I have autism which might contribute to my discomfort. What can I bring to the clinic? Can I leave my pants on, or can I wear a skirt instead of having to undress? Can you prepare smaller medical tools? Do you have sedatives? Are numbing agents readily available? Do you have a room with an adjustable seat? What’s the best treatment for me? Are there other options to make it easier to get care?” Look up pictures of the place, visit it, read any rule policies and see if they can accommodate to getting special permission for certain aspects. Get a personalized treatment plan. Mention you’ve special needs regarding X. Use telemedicine, an appointment over video, phone call or text chat, when available and appropriate. Ask about at home tests you can send. Tell your doctor about your worries. They might be able to help you address them.
😷 Take headphones and listen to music, explain you're nervous and would not like to hear much about what's going on but just to be told when they've started and when they've finished. Focus in on what you're listening to.
Skin 🧴 Skin protects the insides of the body. Human skin can range from light peachy cream colour to dark brown depending on the amount of melanin produced. Sun exposure and genetics can also play a role. 🧴
Say if it’s your first time doing a certain procedure and mention your concerns. Acknowledge you understand people don’t necessarily enjoy it for fun. Knowing can make you less anxious. 😷 It’s definitely worth asking something like ‘I do find this procedure extremely painful, could you try with a X?’ The procedure is easier for them to perform if you’re not squirming around in pain so there’s no reason for them not to at least try.
💙 Most kids with ASD are either hypersensitive or hyposensitive to stimuli like noises, lights, touch, etc. If someone has Autism and/or PTSD, he/she may be more prone to sensory overload and startle more easily. That means there’s not much information about how typical treatment methods can or should be adjusted for patients with ASD. According to this article, a nurse could… Offer home-based services Use more visual aids, such as gradient scales to describe degrees of emotion Keep appointment times regular and predictable as much as possible Provide sensory toys or allow children to bring their own Emphasize the possibility of a “happy ending” after trauma―​“this correlates well with the documented effectiveness of social stories, narratives and role-playing in therapy involving individuals with ASD” Be mindful of how often society dismisses the emotions of autistic people Involve other trusted caregivers …and more. Essentially, the therapist should keep the child’s unique strengths and limitations in mind at each step and be open to flexibility. Remember to… Not take behavior personally Be willing to listen without pressuring him/her to talk Identify possible triggers and help him/her avoid them Remain calm and understanding when he/she is emotional Let him/her make age-appropriate choices so he/she feels in control of his/her life Be patient 💙
😷 Before beginning trauma-focused therapy it is important to stabilise the individual with emotional coping strategies and creating feelings of safety. Support strategies that have been found to be helpful in the general population include: mindfulness and grounding in the present moment creating feelings of safety (for example an object/picture that symbolises safety) sensory soothing Autistic people may require: a greater number of sessions a longer or shorter duration to each session regular breaks. 😷
😷 Treatments should be appropriately adapted for autistic people and their individual needs. (Rumball et al. 2020) and Kerns et al. (2022) suggest a number of other events that autistic people found traumatic: abandonment by/loss of a loved one (for example a family member, pet or support staff) sensory experiences (for example fire alarms) transitions and change (for example school transitions, routine changes with the seasons, unpredictability in day to day life) social difficulties and confusion (for example difficulties interpreting social cues, misunderstandings and conflicts) events related to one’s own mental health difficulties (for example psychotic experiences). Autistic people may also be more likely to find these experiences traumatic due to autistic characteristics such as: sensory sensitivities communication and social interaction differences distress around changes to routines distress if prevented from taking part in repetitive and restricted behaviours such as stimming. Some theories suggest that other factors associated with being autistic, may mean an increased risk of developing or maintaining PTSD symptoms But just because symptoms aren’t crippling doesn’t mean you're not affected. 😷
🔪☆°・*:.。.☆💉 ☆.。.:*・°☆✂️
Knowing what certain tests feel like can make it go smoother and easier to manage. Mentally walk yourself through the procedure before it happens while doing slow breathing exercises - breath in for five counts and out for five (or longer) while walking yourself through what to expect with your eyes closed. If at any point you get nervous, keep breathing and open your eyes. Once comfortable, continue through the procedure and just keep breathing. 😷
🍑 https://www.healthdirect.gov.au/blog/self-test-makes-cervical-screening-pap-smear-even-easier 🍑
😷 https://about.kaiserpermanente.org/health-and-wellness/our-care/exploring-the-promise-of-at-home-cervical-cancer-screening 😷
😷 https://www.health.gov.au/ministers/the-hon-ged-kearney-mp/media/pap-smears-can-be-replaced-by-do-it-yourself-cervical-cancer-tests 😷
🍑 https://www.health.gov.au/self-collection-for-the-cervical-screening-test 🍑
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😷 https://neurodivergentinsights.com/misdiagnosis-monday/ptsd-and-autism 😷
💙 https://neurodivergentinsights.com/misdiagnosis-monday/ptsd-and-autism 💙
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Why autistic people are like cats: - We are highly sensitive. - We don't like loud or sudden noises. - We are easily spooked and startled. - Especially because we are zoning out, like, all the time. - We love to be held and touched and petted and cuddled bUT ONLY IF IT WAS OUR IDEA! - We're picky eaters. - Easily distracted. - Solitary creatures. - Takes us a while to warm up to people and be comfortable around them. - Our idea of being "social" is just hanging around the vicinity or in the same room as other people but not necessarily interacting with them. - We are finicky, particular, meticulous creatures of habit and we have a comfort zone we will defend with our lives. - If we deem you worthy, you will be allowed into our comfort zone. - Gaining our love and trust is super rewarding because it is not easily done. Be flattered. - If you touch us unexpectedly we will flinch or jump. - We are awesome predators and get super intense about stuff one nickname for the ADHD gene is "the hunter gene") - We are cute and lovable and have a lot of personality. - Many autistic children love to feel enclosed and secure and so love secret hiding places and cubby holes (i.e., "if I fits, I sits") - We sometimes appear to freak out at nothing and scamper away for no reason but really it's because we can hear things you can't and some sounds bother us. - Because we have such hyper-sensitive senses, any snuggles you give us will be a million times more rewarding for you because you'll know and appreciate just how intensely we're enjoying them. - Please give us food or we will boop your nose in your sleep.
⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⠿⠿⠿⠿⠿⠿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿ ⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⡇⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⣿⣿⣿⡿⠛⠉⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠈⠙⠻⣿⣿⣿⡇⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⠟⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⣴⣿ ⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⡇⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⣿⠟⠉⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠙⢿⡇⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⣿⣿⣿⣿⠋⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⢀⣾⣿⣿ ⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⡇⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠋⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⣀⣠⣤⣤⣀⡀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠈⠃⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⣿⣿⡿⠃⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⢠⣿⣿⣿⣿ ⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⡇⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⣴⣾⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣶⡀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⣿⡿⠁⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⣰⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿ ⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⡇⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⡇⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⣼⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣤⣤⣤⣤⣤⡄⠃⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠟⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⢀⣼⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿ ⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⡇⠀⠀⠀⠀⢸⡇⠀⠀⠀⠀⢰⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⡇⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⢠⣾⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿ ⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⡇⠀⠀⠀⠀⢸⡇⠀⠀⠀⠀⠸⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⡇⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠁⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠈⢿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿ ⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⡇⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⡇⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⢻⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⠛⠛⠛⠛⠛⠃⡄⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⣆⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠻⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿ ⡇⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⢻⣿⣿⡇⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠙⢿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⠿⠁⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⣿⣦⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠘⢿⣿⣿⣿⣿ ⣧⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠈⠛⠋⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⣸⣄⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠉⠙⠛⠛⠉⠁⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⢀⡄⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⣿⣿⣷⡀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠈⠻⣿⣿⣿ ⣿⣆⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⣠⣿⣿⣧⣀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⣠⣾⡇⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⣿⣿⣿⣷⡄⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠙⣿⣿ ⣿⣿⣷⣄⡀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⢀⣠⣾⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣷⣤⣀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⢀⣠⣴⣿⣿⣿⡇⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣆⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠈⢻ ⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣶⣶⣶⣶⣶⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣶⣶⣶⣶⣶⣶⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿
SPORTS OFFERED The Allen Delegation currently supports: Aquatics (swim) Athletics Basketball Bocce Bowling Flag Football (no skills level at this time) Golf Power Lifting (weights) Soccer (futbol) ​Tennis Volleyball ​Unified Sports (doubles) Allen Special Olympics Delegation (ASOD)
😷 Keep a diary of the situations that make you feel anxious and note how you’ve reacted in each situation. This will help you identify potential triggers for your anxiety. 😷
😷 Remember that you are not alone and can discuss these issues with a trusted mental health provider. Exploring treatment options with a healthcare provider Exercising to reduce stress Setting realistic goals Breaking up large tasks into smaller ones Spending time with friends and family Confiding in trusted friends or relatives Seeking out comforting situations, places, and people Seeking out support from friends and family Finding a support group Learning to feel good about one’s actions in the face of danger Having a positive coping strategy Being able to act and respond effectively despite feeling fearful Medication and expectation management strategies may also be included in an overall treatment plan. 😷
😷 If you can, look for a trauma-informed healthcare provider, or a provider that has experience helping people who have experienced trauma. If your current provider doesn’t listen to your concerns or makes you uncomfortable, remember that you can absolutely seek out a different practitioner. 😷
💉 https://news.vanderbilt.edu/2011/09/21/bloodwork-toolkit/ 💉
😷 https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/autism-and-anxiety/201904/medical-visits-and-autism-better-way 😷
😷 https://www.findatopdoc.com/Parenting/When-a-Child-with-Autism-Refuses-Treatment 😷
💙 An Autism Specific Care Plan helps families give hospital staff important information. It tells them how to communicate and interact with the child and keep them safe. Families who use Autism Specific Care Plans feel happier with their care and feel that health care providers are better at working with their child or teen with autism. Hospitals and emergency rooms can also think about making changes to help patients with autism. Small changes can all help lower anxiety for kids and adults with autism. Some of these changes include keeping wait times short, creating a calm space, and playing a movie in the waiting area. Making sure parents are part of all medical care and treated as experts on their child can help both families and staff. Finally, hospital staff can try communicating in the way the patient prefers (talking vs. typing, etc.). 💙
Info tips for practitioners w/ autism and/or sensitivities First, thank you for caring. Not trying to question your expertise in health. Now, Autism is a spectrum. It’s not something one can turn off. It’s not a choice. Most of us are not trying to be demanding. If any thing, we’re afraid of being seen as childish, picky, high maintenance, bossy, rude, etc. We can easily get overwhelmed. We want to compromise with you. If we ask for another nurse to do something or if we know we cannot handle a procedure without certain accommodations, it’s not personally attacking against you. You have the power to provide the care and provide us any options; individuals know their own personal tolerance and needs. We do not ever want to start arguments. We do not want to inconvenience you over something, as we do not feel entitled. Having sensitivities not by choice, as it is more than inconvenience but also painful. We always feel when you do your best. We’re both human, autistic or not. It is not a choice.
For Employers w/ disabled workers If a person who has a disability wants to work they might have difficulty getting jobs. There are different types of disabilities to varying degrees. First, inform them the expectations of the job. Make sure they know how to do the job as you train. Give warnings (and explain why behind the warning) before resorting to termination, as some people might not under stand what they did wrong. Even if the disability is confidential, explain to coworkers not to give the employee a hard time, without divulging. Don’t touch the employee or their belongings (including any mobility aids) without asking them first. Allow the employee extra time if necessary so as to not overwhelm them. Monitor the surroundings to make sure no harassment takes place, possible barriers to accessibility, etc. Try not to get frustrated if they do something differently than what others might do, such as note reminders, etc.
🖤💙💛 / ⚡⚡⚡ / 🤍❤️💚
😷 https://theconversation.com/if-your-child-is-afraid-of-or-refusing-a-medical-procedure-heres-how-to-help-170923 😷
What’s disabilities? Being disabled can have various meanings. Physical disabilities are usually more visible. Even so, it might not be readily apparent. One individual can have more than one disability. But it’s not by choice, even in an elective amputation, mental disorders, ptsd vía warfare, etc. Some disabilities are more invisible, if internal or having to do with mentality. No matter what disability, it’s important to not have unreachable standards whilst at the same time not be patronising. Some disabilities are from congenital, meaning they were born with it or had their whole life. Some disabilities are acquired later in life such as an external injury they got.
😷 https://www.statnews.com/2020/02/25/adults-dont-need-booster-vaccinations-for-tetanus-diphtheria-study/ 😷
😷 https://www.sensoryfriendly.net/how-to-create-a-sensory-friendly-ambulance/ 😷
😷 https://kidsinpain.ca/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/Vaccine-Pain-Needle-Fear-Resources-v2-November-2021.pdf 😷
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❝ʰᵃᵗᵉ ᵗʰᵉ ˢᶤᶰ ˡᵒᵛᵉ ᵗʰᵉ ˢᶤᶰᶰᵉʳ❞
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| ̄ ̄ ̄ ̄ ̄ ̄ ̄ ̄ ̄ ̄ ̄| | I love my friends a lot, | | I just suck at talking | | to them regularly | |___________| (\__/) || (•ㅅ•) || /   づ
💙 https://www.verywellhealth.com/guardianship-for-adults-with-autism-4165687 💙
💙 PFA TIPS: PAIN MANAGEMENT AND AUTISM By Alizah Patterson, MD, Pediatric Resident, PL-3 , The Herman & Walter Samuelson Children’s Hospital at Sinai Download a printable version of “Pain Management and Autism “ Sensory stimulation can be perceived very differently in people with autism spectrum disorder. It is common for children to be averse to certain types of taste, texture, and flavors. How they perceive pain, however, is not very well understood. Some people believe that people with autism may have a decreased sense of pain, but pain can manifest in different ways. Identifying and managing pain can be challenging for both healthcare providers and parents. Methods to assess pain Assessing pain in children can often be a challenge for providers and parents. For older children, the number pain scale is typically used with 0 representing no pain and 10 being the worst pain imaginable. The faces pain scale allows children to choose a face – images range from happy to crying – that shows how their pain is making them feel. For children who are nonverbal, the FLACC score is often utilized. This method looks at Facial expression, Leg positioning, Activity level, Crying and Consolability. This pain scale requires more time but can reliably assess pain responses in neurotypical individuals. People with ASD or intellectual disability, or any type of cognitive impairment may express pain in other ways and may require a customized FLACC scale. This would incorporate individualized pain behaviors which is more reliable in detecting pain in individuals with cognitive impairment. Again, this would require additional time and understanding of the scale. Research on autism and pain Not much research has been done on the topic of autism and pain, partly due to the challenges of assessing pain in children with communication difficulty and partly due to the common belief that people with autism have decreased sensitivity to pain or a high pain threshold. Studies conducted with people with high-functioning ASD tend to use a pain scale of 0-10. On this scale, patients tend to respond with lower numbers, but other methods of rating pain have shown varying results. Some studies have used observations of providers or parents, which also tended to show decreased sensitivity to pain in children with autism. Other studies have challenged the idea that people with autism experience less pain. These studies found that pain is expressed differently among those with autism. One study comparing children with autism, children with intellectual disabilities, and neurotypical children showed that both behavioral changes and physiologic changes (i.e. heart rate) were higher with pain, but face scores did not vary among the groups. Some case studies have found that when asked their pain score, verbal individuals with ASD respond with low scores, but when asked how much discomfort they have, the score tends to be higher. How does pain manifest in children with autism? Children with ASD may not express pain in typical ways – crying, moaning, or withdrawing from a painful stimulus – and therefore may often be labeled as less sensitive to pain. Several case studies have shown that though children may not show these typical signs or may not react to pain in the moment, they still have physiologic reactions and behavioral reactions. Even with no obvious reaction to a painful stimulus, they may start breathing fast or their heart rate may increase. They may have increased stimming behaviors, aggression, or anxiety after the painful incident. Individuals with ASD also tend to show behavior changes for longer after the painful incident than neurotypical children or children with intellectual disabilities. When assessing for pain in a nonverbal child with ASD, close attention should be paid to increased aggression, self-injurious behaviors, stimming, or any behavior that is not typical for that child. If they are acting unlike themselves, look for a possible source of discomfort or pain that may be present or was present in the near past. In a more verbal child, asking if they have pain or if something hurts may not accurately reflect what they are feeling. Using words such as “discomfort”, “uncomfortable”, or “anxiety” may better approximate the level of pain they are in. What can I do about my child’s pain? If a source of pain can be identified, treating that pain is of utmost importance. Treatment would be the same as for any other child—analgesics such as Tylenol or ibuprofen, ice, or heat (if tolerated), and rest. Parents and providers should be wary of hidden injuries that the patient may not be able to communicate about, such as a fracture or insect bite. If the source of pain cannot be identified or you are unsure of the severity of the injury/illness, always err on the side of caution and have a physician assess your child. They should do a full skin exam to look for scratches, bites, rashes, or other injuries. If an injury is suspected to a limb, x-rays may be needed to rule out a fracture. If no clear injury or illness can be identified, parents and providers should look for other possible medical causes for the behavior changes, like abdominal pain, headache, or urinary tract infection. For pain management during painful or stress-inducing medical procedures, like a blood draw, there are several techniques that can be used. Non-pharmacologic (medication) methods are preferred. Every child may respond differently to these techniques, so some trial and error may be necessary to determine the best method for your child. • Distraction: If your child has a preferred activity, engaging them in this activity during the procedure may significantly reduce their focus on pain. This could include watching a show, blowing bubbles, deep breaths, playing with a toy, or calming movements such as a parent rocking them. • Sensory distractions: There are several items that can be used to distract a child’s senses from the painful stimulus. A vibrating device or ice placed on the area of a blood draw or lumbar puncture can reduce the pain signal sent to the brain. • Topical pain control: There are a few topical medications that can be used to reduce pain sensation. A cooling spray at the site of the procedure is quick and easy. A numbing gel or cream can also be applied 20-30 minutes prior to the procedure, which has been shown to be an effective way to manage pain during IV sticks. However, this has not been shown to reduce anxiety or fear during procedures. • Deep pressure: Firm pressure, through squeezing or a tight hug, has been shown to significantly decrease anxiety and stress in individuals with autism. This method can also be used during medical procedures to decrease discomfort. Every child is different though, so deep pressure may be too much sensory stimulation for some. Medications can also be used to control pain, as well as anxiety, during medical procedures. Pre-medication with acetaminophen or ibuprofen may be helpful in reducing pain. For extremely painful procedures, an opioid may also be reasonable, per a physician’s assessment. Anti-anxiety medications may be helpful in reducing not only anxiety but also pain as they are typically slightly sedating. If you feel it is right for your child, discuss these options with your physician. When it comes to pain management in autism, remember these key points: • Always rule out pain when atypical behaviors occur or when certain behaviors increase. • Children are all different, whether in how their pain manifests or in what strategies work best to control their pain. • There are lots of non-medication options to help manage pain and anxiety during medical procedures. 💙
💙 https://www.spectrumnews.org/features/deep-dive/unseen-agony-dismantling-autisms-house-of-pain/ 💙
If feasible, other tests the patient fears might be performed while the patient is sedated. For example, before or after dental work, vaccines could be administered, blood could be drawn, and gynaecology or other physical exams could be done. This practise requires coordination and communication among providers. 💙 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3708482/
💙 https://www.legalzoom.com/articles/what-is-medical-power-of-attorney 💙
https://www.forbes.com/sites/tarahaelle/2016/03/23/got-your-tetanus-shot-you-may-not-need-another-for-30-more-years/?sh=3b29aade6db3
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https://www.spectrumnews.org/features/deep-dive/unseen-agony-dismantling-autisms-house-of-pain/
𝑇ℎ𝑒 𝑏𝑒𝑠𝑡 𝑎𝑛𝑑 𝑚𝑜𝑠𝑡 𝑏𝑒𝑎𝑢𝑡𝑖𝑓𝑢𝑙 𝑡ℎ𝑖𝑛𝑔𝑠 𝑖𝑛 𝑡ℎ𝑒 𝑤𝑜𝑟𝑙𝑑 𝑐𝑎𝑛𝑛𝑜𝑡 𝑏𝑒 𝑠𝑒𝑒𝑛 𝑜𝑟 𝑒𝑣𝑒𝑛 𝑡𝑜𝑢𝑐ℎ𝑒𝑑 — 𝑡ℎ𝑒𝑦 𝑚𝑢𝑠𝑡 𝑏𝑒 𝑓𝑒𝑙𝑡 𝑤𝑖𝑡ℎ 𝑡ℎ𝑒 ℎ𝑒𝑎𝑟𝑡. -𝐻𝑒𝑙𝑒𝑛 𝐾𝑒𝑙𝑙𝑒𝑟
⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿ ⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⠿⢿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿ ⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⠿⠿⠿⢿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⠿⠛⠉⠀⠙⢛⣿⠟⠛⠃⠀⠀⠉⠙⠛⢿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿ ⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣟⣿⣿⣿⣿⡿⠋⠀⠀⠀⠈⠉⠉⠻⢿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⠟⠁⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠂⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠉⠻⢿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿ ⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⠿⠳⠛⠉⠉⠙⠛⠋⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠙⠻⣿⣿⣿⣿⡿⠁⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠠⠂⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠈⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠙⢿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿ ⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⡿⠃⠀⠀⢀⣀⡤⠀⠀⠈⢳⡀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠐⣄⠈⢿⣿⡿⠀⠀⢀⡀⠀⠀⠀⠀⣿⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⢷⡆⠀⠀⠀⠀⠙⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿ ⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⡁⠀⢠⠠⣯⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⣧⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⣆⠀⠀⢸⣆⠨⣿⣷⢒⡐⣌⢰⠇⣾⣿⣶⣏⠛⢲⣄⠀⣠⣶⢶⣿⣄⣦⢲⣾⣻⣀⣇⣠⠀⠀⣬⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿ ⣿⣿⣿⣿⡇⡄⢀⢌⠸⣿⢻⡄⠀⠀⠀⠀⢸⣆⣀⣠⣄⣄⣰⣦⡄⣿⢀⠸⣿⠀⢹⣿⣾⣛⣿⡘⢳⣿⣯⣹⣿⣵⣶⣿⣿⣯⣶⢬⣽⣿⣿⡴⢿⣈⣻⣹⡿⠀⣸⢣⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿ ⣿⣿⣿⣿⠈⠁⣸⣿⣿⣟⣾⣿⢣⣴⣀⣤⣼⣷⡶⣿⡟⣿⣻⣿⣲⣿⠻⣿⣿⡀⢸⣿⣿⣟⣿⣙⣦⢬⣹⡿⣏⣬⣽⣻⣿⣿⢿⣿⡛⡏⣭⣿⣼⣟⣯⠿⠀⣴⢋⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿ ⣿⣿⣿⣿⣆⠀⠞⣿⢹⣿⣷⣘⣿⣽⣿⣿⣷⣾⣿⣿⣿⣞⢻⣻⣿⣿⡛⢿⣿⣿⣤⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣥⣾⠿⣾⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣷⣞⡗⣛⣯⣿⣿⡟⠛⣤⠞⢡⣾⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿ ⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣦⡀⠈⠘⠻⣿⣽⣶⣻⠿⣿⣛⡛⡏⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣶⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⠀⠘⢻⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⡛⢾⣿⠟⢁⣤⣼⡃⣰⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿ ⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣷⣤⣀⠀⠘⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣾⡼⢿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⡿⣿⠋⣹⢿⣿⣿⣿⣿⡯⢿⣶⣦⣨⣟⡿⠿⢿⠿⢋⡿⣿⠁⢂⢾⡟⣾⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿ ⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣷⣄⣹⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣟⣀⡀⠻⢿⣿⣿⣿⣿⠿⠋⢫⣥⣿⢲⣯⣿⣿⠟⣿⣘⡿⠿⠟⢛⠿⢿⣭⣱⡼⢿⢛⣛⡿⢟⣥⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿ ⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣏⠻⢿⣿⣿⣿⣋⣼⣿⣿⣷⡟⢷⣬⣙⠀⠤⣀⣤⣿⣿⣾⣻⣿⣿⣾⣿⣰⣄⣒⣒⣊⣠⣾⣿⡿⡩⢉⣽⣟⣽⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿ ⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣄⢤⣻⣿⣽⡿⢿⣿⣞⠋⠀⠀⠀⣸⣿⣿⣿⡿⣿⣿⣿⣿⡽⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⡿⠿⡛⠛⢋⠁⠩⡿⣴⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿ ⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣾⡟⡹⣦⣰⣞⣚⣛⣡⣶⣾⣿⣿⡿⠋⢸⣷⣿⣿⣿⣿⣇⠸⢿⡶⠛⠛⠂⠁⠀⠀⣁⣤⣶⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿ ⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⡜⣜⠿⠿⣿⣿⣿⡿⠿⠿⠋⠀⠀⣸⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣮⣤⣐⣀⣀⣤⡾⠯⢵⣼⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿ ⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣄⡀⠰⢳⡶⣶⠲⠙⠂⠁⣀⣾⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣧⠞⠛⢛⣳⡿⠿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿ ⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣧⣀⡹⢿⣿⣀⣠⡴⢟⣻⣼⣿⢿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣟⣿⣿⣿⡿⠿⢿⢤⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿ ⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣶⣟⢻⣾⢿⣟⣯⠶⠿⣿⣿⣿⣿⡯⠿⣿⡛⢉⣉⠉⡛⢻⣿⣻⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿ ⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣟⢿⣿⣭⠷⠖⢿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣷⢾⣿⣿⣿⡿⠿⠿⠽⢟⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿ ⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣯⡷⢖⡒⢛⣿⣼⠿⠿⡿⡿⠿⠛⠷⢷⣶⣶⠶⣦⣤⣭⣙⣛⣿⡛⢯⣻⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿ ⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⡿⠿⣋⣤⡴⣛⣟⣿⣟⣉⣿⣄⣀⣆⡀⠀⣒⣻⣇⣭⣭⣭⣥⣄⣉⣻⣾⣻⣿⣿⣎⡝⣷⣟⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿ ⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣌⠋⣿⣯⣶⣾⣿⠿⠛⣩⣤⡶⠾⠿⢿⡺⡟⠻⣯⣼⣿⣿⣿⣯⣭⣉⣙⣫⣟⡛⢝⡳⣿⣿⣿⢻⣹⢿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿ ⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣽⠻⣿⠿⣿⣿⠿⠴⢛⣥⣶⣿⠿⢶⣶⣽⣷⣀⣀⣭⠿⠻⣾⠧⣿⣿⣿⡛⠿⢯⣟⡻⣾⡽⢿⡘⠻⡖⢹⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿ ⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣺⣶⣿⣿⢂⣴⢿⣷⣏⢁⣤⡾⠿⣻⣟⣻⣿⠿⢯⡀⡹⣷⣤⣭⡛⢿⣷⣬⡿⠿⣚⣷⣿⣿⠟⢿⢿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿ ⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣴⡟⣙⡗⢿⠫⠷⢚⢉⣴⣿⣿⣷⣾⠟⠛⠛⣷⣈⣿⣿⣾⣿⣯⡙⢿⣷⣦⣼⣷⣮⡿⢻⣿⣿⡎⣿⣺⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿ ⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣯⠁⢸⣟⢛⣤⡾⠁⣾⡿⢫⣿⣿⣿⣷⣿⢿⣿⣷⣾⣫⣭⣭⣷⢻⣶⣬⡛⢿⡍⣈⡤⣿⣿⣿⣿⡿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿ ⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⡀⢸⣧⢟⠁⣠⡾⣋⣴⣿⣿⣿⡷⠛⡏⣉⠛⣿⣿⣩⣭⣭⣩⣿⢉⣿⣿⣿⠟⠛⠛⣼⣿⣿⣯⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿ ⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣇⠈⣿⡾⢶⣿⡿⣿⡽⣟⣿⣿⣿⠿⠟⣿⣿⣿⡿⢋⣉⣉⠉⣿⣯⠿⣿⣦⣸⢾⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿ ⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⡄⢻⣡⡾⣫⡾⢋⣼⣿⣿⣷⣿⡿⡿⣿⠿⢿⣿⠛⠛⠛⢻⣿⡟⣷⣌⠚⠛⣿⣥⣿⣿⣿⡿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿ ⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⡇⠘⣯⣾⠋⣴⡿⢋⣷⣿⣿⣿⣿⣷⣿⣿⣿⣿⠿⠛⢿⠾⢿⢦⣙⠿⣷⣦⣤⣼⣻⣿⣿⣧⡯⢿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿ ⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣇⠀⢿⣡⣾⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣼⢿⣧⣀⣀⣼⣷⣼⣿⣿⣷⡷⠤⣿⣷⣾⣿⣿⣿⡅⣽⠇⠀⠍⡸⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿ ⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⡀⠂⢻⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣶⣯⣿⠋⢛⣿⣥⣤⣤⣼⣤⡾⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣷⣿⠀⠀⣴⣶⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿ ⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣁⠀⠀⣻⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣯⣿⠶⠿⠿⣿⣿⣏⠉⠉⢹⣿⠉⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣷⡚⢻⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿ ⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⡏⠛⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣧⣿⣲⣷⣶⣿⣿⠟⠛⡿⣟⢺⢾⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⡾⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿ ⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣧⢄⣹⡻⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⡿⣿⣳⣾⣶⣾⣿⣿⡼⣷⣯⣿⣪⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⡇⢹⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿ ⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⡾⡞⣇⠹⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⠿⣋⣥⣴⣼⢿⣷⣶⣿⣧⣤⣼⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣇⠰⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿ ⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣷⣹⡸⣆⢻⣿⡿⠛⠋⠉⢳⣿⣻⣭⣶⣾⣿⣿⣹⣹⡿⠛⠻⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⡤⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿ ⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣧⣳⡹⣖⢻⡇⠀⠀⠛⢸⣿⣿⣏⣽⣿⣿⣿⣿⣏⠚⣧⠀⠨⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⡟⡗⢿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿ ⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣧⢣⡽⣎⢧⠀⠀⠀⢠⣻⣿⣥⢾⣿⣿⣿⣿⣷⡾⢿⡆⠀⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⠁⣿⢸⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿ ⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣎⠂⢹⣎⣧⡶⠂⠈⠱⣿⣷⣻⣿⣿⣯⣿⢿⣔⡀⣧⣶⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣟⣠⡿⠺⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿ ⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣖⣀⣿⣊⣿⣿⣶⡟⢻⣾⣭⣿⣿⣿⢿⣿⣮⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⡟⢻⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿ ⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⡍⠛⣿⣿⣭⢸⣿⠄⠙⣯⣻⡿⢷⣶⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⡏⢡⢺⣽⡌⢿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿ ⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣾⣿⣿⢯⣻⠿⣷⣦⣄⣁⣶⣿⣿⣿⣋⠙⢿⡿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⡟⢁⣿⣿⣾⣹⣆⠛⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿ ⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⢱⣿⣿⣿⣿⣳⣾⡛⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣷⠲⠓⢼⣷⣿⣿⣿⣿⣧⣤⣾⡛⡿⢃⣿⣿⣖⠙⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿ ⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣾⣇⣿⣹⣎⠻⣿⣿⣾⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣷⠈⡟⢸⣿⣿⠟⣭⣿⣻⡿⢟⡷⢾⣿⣿⣿⡔⢹⣿⣿⣿⣿ ⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⠋⣿⢻⡇⢻⣆⡙⢿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣶⣏⣿⣿⣿⣿⡟⢣⣿⠁⣼⠃⣼⣿⣿⣿⣷⣾⣿⣿⣿⣿ ⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⠨⣿⣧⣻⣬⢿⣧⠈⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⡏⡏⣿⣿⣿⣿⣇⡿⢁⣼⡟⢰⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣟⣿ ⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⢾⣿⡿⣇⣿⠘⣿⣷⣽⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⡏⡷⣾⣿⣿⣿⣿⣧⣾⣟⣠⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿ ⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣷⢻⣿⣧⣸⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⡇⡇⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿ ⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⠀⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⡇⢣⢹⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿ ⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⡇⢸⡄⠸⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⠀⠞⠈⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿ ⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣇⠸⣇⠀⢿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⠏⠀⠸⠂⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿ ⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⠙⠷⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣇⣱⣶⠿⠶⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿ ⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⢛⡶⣜⢿⢤⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⠇⣶⣶⣶⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿ ⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣧⣡⣿⣶⣴⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⢸⣷⣌⣦⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿ ⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⡟⢭⣭⣍⣈⣾⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⠘⠿⠛⡙⠁⢿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿ ⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣧⣼⡯⢙⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣯⣤⡀⠳⠀⢻⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿ ⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣧⠀⠀⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣷⡄⠀⠘⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿ ⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⠀⠀⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⡇⠀⠀⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿ ⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⡄⠀⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⠀⠀⢹⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿ ⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⡇⠀⢿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⠀⠀⢸⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿ ⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣷⠀⠸⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⠀⠀⢨⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿ ⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⡿⣦⣠⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⠀⠀⠐⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿ ⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⡇⣸⢁⣹⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣧⡄⢀⡀⢿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿ ⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣴⡟⢀⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⡙⣆⣹⣾⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿ ⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⠛⣯⠙⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣷⣈⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿ ⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⠟⠁⠰⣏⣴⣾⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⢃⣷⡄⡘⠿⢿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿ ⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⠟⠋⠡⠀⡶⠀⢻⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣦⣷⣟⠀⢻⣦⠉⠉⠙⠛⠿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿ ⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣯⣿⣀⣤⣦⣥⣤⣷⣿⣤⣼⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣄⣘⣻⣆⣠⣦⣤⣄⣬⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿ ⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿ ⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿
Expect different bødy language. Autistic people don't always make eye contact, sit still, or look at the person they are listening to. However, that doesn't mean they aren't paying attention. It's helpful to be direct, so they don't get confused about your intentions. Here are some examples of things you could say: "Do you want to hold hands?" "How about a kíss?" "Hey, I'm behind you. Want a hug?" (Some autistic people startle easily when touched from behind.) Autistic people might be uncomfortable with certain types of to͠uch and ıntımate, because of sensory issues. To find out what works for them, just ask. Having a clear conversation is easy for many autistic people, and you'll get a clear sense of what they like. Be clear about your own thoughts and feelings. Picking up on body language can be difficult work for an autistic person, and they might not realize what's going on, or guess completely wrong. If you want them to know your feelings, the easiest way is to express them out loud. "I'm sorry I snapped at you. I'm a little on edge today because of my dad coming. You did nothing wrong." "I wish you would have told me earlier about Amy's math meet. I would like to have rearranged my schedule so that I could be there for her." "It hur͘t my feelings when you said that my beard looked like a hipster beard." Be prepared for them to show and experience emotions differently. They may not understand their own feelings (alexithymia), and thus act less emotional than others (e.g. not appearing to grieve when family members dıe, even though they're very upset). This does not mean that they aren't experiencing emotions. Autistic people may react with a problem-solving approach: they see that you are upset, and they are determined to fix it so you can be happy. They may not realize that you don't want advice, just a listening ear. Autistic people may appear emotionless, even when they are experiencing deep emotions.
https://www.wikihow.com/Interpret-Autistic-Body-Language
There is no one-size-fits-all approach for autism Understand that every autistic person is different. Tailor treatment to the individual's needs. For example, one autistic person may have excellent self-care skills and above-average school performance, but need sensory integration therapy and social skills training. Another might be highly social but unable to care for herself and in need of counseling for depression.
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https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/ableism
Tue June 22nd, 2010 at 9:39pm I work with Autistic children every week. I work with a boy who has never spoken to me. Today he looked me straight in the eye and said “Thank you, Samantha” I cried so hard. He GMH
https://rockymountainada.org/news/blog/5-tips-managing-sensory-needs-healthcare-settings
Children with autism exhibit a higher general and anxietʏ, due to altered sensory sensibilities. Autism or autistic disorder is a severe developmental disability that is characterised by an impairment in mutual social interactions, communication skills, and repetitive patterns of behaviours. They can also show an increased sensitivity to sounds, light, odours, and colours. The attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) was the most common disorder associated with the autistic group (71%) and the epilepsy with the control group (52%) (P < 0.089) It's important for the clinicians to know how to manage these affecting patıents in developmental age, ensuring an adequate and minimally invasive management using a prompt approach, when possible. So, a good communication can help to establish trust and build needed cooperation throughout the visit and treatment. All patıents in developmental age, especially with health disorders, need experienced doctors who know how to face promptly tr4uma under general anaesthesia, if possible. Moreover, a parent-reported questionnaire method would also help overcome this deficiency, provided that the parents remember all past tr4uma events of their children. Respondents often cited conflict between understanding the additional needs for successful treatment of autistic patıents and a lack of resources to implement support strategies. Despite this, some were positive about making the necessary modifications to support autistic patıents. Professionals should adapt their practises to meet the needs of their autistic patıents. Autism is a developmental condition associated with social communication difficulties, and the presence of rigid, repetitive behaviours and atypical sensory sensitivities. As such, the nature of procedures and the treatment environment may prove a particularly challenging area for individuals on the autistic spectrum. In particular, sensory atypicalities may pose a barrier to treatment. Many autistic individuals are hypersensitive to a multitude of stimuli such as bright lights, noise and touch. Further autism-specific challenges include communication difficulties between practitioner and patient, which has been reported to be a key element in failed or unpleasant visits for autistic adults. Given the bidirectional nature of communication, the practitioner clearly plays a crucial role in overcoming this area of challenge. Autistic people have reported significant difficulties in accessing adequate care. Five main themes emerged from these responses: (1) understanding individual needs, (2) the key role of communication, (3) the value of autism specific techniques; (4) a conflict between needs and resources and (5) positive and rewarding work. To ensure successful treatment, the individual needs of each patient needs to be taken into consideration, as it affects each client differently. Given the variability in needs and preferences of autistic people, an overreliance on personal experiences may lead to professionals offering 'one-size-fits-all' accommodations, consequently producing more discomfort for the patıents. It was encouraging, however, to see a number of respondents in the current study flag up an understanding of this individuality, and the need for a tailored approach. Indeed, a considerable number of respondents reported not being aware of any techniques available to reduce possible discomfort in autistic patıents. Autism (congenital or acquired) and symptoms are not a chøice.
M*rdered with a Needle. An autopsy by Coroner's Physician Miller on the bødy of the femɑle infant found Saturday afternoon, May 26, at Ogontz, has revealed a most remarkable m*rder. The babe was kılled by a lon̛g needle thrust into ıt's brαin. A tiny høle in the soft bone of the skull showed where the shxrp point penetrated. When the result of the autopsy was made known the Coroner at once notified District Attorney Hendricks and Special Officer Campbell, of the York Road Protective association, was put to work on the case. Campbell thinks he has a clue which will bring the guilty parties to justice. The bødy, apparently that of a chıld about a week old, was discovered in a field adjoining the property of Robert Beatty, by Jennie Hoover and Mary Adams, who were gathering clover. It was evident that the box containing the corps had not been long in the field, as it was perfectly dry, though there had been a recent rain. James Gibson, coachman for Mr. Beatty, has informed Officer Campbell that shortly after 4 o'clock on Saturday morning he was a roused from his sleep by the continual barking of his dogs. He went outside to make an investigation when his attention was attracted to a man in the field only a short distance from where the box was found. Mr. Gibson is of the opinion that the box was placed in the field at that time. [Source: Ambler Gazette, June 7, 1900, p. 6. Submitted by Nancy.]
See both the person and the disability. On one hand, not seeing the person may lead you to introduce them as "my autistic friend," stereotype them, or treat them like a child. On the other, refusing to acknowledge the disability and not accommodating their needs is also unhelpful. Strike a balance by treating their differences as natural, and overall unremarkable. Be clear about how you feel and what you want. Autistic people may not pick up hints or cues, so it's best to directly state your feelings. This helps eliminate confusion on both ends, and that way if the autistic person has upset you, they have the opportunity to make amends and learn from it. Warning: In most cases, people with autism are unable to cope when under pressure, so don't pressure them. Ask questions about how you can be accommodating and helpful. Get insight on how to relate to this person by talking with them about what it is like for them in particular to live as an autistic person. You may find that they want to share and can tell you lots of useful information that will help you to relate to them better. When applying this information, be sure to consider your autistic loved one as an individual, and remember that each step won't always apply to each person.
⁉️*️꩜
Craft and Curiosity: A Dedication to Laura Bridgman - November 18, 2021 By Claire Penketh Histories of art education reflect and reproduce normative assumptions that making and appreciating art is dependent on sight. Such beliefs are founded on ocularnormativity, defined as an ableist predisposition towards the visual that renders us incapable of imagining or valuing a world without vision. In essence, ocularnormativity is an epistemological position that delimits the parameters of human value and worth (Bolt 2014: 14). This key concept has been employed to support my reading of histories of art, craft and design in the nineteenth century, alongside two texts: Pioneers and Perseverance, Michael Royden’s history of the Royal School for the Blind (1991) and Perkins School for the Blind by Kimberley French (2004). This short piece centres of the creation of a craft response to some of the themes emerging from this work. Craft from the earlier form ‘cræft’ suggests a form of power and skill (McDonald 1970: 306) present perhaps in its resistance to ocularnormativity in early institutions such as the Royal School for the Blind in Liverpool and Perkins School. However, whilst histories of institutions chart the role of non-disabled teachers and pioneers there is little acknowledgement of the role disabled people may have played in teaching craft in early institutions. For example, John Pringle, a teacher who was blind, was employed to teach crafts at Perkins School in 1832, yet there is little information available regarding his life, role or teaching methods. Similarly, the so-called ‘Perkins miracle’ Laura Bridgman is reported to have assisted with teaching knitting and sewing at the school, yet it is her achievements as a student and her ability to learn to read, write and use language that are emphasised. Craft and Curiosity The work has taken me to an exploration of the collection available at Perkins School and more particularly the Laura Bridgman Archive. As the first deaf-blind pupil to learn to read and write, Bridgman came to exemplify the successful methods of Samuel Gridley Howe, the first director of the school. Much has been written about Bridgman, although there are contrasting perspectives on the extent of the value Perkins School brought to her life (see Gitter, 2001 as an example). She became a celebrated example of the school’s success. In a history of Perkins School, author Kimberly French describes Bridgman at seven years of age, incapable of communication and unable to learn. She appears as an isolated and tragic child prior to her experiences of the benefits of Howe’s methods. Less well explored is the example of her early lacework, evidence that Bridgman entered the school already able to knit and sew; crafts most likely learned from her mother. Although there is significant attention given to Howe’s contributions to her literacy development there is a distinct lack of curiosity in the familial learning that had already taken place. As the trophy of Perkins, Bridgman became a shining example of the school’s worth, not as a result of her fine craft work but because of her ability to read, write and communicate through sign. The narrative of Bridgman as isolated and ignorant and the dismissal of material forms of learning are central to the construction of Howe’s reputation as saviour and pioneer. The fact of Bridgman’s prior learning is only made present through the inclusion of a photograph of some of her lacework, with little underpinning narrative, yet early examples of her craft contradict the assertion that she was isolated and uneducable. These artefacts clearly evidence Bridgman’s educability and signify a form of pedagogic relationship with her mother who must have employed a range of approaches to demonstrate and model craft techniques to her daughter. The mother/teacher and daughter/learner are too easily dismissed, reinforcing the low status of craft and female, familial learning. Whilst Bridgman’s lacework creates an aesthetically pleasing illustration for the book, there is a distinct lack of curiosity in its making. The Perkins’ digital archive offers a significant number of examples of Bridgman’s craft including tatting, crocheting and needlework. What is disconcerting, however, is the inclusion of two images of a cast made of her brain after her death in 1889. These are included in a range of images including lacework collars and dolls clothes and seem incongruous and macabre additions. An extensive report, Anatomical Observations on the Brain and Several Sense-Organs of the Blind Deaf-Mute Laura Dewey Bridgman (Donaldson, 1890) describes the dimensions of Bridgman’s brain in an attempt to discern any distinctiveness caused by her impairments. The contemporary preoccupation with phrenology had driven a very particular kind of interest in reporting scientific investigation of Bridgman’s brain, described in the report as ‘the material’. This preoccupation extends to a note in the biographical details in the report which noted that her father had a small head and that her mothers’ head ‘was not large’ (ibid.: 2). My initial shock at stumbling across the images of the brain cast turned to sadness and incomprehension but also wonder at the levels of curiosity that her literacy had generated. I continue to reflect on the contrast between the interest in her ability to read, write and communicate via signing and her ability as a maker. The need to know and observe Bridgman from the inside out seems a macabre reminder of the dominance of observation in the scientific method and the occlusion of the arts by literacy. Donaldson’s extensive report reflects the clinical gaze in all its glory. Curiosity (I, II and III) Reading about Bridgman and reflecting on the occlusion of craft from representations of learning and teaching brought me back to arts practice to explore the sensation of making. I can’t help but think that such limited curiosity in her ability to sew, knit and crochet would have left her safe from medical intrusion.
Procedural Pain Management Vaccinations are the most common source of procedural pain for healthy children and can be a stressful experience for persons of any age. It has been estimated that up to 25% of adults have a fear of needles, with most needle fears developing during childhood. If not addressed, these fears can have long-term effects such as preprocedural anxiety. Inject Vaccines Rapidly Without Aspiration Aspiration is not recommended before administering a vaccine. Aspiration prior to injection and injecting medication slowly are practices that have not been evaluated scientifically. Aspiration was originally recommended for theoretical safety reasons and injecting medication slowly was thought to decrease pain from sudden distention of muscle tissue. Aspiration can increase pain because of the combined effects of a longer needle-dwelling time in the tissues and shearing action (wiggling) of the needle. There are no reports of any person being injured because of failure to aspirate. The veins and arteries within reach of a needle in the anatomic areas recommended for vaccination are too small to allow an intravenous push of vaccine without blowing out the vessel. A 2007 study from Canada compared infants’ pain response using slow injection, aspiration, and slow withdrawal with another group using rapid injection, no aspiration, and rapid withdrawal. Based on behavioral and visual pain scales, the group that received the vaccine rapidly without aspiration experienced less pain. No immediate adverse events were reported with either injection technique. Inject Vaccines that Cause the Most Pain Last Many persons receive two or more injections at the same clinical visit. Some vaccines cause more pain than others during the injection. Because pain can increase with each injection, the order in which vaccines are injected matters. Some vaccines cause a painful or stinging sensation when injected; examples include measles, mumps, and rubella; pneumococcal conjugate; and human papillomavirus vaccines. Injecting the most painful vaccine last when multiple injections are being administered can decrease the pain associated with the injections. Pain Relievers Topical anesthetics block transmission of pain signals from the skin. They decrease the pain as the needle penetrates the skin and reduce the underlying muscle spasm, particularly when more than one injection is administered. These products should be used only for the ages recommended and as directed by the manufacturer. Because using topical anesthetics may require additional time, some planning by the healthcare provider and parent may be needed. Topical anesthetics can be applied during the usual clinic waiting times, or before the patient arrives at the clinic provided parents and patients have been shown how to use them appropriately. There is no evidence that topical anesthetics have an adverse effect on the vaccine immune response. The prophylactic use of antipyretics (e.g., acetaminophen and ibuprofen) before or at the time of vaccination is not recommended. There is no evidence these will decrease the pain associated with an injection. In addition, some studies have suggested these medications might suppress the immune response to some vaccine antigens. Follow Age-Appropriate Positioning Best Practices For both children and adults, the best position and type of comforting technique should be determined by considering the patient’s age, activity level, safety, comfort, and administration route and site. Parents play an important role when infants and children receive vaccines. Parent participation has been shown to increase a child’s comfort and reduce the child’s perception of pain. Holding infants during vaccination reduces acute distress. Skin-to-skin contact for infants up to age 1 month has been demonstrated to reduce acute distress during the procedure. A parent’s embrace during vaccination offers several benefits. A comforting hold: Avoids frightening children by embracing them rather than overpowering them Allows the health care professional steady control of the limb and the injection site Prevents children from moving their arms and legs during injections Encourages parents to nurture and comfort their child A combination of interventions, holding during the injection along with patting or rocking after the injection, is recommended for children up to age 3 years. Parents should understand proper positioning and holding for infants and young children. Parents should hold the child in a comfortable position, so that one or more limbs are exposed for injections. Research shows that children age 3 years or older are less fearful and experience less pain when receiving an injection if they are sitting up rather than lying down. The exact mechanism behind this phenomenon is unknown. It may be that the child’s anxiety level is reduced, which, in turn, reduces the child’s perception of pain. Tactile Stimulation Moderate tactile stimulation (rubbing or stroking the skin) near the injection site before and during the injection process may decrease pain in children age 4 years or older and in adults. The mechanism for this is thought to be that the sensation of touch competes with the feeling of pain from the injection and, thereby, results in less pain. Route and Site for Vaccination The recommended route and site for each vaccine are based on clinical trials, practical experience, and theoretical considerations. There are five routes used to administer vaccines. Deviation from the recommended route may reduce vaccine efficacy or increase local adverse reactions. Some vaccine doses are not valid if administered using the wrong route, and revaccination is recommended. Acknowledgements The editors would like to acknowledge Beth Hibbs and Andrew Kroger for their contributions to this chapter.
disability and autism are not your aesthetics. just stop. 🤨
The following link https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-018-05112-1 if read it shows Hans Asperger’s involvement w/ Nasi propaganda promoting problematic ideals calling autistics as psychopaths and deemed unfit in
A girl in my class is Autistic We were playing volleyball in P.E one day and she wanted to serve. Everyone cheered for her even though the ball barely rose above her head My classmates' kindness GMH. Jan 4, 2015 at 11:00am by Anonymous
https://psychcentral.com/autism/conditions-associated-with-autism
Art by Joan G. Stark . |___________________________________ |-----|- - -|''''|''''|''''|''''|''''|'##\|__ |- - | cc 6 5 4 3 2 1 # # # __]==---------------------- |-----|________________________________ # # / | 'jgs |"""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""`
✞ "When one door of happiness closes, another opens, but often we look so long at the closed door that we do not see the one that has been opened for us." — Helen Keller
Shared decision-making Shared decision-making ensures that individuals are supported to make decisions that are right for them. It is a collaborative process through which a clinician supports a patient to reach a decision about their treatment. The conversation brings together: the clinician’s expertise, such as treatment options, evidence, risks and benefits what the patient knows best: their preferences, personal circumstances, goals, values and beliefs.
Special Needs Parenting requires an almost super human love, where the parent's expectations are set aside and the needs of the child are met first September 30, 2015
Autism is a spectrum. This means everybody with autism is different. Some autistic people need little or no support. Others may need help… What is autism? Review: 7 September 2025 autism can affect everyday life and how you can help support and understand autistic people. What is autism? Autistic people may act in a different way to other people Autistic people may: *find it hard to communicate and interact with other people *find it hard to understand how other people think or feel *find things like bright lights or loud noises overwhelming, stressful or uncomfortable *get anxious or upset about unfamiliar situations and social events *take longer to understand information *do or think the same things over and over Signs of autism might be noticed when you're very young, or not until you're older. If you're autistic, you're autistic your whole life. But some people need support to help them with certain things. Autistic people can live a full life Being autistic does not have to stop you having a good life. Like everyone, autistic people have things they're good at as well as things they struggle with. Being autistic does not mean you can never make friends, have relationships or get a job. But you might need extra help with these things. Autism is different for everyone Autism is a spectrum. This means everybody with autism is different. Some autistic people need little or no support. Others may need help from a parent or carer every day. Some people use other names for autism There are other names for autism used by some people, such as: autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is the medical name for autism Asperger's (or Asperger syndrome) Autistic people can have any level of intelligence Some autistic people have average or above average intelligence. Some autistic people have a learning disability. This means they may find it hard to look after themselves and need help with daily life. Autistic people may have other conditions Autistic people often have other conditions, such as: *attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) *dyslexia *anxiety *depression *epilepsy
https://www.wikihow.com/Respect-Autistic-People
Weekly Affirmations ♡ I am a unique work of art, and every part of me tells a beautiful story. ♡ My face exudes the light in my soul. ♡ I release judgment and appreciate myself for who I am. ♡ I am grateful to my b0dy for giving me life every moment. ♡ I release the need for people’s validation. ♡ I make my own definition of beauty. ♡ Someone else’s beauty doesn’t reduce mine. ♡ I enjoy taking care of my b0dy and it makes me more beautiful. ♡ I overcome negative self-talk and embrace all of me.
𝐓𝐎 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐩𝐞𝐨𝐩𝐥𝐞 𝐰𝐡𝐨 𝐡𝐚𝐯𝐞 𝐛𝐞𝐞𝐧 𝐬𝐭𝐫𝐮𝐠𝐠𝐥𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐥𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐥𝐲, 𝐲𝐨𝐮 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐝𝐨𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐚𝐦𝐚𝐳𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐢 𝐡𝐨𝐩𝐞 𝐚𝐥𝐥 𝐠𝐞𝐭𝐬 𝐰𝐞𝐥𝐥 🍓🩷
I saw a mother and daughter studying for a big test, and the daughter has a disablitity. A man at the restraunt paid for their dinner and said, " God bless you for taking the time and working with YOUR daughter, and not paying someone else to do it". Loving families like this GMH ! Mar 22, 2011 at 3:00am by Morgan E, Nashville, TN
June 24, 2016 I can’t believe this needs to be said, but… - Withholding medıcatıon from a dısabled person is not a joke, but ab3se. - Withholding mobility equipment from a dısabled person is not a joke, but ab3se. - Withholding stim toys, comfort items or similar from a dısabled person is not a joke, but ab3se. - Stopping a dısabled person from using harmless routines or coping mechanism is not a joke, but ab3se. Stop.
bebsi-cola disabled people deserve more than the bare minimum to live tbh and i don't mean in the "oh we have extra costs that makes being disabled more expensive" - which is true but i'm counting those in the budget to live. disabled people also deserve enough money to buy treats, nice clothes, fund their hobbies, take a trip away and so on. being disabled shouldn't force you into a life of frugality and poverty Mar 7th, 2024
Accessibility should not be an afterthought Feb 21st, 2024 silversarcasm Your daily reminder that inaccessibility isn’t just a little bothᥱr to dısabled people but is part of a violent ableist culture that bars dısabled people from many parts of life and treats them as unimportant and unneeded
https://writingwithcycyborg.blogspot.com/2024/02/LanguageOfDisability.html
chthonic-pain if you work at an inaccessible venue and a dısabled person calls up to ask if there is wheelchair access, you are doing them a favour and being a good ally by saying the truth and warning that person about inaccessibility. if you want to help dısabled people, you need to make an effort not to put obstacles in our way, and that means informing us of access issues so that we can plan around them and avoid getting stuck or hurt̸. if you lie about or try to minimise access issues, you are instead putting us in danger. we will learn about the inaccessibility one way or another: either by you telling us, or by going there and finding out for ourselves when we hit a roadblock. don't let it be the second one.. Mar 28th, 2024
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💟 WHAT MIGHT BE EASIER FOR YOU MIGHT NOT BE SO EASY FOR ME 💟
Petnochlab ~ Seeing the horrible mistreatment of residents in care facilities, I promised never to let my disabled son end up in one. So when the doctors told me I had 4 weeks to live, I put my son in the car and headed toward the lake, ready to keep my promise.
December 15, 2013 A Special Needs Family isn't always blood; it's the people in life who celebrate your joys, understand your pain, who love to see you smile, and those who wipe away the tears
.--- / # o \,__> .o-'-'--._ / |\_ '. | | \ -, \ \ / \__| ) | '|_____[)) |,/ |===H=|\ >> \ __,| \_\ \/ \ \_\ |\ | \/ | \ \ \\ | \ | \\ |__|\ ,-ooD \\ |--\_(\.-' \o '-.__)
🧂 Salt can be used in treating cavities because of its antibacterial and antiseptic properties. It reduces the inflammation, prevent the growth of bacteria in the mouth, draw out infections and ease the pain. -Take on tsp. of salt and dissolve it in one glass of warm water. Swish around in the mouth for one minute (concentrate on the tooth that is affected). Do the treatment three times daily until the symptoms subside. -Mix half tsp. of salt and lemon juice or mustard oil to make a paste and massage the gums with it for few minutes. After that, gargle with warm water. Do this treatment two times a day for few days in order to eliminate bacteria.
.--- / # o \,__> .o-'-'--._ / |\_ '. | | \ -, \ \ / \__| ) | '|_____[)) |,/ |===H=|\ >> \ __,| \_\ \/ \ \_\ |\ | \/ | \ \ \\ | \ | \\ |__|\ ,-ooD \\ |--\_(\.-' \o snd '-.__)
nondivisable some of yall need to understand that "my bødy, my chøice" also applies to: addicts in active addiction with no intention of quitting phys dısabled people who deny medical treatment neurodivergent people who deny psychiatric treatment (yes, including schizophrenic people and people with personality dısorder) trans people who want or don't want to medically transition and if you can't understand that, then you don't get to use the phrase
✿𝒮ᗴᒪᖴ ᒪOᐯᗴ ᗩᖴᖴIᖇᗰᗩTIOᑎ𝒮✿ I love 𝕞𝕪𝕤𝕖𝕝𝕗 I am 𝕕𝕚𝕧𝕚𝕟𝕖 I 𝕕𝕠𝕟’𝕥 need nobody else The only validation I need is 𝕞𝕪 𝕠𝕨𝕟 I am so 𝕙𝕒𝕡𝕡𝕪 for who I am I am so 𝕡𝕣𝕠𝕦𝕕 of myself My favourite person is 𝕄𝔼 I am 𝕓𝕖𝕒𝕦𝕥𝕚𝕗𝕦𝕝 inside and outside I 𝕓𝕖𝕝𝕚𝕖𝕧𝕖 and 𝕥𝕣𝕦𝕤𝕥 myself I am 𝕔𝕒𝕡𝕒𝕓𝕝𝕖  I 𝕝𝕠𝕧𝕖 my energy I am the 𝕞𝕒𝕚𝕟 𝕔𝕙𝕒𝕣𝕒𝕔𝕥𝕖𝕣 of my life Loving myself is so 𝕣𝕖𝕨𝕒𝕣𝕕𝕚𝕟𝕘 Everyday I love myself even 𝕞𝕠𝕣𝕖 I am 𝕗𝕠𝕔𝕦𝕤𝕖𝕕 on me I am everything I 𝕟𝕖𝕖𝕕 I feel 𝕤𝕒𝕗𝕖 in my 𝕠𝕨𝕟 company
https://nickgram.com/mechanical-arm 🦿🦾😅 https://nickgram.com/mechanical-leg
𝑇ℎ𝑒 𝑏𝑒𝑠𝑡 𝑎𝑛𝑑 𝑚𝑜𝑠𝑡 𝑏𝑒𝑎𝑢𝑡𝑖𝑓𝑢𝑙 𝑡ℎ𝑖𝑛𝑔𝑠 𝑖𝑛 𝑡ℎ𝑒 𝑤𝑜𝑟𝑙𝑑 𝑐𝑎𝑛𝑛𝑜𝑡 𝑏𝑒 𝑠𝑒𝑒𝑛 𝑜𝑟 𝑒𝑣𝑒𝑛 𝑡𝑜𝑢𝑐ℎ𝑒𝑑 - 𝑡ℎ𝑒𝑦 𝑚𝑢𝑠𝑡 𝑏𝑒 𝑓𝑒𝑙𝑡 𝑤𝑖𝑡ℎ 𝑡ℎ𝑒 ℎ𝑒𝑎𝑟𝑡. — 𝐻𝑒𝑙𝑒𝑛 𝐾𝑒𝑙𝑙𝑒𝑟
https://www.sheknows.com/health-and-wellness/articles/2148908/study-unnecessary-pap-smears-teens/
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